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This is Topic: The Treasure Hunter's Gazette
Following are the News Items published under this Topic.



Treasure Hunter's Gazette March 2014
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, February 20, 2014 - 08:02 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

Treasure Hunter's Gazette March 2014

Read the Gazette

21th Annual Best O' North East Treasure Hunters weekend, April 24, 25, 26 & 27, 2014 The treasure hunter's & prospectors hobby show with workshops, including one bu Jason Sevene of Swanzey, NH is April 27 from 8:30am to 3:30pm at the Keene, NH Recreation Center, 312 Washington St. Please attend & support!more details www.streeter.org or Streeters 1-603-876-4443



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Battery test
Posted by: Webmaster on Saturday, February 15, 2014 - 06:14 PM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

I had never heard of this before but pretty cool.<?XML:NAMESPACE PREFIX = "O" /><O:P></O:P>

Watch to the end, only 90 seconds long.   <O:P></O:P>

www.youtube.com/embed/Y_m6p99l6ME<O:P></O:P>



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Attention Massachusetts residents, or those that frequent the state
Posted by: Webmaster on Tuesday, February 04, 2014 - 06:30 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

To all concerned citizens,

Risk to Private Property Rights

New proposed law needs organized opposition:

Please send to those that might want to help!!!!

Massachusetts residents, or those that frequent the state...Anyone who  
likes to hunt for anything, either with a metal detector, or even just  
bottles or rocks ...anything these clowns think might be something  
they feel no one but them should be looking for...you know the thems I  
am talking about, the self-anointed specialists, all housed at  
UMASS....The following will be severely detrimental to all  
hobbyists...and it especially pertains to PRIVATE PROPERTY....even  
your back yard could be deemed something they might want to study a  
hundred years from now and you couldn't even touch it without their  
permission. This bill just gives way too much power over PERSONAL  
PROPERTY RIGHTS that anyone should be concerned...could set precedence  
for other states to follow suit.

They slid the preliminaries through with almost no real notice and  
very few knew anything about it...not finalized yet.....Please get the  
FDMAC and any other such group onto this!!!!
House Bill No. 744

Presented on Jan. 17 2013 by Peter V. Kocot, D-Northampton, and co-signed
by Hampshire County sister Ellen Story, D-Amherst.

There is hereby established a special commission on protecting the  
archaeological, geological, and fossil resources of the Connecticut  
River Valley. Said special commission shall review existing special  
and general laws, may hold hearings at various locations across the  
Commonwealth to obtain written and oral testimony and may consult with  
state and federal agencies to determine if existing state laws and  
regulations adequately protect the archaeological, geological and  
fossil resources located within the Connecticut River Valley. Said  
special commission shall be comprised of three members of the House of  
Representatives, appointed by the Speaker, of which at least two shall  
be from a district in western Massachusetts that includes a portion of  
the Connecticut river that has significant fossil, archaeological or  
geological deposits; three members of the Senate, appointed by the  
President, of which at least two shall be from a district in western  
Massachusetts that includes the Connecticut river; four of whom shall  
be appointed by the Governor, of which one shall be a professor of  
archaeology at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, one of whom  
shall be a recognized authority on western Massachusetts geological  
formations who is a professor at a Massachusetts college or  
university, one whom shall be an environmental police officer who has  
experience with investigating the unlawful removal of archaeological,  
geological or fossil resources, and one of whom shall be of native  
American descent of a tribe indigenous to western Massachusetts; one  
member shall be appointed by the secretary of the commonwealth, who  
shall be knowledgeable of the archaeological and historic resources of  
the Connecticut river valley. Said special commission may receive  
funding through state appropriation or grants, federal appropriation  
or grants, private gifts and donations, provided, that said special  
commission shall file its report......



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Diesel Says Know Your Batteries
Posted by: Webmaster on Friday, January 31, 2014 - 06:07 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette
Diesel Says Know Your Batteries
 
Why is it not OK to mix different AA batteries?
 
 
Because they all don’t produce the same voltage, the voltage a battery produces depends on the particular chemicals inside, regardless of the size. Alkaline batteries all produce 1.523 volts, ni-cads produce 1.2 volts, lead-asides produce 2.2, and typical consumer lithium batteries 3.7 volts.
Lots of electronic devices are not all  that dependant  on voltage, so they can handle either alkaline or ni-cads, for instance.  And they would not be bothered if you mixed battery types. 
 
But the batteries themselves wouldn’t like it. Batteries are like pumps for electrons. They can pump electrons at various pressures, and that pressure is measured in voltage.  If you mix two different types of batteries, the higher pressure one can force the other one to work backwards. And it will break it.   “Broken” batteries just usually die or leak, but sometimes they can pop or even explode.
 
It’s very important that everyone remove the batteries in your detector when you store it for ant length of time. In the case where your batteries leak or explode, and damage your detector or worse the manufacturer will not cover you under their warranty. But! it is of “value for you to know” when you buy good quality batteries and don’t mix brands, and  there is a problem like leakage.   Duracell, Everady Energizer, and Rayovac offer  to repair any damage caused by leaking batteries. I only buy them and never store brands.  Even though the discount store brands offer the same performance for a lot less money , when you eventually have one leak  in your detector you’ll be very, very glad that you weren’t using store brand alkalines ! 
 
Diesel and Goldfinger say! “Buy American”   Top rated by consumer reports was ( Duracell Ultra Power ) .
 
 
DURACELL
Berkshire Corporate Park
Bethel, CT 06801
USA
Attn. Consumer Dept.
 
Energizer Battery Company
Consumer Affaires
25225 Detroit Road
Westlake, OH 44145-2536
USA


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Treasure Hunter's Gazette #161 September-October 2013
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, September 23, 2013 - 04:49 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

Treasure Hunter's Gazette #161 September-October 2013

Read the Gazette



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Sweet health food - The Pineapple
Posted by: Webmaster on Wednesday, June 19, 2013 - 06:22 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

The pineapple is a member of the bromeliad family.
It is extremely rare that bromeliads produce edible fruit.
The pineapple is the only available edible bromeliad today.
It is a multiple fruit. One pineapple is actually made up of dozens of
individual floweret's that grow together to form the entire fruit. Each
scale on a pineapple is evidence of a separate flower.
Pineapples stop ripening the minute they are picked.
No special way of storing them will help ripen them further.
Color is relatively unimportant in determining ripeness.
Choose your pineapple by smell.If it smells fresh, tropical and sweet,
it will be a good fruit.
The more scales on the pineapple, the sweeter and juicier the taste.
After you cut off the top, you can plant it.
It should grow much like a sweet potato will.
This delicious fruit is not only sweet and tropical; it also offers
many benefits to our health. Pineapple is a remarkable fruit.
We find it enjoyable because of its lush, sweet and exotic flavor, but
it may also be one of the most healthful foods available today.
If we take a more detailed look at it, we will find that pineapple is
valuable for easing indigestion, arthritis or sinusitis.
The juice has an anthelmintic effect; it helps get rid of intestinal
worms.
Let's look at how pineapple affects other conditions.
Pineapple is high in manganese, a mineral that is critical to
development of strong bones and connective tissue. A cup of fresh
pineapple will give you nearly 75% of the recommended daily amount.
It is particularly helpful to older adults, whose bones tend to become
brittle with age.
Bromelain, a proteolytic enzyme, is the key to pineapple's value.
Proteolytic means "breaks down protein", which is why pineapple is
known to be a digestive aid. It helps the body digest proteins more
efficiently.
Bromelain is also considered an effective anti-inflammatory.
Regular ingestion of at least one half cup of fresh pineapple daily is
purported to relieve painful joints common to osteoarthritis. It also
produces mild pain relief.
In Germany, bromelain is approved as a post-injury medication because
it is thought to reduce inflammation and swelling.
Orange juice is a popular liquid for those suffering from a cold
because it is high in Vitamin C.
Fresh pineapple is not only high in this vitamin, but because of the
Bromelain, it has the ability to reduce mucous in the throat.
If you have a cold with a productive cough, add pineapple to your diet.
It is commonly used in Europe as a post-operative measure to cut mucous
after certain sinus and throat operations.
Those individuals who eat fresh pineapple daily report fewer sinus
problems related to allergies. In and of itself, pineapple has a very
low risk for allergies.
Pineapple is also known to discourage blood clot development. This
makes it a valuable dietary addition for frequent fliers and others who
may be at risk for blood clots.
An old folk remedy for morning sickness is fresh pineapple juice. It
really works! Fresh juice and some nuts first thing in the morning
often make a difference.
It's also good for a healthier mouth. The fresh juice discourages
plaque growth.

DO SHARE THIS INFORMATIVE ARTICLE!!



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Minelab CTX 3030- First Impressions
Posted by: Webmaster on Saturday, December 29, 2012 - 01:55 PM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

Minelab CTX 3030- First Impressions
By Chris Valerio

Many years ago I was visiting a metal detector dealer who sold machines out of his house. It just happened that day a Minelab representative was also in the house! Boy it was my lucky day and I could pepper him all sorts of detector questions. So I did and one nagging concern was, “When will Minelab build a waterproof FBS Explorer?” His response was not exactly what I wanted to hear nor expected. He simply stated that Minelab was happy with the current FBS Excalibur/Sovereign technology. That’s all folks! Much to my disappointment, there would be no waterproof FBS machine on the horizon. I had often thought if the 17 frequencies of BBS performed well on saltwater beaches, then the increased frequencies of an FBS machine would be even better? Later the detector dealer implied that Minelab might be having problems with FBS in saltwater. That seemed reasonable, so I swallowed that misnomer hook, line and sinker. Heck, I was still wet behind the ears back then.

Despite this and as the years flew by, I kept an open eye for Minelab to release a new waterproof Explorer. With each Happy New Years, it did not happen; funny how time flies when having such fun? Yet on the detecting forums, hobbyists were converting Explorers for the deep. Even I delved into the possibility and purchased an older Explorer XS for such a waterproof project. I did all sorts of research to discover the many ways to accomplish this feat, from placing the electronics into a waterproof bag, to a customized box. I’ll never forget how one on line treasure hunter had made a custom form fitting Lexan type waterproof Explorer skin in his garage. It nearly looked factory and made me wonder in amazement how he did it? I pretty much salivated with envy at the sight and may even still have the photo in my treasure files!

To make a long story short I finally abandoned my Explorer project, coming to the sensible conclusion that to make an Explorer waterproof, was simply not worth the effort. Mostly because… I was having such great success finding all sorts of gold jewelry with my Excaliburs in the sea. Plus if a waterproof Explorer was such a great idea, Minelab surely would have done it by now?
Fast forward to 2012, and while I can’t divulge my sources, I had caught wind of a possible new Minelab waterproof wonder machine. Yeah right, just another rumor! Well that rumor actually turned out to become a reality and the Minelab CTX 3030 was born. Still somewhat in disbelief, my first thoughts were why was the CTX named after a famous Winchester rifle cartridge, which had helped to win the Wild West? And what was all this CTX stuff all about anyway? I had sort of expected something like Excalibur PRO, or Explorer Aqua… Get over it- Whatever… and CTX 3030 is now starting to stick.

As things turned out, I was not so eager to jump on the CTX bandwagon at first. I wondered about the possibility of bugs needing to be worked out o such a new machine, and also the somewhat expensive price tag, towering way above that of a new Excalibur. Yes the CTX price tag seems a bit hefty, and it is. But I rationalized with the current price of gold; it would not take too many finds to pay for my new CTX. Besides, I would find so much gold, platinum and silver with the new-fangled machine, it would be all worth it! Yup, I just had to own a CTX 3030 badly and made plans accordingly. Those plans included my selling 2 used detectors and some other Man Toys. Once I had the needed cash burning a hole in my pocket I called George Streeter, owner of Streeter Electronics in Marlborough NH about getting my hands on a 3030. (603-876-4443) A few weeks later George offered me a smoking CTX deal and one impossible to pass up. So I now belong to Club CTX!

I had often thought that a new CTX would make me a wonderful Christmas gift under the tree, but the CTX purchase was always delayed and simmering on the back burner due to a somewhat hectic life. Amazingly and like magic my new CTX showed up on Christmas day. I said Christmas day! I do not know for sure how this exactly happened, because I only expected the delivery well after Christmas or perhaps even in the year 2013! Yet there the CTX was on Christmas day and I was excited like a kid once again, like back in 1965 and a very good time to have been alive. That’s the same year my parents were among the first to own the most beautiful car on earth, a head-turning poppy red Mustang convertible with black top, horse head bumper guards, chrome trunk luggage rack and wire wheels… what good memories!

Minelab, please take a deep bow and my hats off to you! Clearly with the CTX you have brought the future of metal detecting to us. Why when I unboxed the CTX I thought I had jumped a time warp portal! Beam me up Scotty, what a futuristic looking machine… like its 3030! So I’ll party like its 2012! Minelab has definitely set a new standard with the CTX 3030, and I’m McLovin every second of it! The CTX 3030 has blown my dreams of a waterproof Explorer right out of the sea-park and into my eager paws! The CTX is really here, a fantastic looking and waterproof FBS machine. Most impressive to me is the slick carbon fiber shaft. I had always wondered if such a shaft, say on an Excalibur, would reduce false signals that a metal shaft might attract like an antenna? Then there is the TID screen in full color, with more target information options than one can throw a stick at! The new detecting concepts the CTX offers are simply amazing! They do take a bit to grasp at first, but promise to make detecting a much more efficient experience. Why dig all that junk in the sea and beach, when you can just dig the gold, silver and platinum? OK so I may be exaggerating a bit here, but the CTX may very well help you to find more treasure in less time! We shall see, but right now I’m simply elated with my new amazing 3030! With the CTX I can shallow water hunt to 10 feet deep, adjust target response tones, see target iron content, conductivity and depth instantly plastered on the screen, easily edit out pesky trash targets, know what the heck time it is even though no one may care, toggle between 10 fully customizable search modes and chart and plot my exact global position on our green and blue earth, search trail and finds/waypoints with the built in GPS! My CTX GPS got a position fix in less than 1 minute! Plus again and even though I didn’t care, I knew exactly what time it was! Like I said before, Scotty beams me up!

The CTX is a very well designed and quality made metal detector. It just looks cool and instills a sense of confidence. With a CTX one can use the same machine for some 90% of treasure hunting from coins to sea, while with practice becoming a professional treasure scooping fool. Like, become one with your machine Yoda! Plus one can download any new and better software upgrades offered by Minelab, such as the recent and worthwhile seawater and pinpoint settings. No longer does one have to worry that much about technology outdating your machine. The Minelab downloads will make your detector new again and again.
The future of detecting is here now. It’s called the Minelab CTX 3030. I expect to find lots of treasure with my new CTX. You can too and the best place to get your 3030 is from Streeter Electronics, where the deals are great and the knowledge is Free! Give George a call at 603-876-4443.  George  will go out of his way to help you and he may even invite you, on one of his famous Caribbean treasure hunting trips!

So where exactly does a Minelab CTX 3030 fit in? Well, it’s not like an Excalibur and most likely will not replace the Excalibur anytime soon. Neither is it an E-Trac. A famous Florida beach and shallow water treasure hunter recently told me, the CTX is more like a waterproof E-TRAC on steroids! I see the CTX as a great all-round metal detector for either novice or Pro. It can be easy or complex and can find most treasures on earth. With the new Minelab CTX 3030 the phrase, that was then and this is now really applies! May the Gold Gods be with you, Chris cabochris@msn.com    

Article  copyright and  written exclusively for Streeter Electronics and George Streeter. No copies without permission of author and Streeter Electronics.



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George Streeter finds with his Compass and Whites metal detectors in 70s and 80's
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, November 19, 2012 - 09:27 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

photostreetercompassfinds1.JPG

"My 3 oldest silver halves metal detector finds & the one that caught a crook. The top, left and right are the oldest. Top is 1832 Bust, left is seated 1857-O and right is a Seated 1853-O. All were found with a Compass 99B in new Hampshire in the 1970s.
  On the bottom is the half dollar coin found in a crooks pocket after stealing my collection. It was originally found with my first Garrett Grand Master Hunter metal detector on a Brattleboro, VT common. I have been a Garrett dealer and user for a long time.  Years ago before i got the guard dog and close circuit  cameras, part of a collection was stolen.  After following police dog police found 2 men in a campsite and one guy had one of my coin books in his lap  In his pocket was one of the stolen coins, a 1908 Barber half dollar, which i had found in 1988.
  As soon as I get time will post more pictures and bits of news.

photostreetercompassfinds2.JPG



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Hunting a Nebraska River Town
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, November 15, 2012 - 06:29 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Hunting a Nebraska River Town
By Chad Novacek

I have had the pleasure of hunting with the “Streeter Gang” as I like to call George Streeter and his band of international sea hunters, on a couple of occasions in Guadaloupe, France.  George has always been a gracious and generous host, willing to impart the wisdom of treasure hunting on those who ride with him.  George takes his guests to some of the most exotic hunting spots replete with amazing beaches and warm ocean breezes…the perfect office for those able to make a living this way.  With George, I have personally found nearly two ounces of gold within two trips that includes my first gold coin, an 1892 British Half Sovereign.  I’m just an amateur, but those with more experience are sure to find at least an ounce of gold per week with the Streeter Gang.  And if you’re anything like the legendary “Goldmaster,” you’ll easily find over double the gold that an average bloke finds along with a few ship relics like hull spikes.

George and his crew have inspired me to continue the hobby of treasure hunting.  In October, I conducted my first land hunt in many years in the Nebraska river town of Brownville.  I chose Brownville because it is one of the oldest towns (1854) in a state that joined the Union in 1867 and I had permission to hunt a significant amount of land there.   I took a week off from work and dove right in.

The wooded, hilly landscape of Brownville is dotted with beautiful antebellum homes and a small creek (with plenty of relics) runs through the town.  Residents tell me there were many wooden shanties spread throughout at the town’s population peak in the late 1870s, so good metal detecting targets could be found anywhere.  Unfortunately, I had failed to do any meaningful research and my reach was limited to a handful of properties I had permission to hunt.

Brownville’s lifeblood was its steamboat river traffic, but the town faced a serious challenge in the late 1850s and throughout the 1860s when the railroads expanded in the west and major rail lines operating far from Brownville threatened to re-route cargo.

After a failed attempt to create a railroad from the town, Brownville was saddled with massive debt.  Local officials responded by raising taxes significantly and as a result, the population of Brownville declined precipitously throughout the early 1880s.

I saw Brownville as virgin hunting territory, a time capsule full of mid to late-19th century finds.   For my base of operations, I settled into my friend’s place, a two story home built in 1856 and uninhabited since the 1930s.  Not only did I initially have permission to hunt my friend’s six properties, but with each new person I met, I gained access to more and more land (more than I could hunt in a week).

Of course in this hobby, one has to be patient, be grateful for what they find and keep expectations realistic.  Most of us are not going to find a hoard of gold Roman coins or the Ark of the Covenant.  We've all dug our share of pull tabs and aluminum foil in our quest for the occasional great find that makes the hunt all worth it.  With each find is a connection to our past and a lesson in history.  Handling a recently unearthed relic or coin may be the closest thing we have to time travel, which is pretty exciting.

Within the first 30 minutes of hunting, I found what was to be my prize find, a Baggage Claim Tag from the St. Jo Omnibus Company with the additional inscription “H & St. Jo Packet.”  Limited research revealed that this artifact was possibly either from a stagecoach line operating out of St. Jo, Missouri or from a steamboat (packet boat) ferrying luggage from the Hannibal & St. Jo Railroad.

chadbaggagetag.JPG
  
After the sixth, eight hour day of detecting in over 10 locations, the most notable relics included a massive unfired .45 caliber bullet (no rim markings and two exterior grooves on the bullet like a Minié ball), an ornate and beautiful woman’s hair pick, half of a gold locket (found four feet from an ornate purple glass and silver broach), ladies wrist watch, an aluminum thimble and a “pep club” pin.  My brother, who arrived, only to hunt for a half an hour managed to find a 2¢ Colorado Sales Tax Token.

chadbullet.JPG

My best coin finds included a well-worn 19th century Canadian five cent “fish scale,” a 1944 Mercury and a 1951 FDR dime and wheat pennies from 1915 and 1919 (x2).  The large cent I sought eluded me this time.

chadcoins.JPG

I’m convinced that the town of Brownville, Nebraska holds many more interesting finds and I can’t wait to go back.



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Author of the Suzy jokes in the Treasure Hunter's Gazette
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, July 05, 2012 - 07:59 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

IMG_0373.jpg

This is the author of the Suzy jokes in the Treasure Hunter's Gazette



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Caribbean Delight By Bruce Southerland
Posted by: Webmaster on Sunday, January 08, 2012 - 08:06 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

It was probably 20 years ago when George Streeter planted an idea in me that turned into a dream and eventually became a delightful reality. On one of my early visit’s to Streeter’s to pick up some prospecting supplies, George said he had found a more enjoyable way to find a lot more gold than by panning. Instead of going where nature had concentrated gold, go where human nature had concentrated it. No, George was not suggesting a bank heist. The idea was both legal and extremely seductive—go to a beautiful place with exotic shorelines and crystal blue water and recover the tiny treasures lost by well-heeled vacationers.

Over the years George has perfected this simple strategy for helping his customers turn their hobby into a paid vacation: 1st, sell the best detectors (Minelab) at a competitive price. 2nd, invite those customers to join George and a few friends on one of his treasure hunting vacations. 3rd, share all expenses. 4th, find gold. This sounds simple, but it only works because of George’s gracious personality, laid-back style and his skill as a detectorist.

Although George’s plan was simple, timing is everything. It took a while for the circumstances in my life to line up with this opportunity. Our children are grown, I inherited a little bit of money from my Dad, my brother’s were taking up my Dad’s interest in metal detecting and my wife and I were looking for something we could enjoy together. Step one—purchase a detector in memory of my father. This way I could relate to my brothers and we could check out metal detecting as something Cathy and I could enjoy together. We bought an Excalibur from Streeter’s and found some coins and jewelry at a nearby beach. So far, so good. Now the time was right to suggest that we might enjoy a trip to a tropical paradise. I am blessed with the best wife a man could have. She is frugal to a fault, and in her mind vacationing in the Caribbean is only for rich people. I told her that I had discovered a way for us to enjoy a beautiful spot with warm water at a fraction of the normal cost. We would share expenses with some other people and might find some jewelry to offset some of the remaining costs.

My introverted wife was more than a little nervous about sharing accommodations with strangers. I assured her that these strangers were hand-picked friends of George and all would go well. Besides we would be playing in the warm surf every day. Visions of snorkeling among glowing fish won her over and she consented to trust me. Sweet victory! St. Lucia, here we come.

Wow, everything was beautiful, the accommodations were excellent and the treasure hunting was a blast. In my opinion, George has found just the right balance between an intense focus on finding valuable lost jewelry every day and enjoying a relaxing, friendly vacation. On our first day in the water our little group found rings made of various metals: palladium, cobalt, tungsten carbide, and of course gold. By the following day we added platinum and silver, not to mention all of the coins. By the 4th day, George snagged a beautiful ring with a central teardrop emerald surrounded by diamonds. I was informed that we were not finding very much compared to previous trips, but the growing pile of precious finds sure amazed me and my wife. Of course, since we are brand new at detecting, we didn’t find as much as the others.

But we actually came home with gold and silver that we had personally plucked from the waters of our new treasure island.

I know it’s not right to gloat, but…. We were experiencing warm turquoise water, delicious fresh coconut, spectacular vistas, and the scent of exotic flowers while at home in New England they were buried under two feet of snow from a freak storm—sweet deal! OK, the weather wasn’t perfect every day, but even when it rained there were pleasant surprises. One day the sun was shining during a cloud burst and the raindrops hitting the water at eye-level created a surreal glittering diamond shower. My wife says the best parts of the trip were the simple natural pleasures like seeing a tiny hermit crab scamper across the beach, birds diving for their dinner, and silvery flying fish. And it’s hard to beat the sounds of steel drum melodies and peeping frogs rising between the rhythms of waves breaking on the beach.

Our trip was delightful—360 degree beauty, new friends, learning how to metal detect in the surf, and finding valuable treasure. Thanks George for sharing your secret for staying so kind and mellow.



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My Gold Mining Trip to South Fork of 12 Mile Creek
Posted by: Webmaster on Sunday, January 08, 2012 - 08:05 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

My Gold Mining Trip to South Fork of 12 Mile Creek

By Craig Gifford, Rindge, NH

My trip came to me via a my friend Terry, whom I’ve known since my last trip to Alaska in 1998. In 2002 I returned to Alaska to try to score on some government work. Not being a Union member made it tough however, I did get on a small job that lasted a few months.

On the way out during my second trip, Terry mentioned his private claim on the Koyukuk River, just south of the Brooks Range. He indicated that someday he planned on going up there and working his claim & I would be invited when it was time.

Eight years passed & in the Spring of 2010, I got the go ahead to start planning & headed up to give it a shot. I finished up my work and packed up my gear and headed out.

After 9 days of driving, I arrived in Salcha, Alaska. I won’t get into any details, however I will say this trip was fraught with troubles and expenses and I was not properly prepared. Just the same, the feeling of enjoyment of arriving and being in Alaska was an experience worth the unexpected misery of the drive!

Upon arrival I quickly shock down all my gear and Terry helped me out reducing the amount of stuff I had brought with me. Going to the back country meant you have to think necessity and survival gear on top of a fair quantity of panning & mining equipment. Most importantly of all a well put together tool kit is a must..

Because we were using ATV’s with trailers & a 20” Carolina flat bottom skiff we could carry some bulky gear.

Our destination for our meeting up with the rest of the crew was a pipe line access area about 6 miles south of Cold Foot, Alaska. This small town is a truck stop location that is seen on the TV show “Ice Road Truckers” Running the haul road to get to your mining site is a very thrilling experience. I could write an article on the haul road alone, but for that matter anywhere you go in Alaska presents itself A story worthy experience.

After meeting up with 2 other guys, I was going to be working with, we started loading my equipment onto ATV trailers and started shuttling gear to the boat landing.

We then loaded gear into the boat, which was followed by a thrilling ride down the Koyukuk river. The boat ride was somewhat frightening. I had never been in a motor boat traveling through heavy current with a 649 pound ATV in the middle of the boat. I was grateful the river was only a few miles long.

We ran a 4 ½ mile trip from the boat landing to a place that was set up as a lower base camp. This camp was made up from an old building left from the Alaskan pipeline construction. These were nice comfortable rooms with a kitchen area complete with a gas stove/ oven sink. It was here that we stayed until we finished building the upper camp where we would be mining.

The next day we started shuttling gear up one of the roughest ATV trails I have ever been on. It was slow going with a lot of water crossings that put your arms and machine to the test. We spent that entire day moving what equipment we needed for that time being. T he next day we set up the upper camp which included building the outhouse (BLM requirement), a fire pit and a rather nice cook tent / dining area.

That evening we started putting the dredge together. It was a kind of new 6’ Gold Grabber with dual 6 ½ hp engines. We finished the dredge, the next day & got suited up for our first dredge run. Not to sound like somewhat of a critic, however my first observation was this was a very shallow creek to put a fair size dredge in it, We were somewhat limited to where we could put this dredge & picked the best spot and fired it up. The first run we ran the dredge backwards so we could create a sport to work from. Upon having done that, we spun the dredge around and worked up stream for a couple of days. One difficulty we were to have was a rather sizeable sheet of ice that was about a mile up the river from us, It was grinding up a lot of clay and silt, making the water very cloudy. Because of this, we were having trouble getting deeper into the clay & bedrock, which was only 2 to 3 feet beyond our reach. Due to bad visibility, we had to move by feel.

After a few days, we did our first cleanup. We hand panned for three plus hours and seemed to be doing alright, though nobody was jumping for joy. The gold was very fine and that puzzled me. I had never seen that much fine gold without a few pieces. I thought  there would have been some sort of explanation, but it was seldom mentioned & never discussed. After that clean up, I started running the Keene high banker & doing some sampling. I was getting color just about everywhere I went. Even though I’m an amateur prospector, I believe that everything was looking good for this creek. I’m sure there is a hot spot here, somewhere.

On the next run, we moved up the creek a little & tried it again.Four days of running and we go for another clean up. We got about the same amount as we did the first time. At this point a little bit of grumpiness is starting to emerge from a few. It has become obvious that we are not on our way to becoming rich. This really stinks, because I felt like I was just starting to get my feet wet.

Mutiny from the skipper. Can the shipper of a boat conduct his own mutiny? Yes, hr can when it’s the only boat out there. THERE SEEMS TO BE A CONCERN OVER THE AMOUNT OF SMOKE THAT IS FILLING THE AIR. A forest fire was nearby and the decision was made that we are leaving. Bummer!

As we are breaking down the camp, a torrential rain storm envelopes us. The creek trail we needed, became impossible.. I mean flood. We moved a lot of gear to higher ground and were marooned until the water reseeded. It took 3 days for the water to drop enough so we could make our run to lower camp. While we were waiting, we weighed up our gold and came up with just under 2 ounces. Finding that out only added to the disappointment of a few members of the group. Not me though, because with 1200 feet of creek claim area felt we hadn’t even begun. The disappointment for me was with three weeks of actual work time after dreaming this trip for the last 8 years along with a lot of preparation & trouble to get there, it just didn't seem right. HOPEFULLY someday I will get to go back to this same beautiful location. I’ll bring simpler equipment and have a few more weeks to test some of the areas that have my curiosity fired up. I don’t want to wait another 8 years.

Happy Diggin’ Craig Gifford, Rindge, NH



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GOD BLESS AMERICA
Posted by: Webmaster on Sunday, January 08, 2012 - 08:05 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

GOD BLESS AMERICA

Irving Berlin wrote this song in 1917 for use during WWI. Does anyone know why he did not release it then? He thought it "too sentimental even for the horrific inferno that was WWI. The link below will take you to a video showing the very first public singing of GOD BLESS AMERICA." But, before you watch, you should also know the story of the song.

The time was 1940.America was still in a terrible economic depression. Hitler was taking over Europe and Americans were afraid we'd have to go to war. It was a time of hardship and worry for most Americans. This was the era just before TV, when radio shows were HUGE, and American families sat around their radios in the evenings, listening to their favorite entertainers.

And no entertainer of that era was bigger than Kate Smith. Kate was also large in size, and the popular phrase still used today is in deference to her, It Ain't over till the fat lady sings. Kate Smith, with her voice coming over the radio, was the biggest star of her time. Kate was also very patriotic. It hurt her to see Americans so very, very depressed and afraid of what the next day would bring. She had hope for America, and faith in her fellow Americans. She wanted to do something to cheer them up, so she went to the famous American song-writer, Irving Berlin (also wrote White Christmas) and asked him to write a song that would make Americans feel good again about their country.

When she described what she was looking for, he said he had just the song for her. He went to his files and found a song that he had written, but never published, 22 years before - way back in 1917. He gave it to Kate Smith and she worked on it with her studio orchestra. She and Berlin were not sure how the song would be received by the public, but both agreed they would not take any profits from God Bless America" Any profits would go to the Boy Scouts of America.

Over the years, the Scouts have received millions of dollars in royalties from this song. This video starts out with singer Kate Smith coming into the radio studio with the orchestra and an audience. She introduces the new song for the very first time, and starts singing. After the first couple verses, with her voice in the background still singing, scenes are shown from the 1940 movie, You're In The Army Now. At the 4:20 mark of the video you see a young actor in the movie, sitting in an office, reading a paper - its Ronald Reagan.

To this day, God Bless America stirs our patriotic feelings and pride in our country. Back in 1940, when Kate Smith went looking for a song to raise the spirits of her fellow Americans, I doubt she realized just how successful the results would be for her fellow Americans during those years of hardship and worry, and for many generations of Americans to follow. Now that you know the story of the song, I hope you will enjoy it and treasure it even more. HERE IS HOW "GOD BLESS AMERICA" SHOULD BE SUNG!
http://www.israpundit.com/archives/31462?



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Hunting thru a Trash Dump By Mac E
Posted by: Webmaster on Sunday, January 08, 2012 - 08:05 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

Hunting thru a Trash Dump By Mac E

A couple months ago I had an opportunity to detect a friend's yard after the trees were cleared out. His house is about 12 years old, and it is next to a house that was built in the mid-1700's. My friend me warned about a former trash dump that was removed prior to the house being built.

With only a couple hours of day light, and not warmed up yet to focus around the old dump area, I went straight for the stone wall, common to the old house next door--not much found there, but I found some old bits of metal. Working away from the stone wall, across the driveway closer to the former trash dump, I found my first coin--a nice 1746 1/2 reale! At this point, with darkness setting in, I decided to work around the dump area. Surprised to find the area less trashy than I expected, I was able to work through the junk to pick up a surface clad quarter and a dateless Matron Head LC.

I was back three weeks later to finish searching rest of the property, but only to find a large spoon, large buckle, and the usual variety of bullets and shells. Not satisfied going home without finding any coins, I went back to the dump area to work in a slow and tight pattern. This effort paid off--I found two more coins, a 1719 KGI and 1752(?) KGII half pennies, a musket ball, two buttons, and two-and-a-half spoons.
Out hunting only a few times this year and being shutout most of the summer, I was thrilled to have found four pre-1840's coins. Now I wonder if I missed any Indian Head pennies or Liberty Seated dimes...

See pictures @ http://www.northeastmetaldetectingforum.com



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The Best Of Country Music Compiled In A Single Album
Posted by: Webmaster on Sunday, January 08, 2012 - 08:05 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

The Best Of Country Music Compiled In A Single Album

(NAPSI)—A new album release is designed to hit the right note with country music fans—particularly those who want nothing but the hits.

The world’s best-selling multi-artist album series, NOW That’s What I Call Music!, has released the highly anticipated fourth installment from the respected and successful NOW That’s What I Call Country series of compilation albums. The collection includes 11 No. 1 singles.

America’s Music

If you believe that consumers vote with their wallets, then music fans continue to vote in favor of country music. Consider the following:

• Country music was the dominant music radio format in the United States in 2010 with just over 2,000 stations around the country.

• According to the Country Music Association, Lady Antebellum trailed only Eminem in Nielsen Sound Scan’s top-selling, all-genre albums of 2010 as Need You Now came in at No. 2 with just over 3 million copies sold.

Though her third album, Speak Now, was released only 10 weeks prior to the end of the year, Taylor Swift finished 2010 as the third-best-seller of the year with just under 3 million sold.

• And as if to prove that country fans and artists are comfortable going “new school” when it comes to sales, in terms of all-genre digital singles sales, Lady Antebellum made the Top 10 with “Need You Now” selling 3.18 million tracks.

A Big Tent

Country music continues to be a “big tent” in the entertainment industry with room for all kinds of fans.

Maybe you are the type of fan who was country “before country was cool” and know the difference between a dobro and a pedal steel. Or maybe you couldn’t tell the difference between a honky tonk and a hoedown, but you like the stories and the sound of the songs. Either way, the creators of NOW That’s What I Call Country believe you’ll find something to like in this latest volume.

The album features 18 hit songs from the superstars of country music as well as the best new artists in the format.

Artists featured in the collection include Lady Antebellum (“Hello World”), Blake Shelton (“Who Are You When I’m Not Looking”), Sugarland (“Stuck Like Glue”), Carrie Underwood (“Undo It”), Keith Urban (“Put You In A Song”), Miranda Lambert (“Only Prettier”), Darius Rucker (“Come Back Song”) and everyone’s favorite honky tonk hero, George Strait (“The Breath You Take”).

Celebrated With A Sweep

To celebrate the release of the album, the label will sponsor a sweepstakes. One grand prize winner will have the opportunity to see and meet one of the NOW Country Volume 4 artists of his or her choosing live in concert. (Transportation not included and some restrictions apply.) Other lucky winners will receive a copy of NOW That’s What I Call Country Volume 4.

information, www.NowCountrySweeps.com.

A Multiplatinum Franchise

The NOW That’s What I Call Music! series is a joint venture from EMI Music North America, Sony Music Entertainment and Universal Music Group.

The NOW That’s What I Call Music! series debuted in the U.S. in 1998 after the brand had been a multiplatinum international success for 15 years. The series has generated sales exceeding 200 million albums worldwide, including more than 80 million copies in the U.S. Every album in the numbered U.S. series has reached Billboard’s Top 10, and 14 NOW releases have reached No. 1.

NOW That’s What I Call Country Volume 4 is distributed by Universal Music Group Distribution.

To learn more, visit www.nowthatsmusic.com.



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Get The Facts
Posted by: Webmaster on Sunday, January 08, 2012 - 08:05 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

Get The Facts

(NAPSI)—Relied on for more than a century, America’s best-selling reference book offers the answers to this year’s most pressing questions.

Which 2012 election candidate plans to lower the presidential salary to less than $40,000? How many millions of smartphones were sold in the United States over the past year? Which U.S. state has the highest public high school graduation rate? The answers can be found in The World Almanac and Book of Facts 2012.

Gracing the cover of this year’s edition is singer Adele, whose 2011 album 21 broke the record for most consecutive weeks in the Top 5 of the Billboard 200. She’s joined by the Yankees’ star shortstop Derek Jeter, whose milestone 3,000th hit was a home run.

The book also boasts a new feature on the Greatest Sports Upsets, with a list of the most surprising athletic outcomes of all time, inspired by Japan’s victory in the Women’s World Cup.

Shifts in the American population are illustrated by sections like “The Changing United States” while “Year in Review” recaps the top headlines, strangest news stories and most striking images of 2011. For more information, visit www.worldalmanac.com.



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Tips On Using Wi-Fi Hotspots
Posted by: Webmaster on Sunday, January 08, 2012 - 08:04 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

Tips On Using Wi-Fi Hotspots

(NAPSI)—Wi-Fi hotspots in coffee shops, libraries, airports, hotels, universities and other public places offer free access to the Internet.

However, public Wi-Fi networks often are not secure. You’re sharing the hotspot with strangers, and some could be hackers.

Experts at the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) say that when using wireless hotspots, it’s best to send only personal information that is encrypted—either by an encrypted website or a secure network.

Encryption scrambles information sent over the Internet into a code so that it’s not accessed by others. An encrypted website protects only the information sent to and from that site. A secure wireless network encrypts all the information you send while online.

To tell if a website is encrypted, look for https at the beginning of the Web address (the “s” is for secure), and a lock icon at the top or bottom of the browser window. Some websites use encryption only on the sign-in page, but if any part of the session isn’t encrypted, the entire account could be vulnerable. Look for https and the lock icon throughout the site, not just at sign in.

Is this hotspot secure?

• If a hotspot doesn’t require a password, it’s not secure.

• If a hotspot asks for a password through the browser simply to grant access, or asks for a password for WEP (wired equivalent privacy) encryption, it’s best to proceed as if it were unsecured.

• A hotspot is secure only if it asks the user to provide a WPA (Wi-Fi protected access) password. WPA2 is even more secure than WPA.

For a safer Wi-Fi experience, the FTC recommends:

• When using a Wi-Fi hotspot, only log in or send personal information to websites that you know are fully encrypted. The entire visit to each site should be encrypted—from log in until log out. If you think you’re logged in to an encrypted site but find yourself on an unencrypted page, log out right away.

• Don’t stay permanently signed in to accounts. After using an account, log out.

• Do not use the same password on different websites. It could give someone who gains access to one account access to many accounts.

To learn more about protecting your privacy online and what to do if your information is compromised, visit OnGuardOnline.gov.



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George Streeter Testimonials
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, November 21, 2011 - 06:38 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

"George has always been a very friendly and outgoing person. I have always known him to be a very down to earth and generous friend, ready to speak up and defend his friends. A very hard worker and dependable. Someone who is responsible, honest and trustworthy. I am always very proud to call him a good friend." - Steve Tetreault


"I'm happy to give George a testimonial but given his incredibly large circle of friends, its hard to believe he needs more - but that is typical George!

I've known him since 1974 and he is one of the most "happy go lucky" guys I have ever met. He is also the type who would give the shirt off his back to help someone. And if you like adventures, an outing with George will always be interesting and fun. One adventure that a group I joined and led by George had in St Thomas was, without a doubt, the best time I have had - others will tell you the same."

- Barry Shonbeck

George is a nice man. Sometimes a man of few words, he'll give you the shirt off his back. Just ask. George has a passionate hobby, treasure hunting and loves to live life and follow the adventure. He travels quite often, and demonstrates a compassion for the locals wherever he goes. George will always be a good friend of mine." - Chris Valerio

"My friend George has been one of the more interesting people in my life. He has a wonderful sense of humor, the same curiosity about the world around him as a kid (and I mean that in a good way). That intensity serves his desire to understand his surroundings very well. He has confidence and experience, and is a great teacher of the art of enjoying life. You can tell, because he smiles a lot." Jeff Orchard

"George is a wonderful person and friend with whom I am glad to be with at all times."

- Charles Anderson

"After spending a week 's time in St. Thomas with George, I must comment on how thoughtful and considerate he was towards me. I feel comfortable letting other ladies who love adventure, to give George a call and experience the unique and unusual with him."

- PATRICIA RODINSKY



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New Goldmaster Headphones!
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, November 21, 2011 - 06:38 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

In 2005 I started experimenting trying to build a better headphone for my Excalibur, and over the years it has evolved to the Goldmaster headphone!! The New Goldmaster headphones will unleash your detectors full potential by allowing you to now hear and interpret fringe signal targets that would be otherwise missed using the stock phones. The Goldmaster headphones are louder and clearer, with a much better low tone response + great noise reduction. All this adds to Lots of advantages over stock or any other available headphones out there. It's like having an audio Amp installed since the threshold can now be set to a lower setting, This allows the fringe signal targets to become more easily heard over the threshold

Gold Master details: dssussb@yahoo.com

. The New Goldmaster headphones are built using a High performance piezoelectric speaker system and a premium sound protector. This combination provides unsurpassed audio quality and extreme noise reduction, better then any other headphone available. Hear what you've been missing!! and Find out for yourself why more and more hunters agree that Goldmaster headphones are simply the best!! The New Goldmaster Headphones were designed by a professional water hunter, are hand made and assembled in the good Ole U.S.A. They're ready to be plugged into an Excal that has a battery end cap installed on the control tube.
The price for the headphones with male Ikelite waterproof connector is $229.

If Your Excal control tube is not set up for an Ikelite connector you can send in your headphone with end cap to have a new pair of Goldmaster headphones installed on your existing end cap and cable.

Your New Goldmaster headphone will reward you with more valuable finds faster then ever before!!
Many Thanks & Successful Hunting!!
Mr. Goldmaster

BELOW; comments sent in from Goldmaster headphones users.

+++OMG! Those headphones should be illegal! Put them on the blue tube 1000. Now I can hear everything! Can you make me a second set? I ask because now the factory phones on the other machine sound like garbage! your headphones make an Excalibur a different machine! Minelab should get a clue! A $1,200 machine should have headphone to match!
+++A very impressive set of phones--you have restored my faith in the Excal
Very nice audio, quite clean on targets and good on small stuff.

+++I now understand what people mean when they say that your headphones make their metal detector become alive. I could not believe how much I had to turn down the volume on my Sovereign. While I did not make any great finds. I was able to find very small targets in an area that was heavy search before. I know that I have a better chance of finding a target now because the target will give a better clearer audio response with your headphones!
+++The Mr. Goldmaster custom headphones are the loudest headphones I have ever heard! But its their ability to amplify subtle tones that will turn your Excalibur into the true sword pulled from the anvil!

Email Gold Master: dssussb@yahoo.com



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Metal Detecting - A few do & don’ts
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, November 21, 2011 - 06:38 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Submitted by Philip Oliver Holz


1. Take all the trash that you dig and discard it properly in trash receptacles. This is the environmentally correct thing to do. Besides, you might just end up re-digging the same targets at a later date, if you don’t.

2. Fill all holes that you dig, in parks, on the beach, and even in water, if you are active bathing beach site. This is a big problem, and can easily lead to the ruination of this great hobby. Learn good dogging techniques … ask if you do not know.

3. Make sure you have a metal detecting permit, if one is required.

4. Always use headphones. No one will hear the signal except you, so you won’t annoy beachgoers, bookworms, etc. Besides, using headphones increases battery life.

5. Don’t walk close to blankets, and be careful of windy days, which can blow sand that you are sifting onto the people on the blanket

6. Always obtain permission to hunt, when in doubt.

7. If possible, hunt with a partner in isolated areas.

8. Watch out for ticks & fleas; use OFF

9. Treat your detector like it is the household pet … don’t leave it in the trunk of your car during the hot summer months, and remember to keep it clean.

10 Always use a coil cover & clean it out regularly.

11. Always carry spare batteries.

12.. Let your spouse know where you intend to hunt in case of an emergency on behalf of either one of you.

13. You are not allowed to use your metal detector on National Seashore property.

14.Do not hunt on registered historical battlefields. If you do not heed this warning, take along some heavy duty reading material.

15. Watch out for electrical & plumbing lines.

16. Do not lean your metal detector against the wall or table, etc. (it may fall) . Either hung it on a wall or lie it flat where no one can step on it.

17. Never clean your finds (especially coins) until you’re ascertained their value. We have coin books & test kits& will be happy to test diamonds or gold for you at no charge.

18 When in doubt about anything, use common sense. Never take unnecessary risks and remember the Golden Rule: “Do onto others as you would have them do onto you“.

19. Never walk on the sand dunes. The following was taken from a sign at Sunken Forrest: Please stay off the sand dunes. What permanence there is on the ever changing barrier island comes from the beach grass. The grass traps windblown sand & binds the dunes together. Destroy the grass and the dune vanishes in the wind. When the dune is gone, the varied living communities once shelter behind it are exposed to the full fury of the salt spray & drifting sand. Walking just once over the dunes exposes the roots & kills the beach grass. This opens a small clink in the dune & the wind funnels through, creating bowl-shaped blow cuts. Dunes take years to form, they can be destroyed in a day. Help save our dunes by leaving them be. Use designated cross walks to the beach.

20. Remember no matter “how great” your metal detector is, it takes time to learn it: so take your time, pay your dues & practice.



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Beepin' About - What to Carry When Detecting
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, November 21, 2011 - 06:37 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Lately I have been taking a lot of pictures of where I hunt and putting them on the Internet metal detecting forums. The practice has been so popular and well accepted that I have been doing a little video as well. With the new software program called "Real Player and Real Producer," it is now possible to show video on the Internet.

Action on the Internet is always interesting and attracts more visitors to a web site than normal. I started by putting short video clips of the places I hunt on my web site. Then I did a few for some metal detecting forums. The results was astonishing. People love it and are demanding more. But, not to get off subject here. In order to take pictures, do video, and metal detect, too, requires carrying around more than usual. I mean, most of us carry a few things around besides just a metal detector. When you talk about carrying a video camera as well, it changes the perspective of things.

One of the folks on the forum brought up, "Just how do you metal detect carrying all that paraphernalia around, anyhow?"

My answer was another short video clip on what I carry on my person while detecting. Surprisingly I carry very little. The camera I use for video is a compact Sony High "8" 8mm handycam which is not much larger than a standard 35mm. On top of that, I carry it in a fanny pack that is designed to be a "finds" pouch as well. It fits snugly against my waist where after a while I am unaware it is even there. Usually I only tape when I am resting in between hunting so it is no problem.

I also have a still digital camera I slip in my pants pocket. It is not much larger than a pack of cigarettes yet holds 32 images at high resolution.

Then I carry a Walther P-380 double action automatic in my other pants pocket for security. Yes, I have a permit to carry it here in Florida. My pocket cell phone fits in my shirt pocket and for the most part I am holding my Lesche digger in my hand, but often I slip it in the rear pocket of my jeans. So, there you have it. I am free to metal detect but I am still able to tape action, take snap shots, stay in touch with civilization (often hunt in the boonies), and feel secure about being wherever I am, comfortably.

I carry water and usually a couple sandwiches if I am making an afternoon of a detecting trip, but that stuff usually stays in the vehicle. No sense in packing it along with you unless you are a ways back into the interior, in which I would have on a backpack and have much more than just sandwiches and water.

Speaking of backpacks, I always keep one in my little pickup truck just in case. It is always equipped with the minimum survival equipment like a snake bite kit, matches, and two cans of Beanie-Weenies. Yes, a backpack can take you a long way from your vehicle and not hinder you from metal detecting. I know some folks who use one and even pack along extra coils. Different sizes naturally.

Last but not least an extra set of batteries for the detector is a good idea. These I keep all the time in the camera fanny pack. Two sets actually: an extra for the camera and an extra for the detector.

That's about it. If you use your head you can metal detect light and still have everything that you need for an outing, including camera equipment. It just takes a little preplanning and some common sense.



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A few MAINE, NEW HAMPSHIRE, and VERMONT GOLD SITES
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, November 21, 2011 - 06:37 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Gold has been found in all parts of New England except Rhode Island. Recently a college geology class found a gold location in Connecticut which could become a major strike. Vermont gold is almost 24 karat! Generally speaking, many streams and bench gravels in Maine and a few in Vermont and New Hampshire are fairly good panning prospects. Streams draining the eastern slopes of the three states have the best potential. One authority thinks Vermont has the most potential.

MAINE:
....SWIFT RIVER and tributaries near Byron in Oxford and Franklin counties.
....SANDY RIVER - from Madrid to New Sharon in Franklin Ct
....PENOBSCOT RIVER - SOUTH BRANCH - in Somerset City near Bald Mtn, Sandy Bay
....and Prentiss
....BOWMAN - gold brook in Oxford City
....KIBBY - gold brook in Franklin City
....CHASE STREAM - gold brook, Somerset
....APPLETON - gold brook in Somerset City
....KIBBY STREAM - at Kibby in Franklin City
....ST CROIX RIVER - near Baileyville in Washington City
....RANGLEY LAKE - at Bog Stream just south of state park - in Franklin City
....CHANDLER HILL STREAM - tributary of Sandy River
....OXFORD COUNTY - Stow Deer Hill - Harvard Quarry in West Paris - Mt Mica
....(N from South Paris) - Pleasant Mtn at Denmark - BB #7 quarry at Norway -
....Greenwood area - Newry quarries near Andover and at Denton "pocket" nearby
....- Stoneham quarry at Albany - Nile Brook at Rangley

VERMONT:
....BRIDGEWATER - original mine and Ottauquechee River in Windsor City
....PLYMOUTH - original mine and area nearby in Windsor City
....ROCK RIVER - at Newfane and Dover
....WILLIAMS RIVER - at Ludlow
....MINISTER BROOK - at Worchester
....LITTLE RIVER - at Stowe and Waterbury
....GOLD BROOK - at Stowe
....MISSISQUOI RIVER - at Lowell, Troy
....WHITE RIVER - at Stockbridge or Rochester
....WEST RIVER - at Jamaica or Towsend
....MAD RIVER - at Moretown, Warren and Waitsfield
....SHADY HILL BROOK - at Wrightsville
....GIHON RIVER - at Eden
....LAMOILLE RIVER - at Johnson

NEW HAMPSHIRE:
....CONNECTICUT RIVER - also its tributaries
....AMONOOSUC DISTRICT - in the Lisbon area
....AMONOOSUC RIVER - below Bath
....TUNNEL BROOK - Near Benton



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Prospecting Tips
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, November 21, 2011 - 06:37 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

1. Do your homework! Start by going to the library and look into the history of where you plan to go on your prospecting vacation. The mineral bearing areas of every state have been well defined over the last 300 years or so. Gold has been found in varying amounts in every state in the union!

2. Study up on the geology of the area, look at the map. Find the streams and creeks that flow out from the gold bearing areas. Look for historic mines noted on the map. USGS topo maps, quad maps, are detailed enough to take you to the right place. Some of them haven't been updated in quite a long time so be sure to check the date and perhaps look for a detailed topographic map that is newer. DeLorme has a great series of maps that work for this quite well. GPS coordinates are very helpful as technology works for the prospector!

3. Use the Internet to find out current information on the areas you plan to visit. Look into joining a club and share in the member benefits. As a member many clubs and organizations will allow you access to proven gold claims. Forums and chat rooms are also great places to get educated in the fine art of prospecting.

4. Get out on the stream & look for the "signs". Gold is very dense and heavy compared to about everything else. Look for a bend in the stream or a rock that creates an eddy. Gold being heavy will collect in these areas. As the water slows around the bend or behind the rock, the gold drops out of the current

5. Gold, silver and platinum are deposited as an intrusion by volcanic pressures into fissures in harder material such as granite. Gold is associated with quartz because the same geologic forces are necessary to create both. Look for orange to yellow stains created by iron and copper oxides. These oxides are what create the "black sand", and being heavy, will be mixed in where you find the gold. Water and weathering erode the deposits and the gold being dense works it's way down to the lowest levels ultimately sitting on the bedrock. Look for places where the stream has cut down to the bedrock.

6. Glaciers eroding the mountain sides took the ore deposits and ground them up as they slowly slid down the valleys. These placer deposits have been historically the best place to find "free" or loose gold.

7. False bedrock... a layer of clay or dense material will act as a false bedrock and the gold won't penetrate that layer. Dig down to and then "skim" material from the top of that layer. Moss and roots will act as a trap for fine gold and small nuggets. Wash this material gently and thoroughly and replant it alive where you found it. Always fill in your holes, don't undercut trees and brush.Observe all State, U.S. Forest Service, B.L.M., US Corps of Engineers, and private regulations and all property rules concerning fires, tree cutting, littering, and mining.



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New Hampshire Gold
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, November 21, 2011 - 06:36 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Yes! New Hampshire has gold! However, to date, only small quantities have been found in some of the state’s bedrock (the solid rock under the soil) and in the gravels at the bottom of some streams (as placer deposits). When gold is found in the bedrock, it usually occurs in veins, long, narrow mineral rich “streaks.” It is removed by breaking up the rock and removing the gold.

OCCURRENCE

Gold is found in certain types of rocks, formed by geologic processes. The weathering of New Hampshire’s gold bearing bedrock broke the rock apart naturally. However, gold does not weather, and this allowed the more resistant gold pieces to be washed away by running water. Gold is approximately 19 times heavier than the same volume of water and gets left on the stream bottom with other heavy rock and mineral pieces.

Gold found in stream gravel, is known as a placer deposit. Panning and dredging are methods of separating the heavy gold flakes and nuggets from the stream gravels. Some gold panning and dredging has been done over the last 300 years of New Hampshire’s history, with varying degrees of success.

IMPORTANT NOTE: The water in a New Hampshire stream, brook, or river is considered to be “waters of the state,” however, the stream or river bed is privately owned by the individual(s) owning the land along the banks.

PANNING FOR GOLD IN NEW HAMPSHIRE’S STREAMS

Obtaining permission from landowners is more than simple courtesy; you are extracting minerals that are part of their property. Panners may not use a shovel to dig into the stream bottom or stream banks. Scooping gravel up with the gold pan is allowed. Mineral seekers in the White Mountain National Forest (WMNF) need to check out WMNF regulations at: http://www.fs.fed.us/r9/forests/white_mountain/recreation/minerals/. New Hampshire state lands, such as state parks, geologic and historic sites, etc., have rules regarding mineral collecting. See: Administrative Rule Res 7301.19 – Res 7301.21 at http://www.gencourt.state.nh.us/rules/state_agencies/res7300.html

RECREATIONAL MINERAL DREDGING

Dredging and the use of sluice boxes, involves disturbing the stream sediments, but on a larger scale than panning. Processing stream gravels in search of placer gold, releases fine sediments back into the stream. (Note the “muddy water” in the photo.) Sediment-laden streams can be an environmental issue. Therefore, certain regulations apply to this activity in New Hampshire. Dredging and similar operations are regulated by the state under statutes RSA 482-A and RSA 485-A:17 because of the potential for environmental damage.

PERMIT REQUIRED

Gold seekers who anticipate dredging, or similar work in New Hampshire, are required to obtain a permit. The application for a permit to operate a minimum impact small motor dredge for recreational mining of gold and other minerals under RSA 482-A and RSA 485-A:17.

For an application, click on: Recreational Mineral Dredging Application

One MUST obtain a permit and follow these regulations in dredging for gold in New Hampshire. Recreational panners also need to check the regulations and everyone needs the permission of landowners to access stream locations for panning or dredging. Detailed information regarding permitting may be obtained by contacting the NH Department of Environmental Services Wetlands Bureau, PO Box 95, Concord, NH 03302-0095; (603) 271-2147; http://des.nh.gov/organization/divisions/water/wetlands/index.htm .

WHERE TO LOOK FOR GOLD IN NH

Gold has been identified in placer deposits, quartz veins, and in metamorphosed conglomerate, especially the Clough Formation in the western side of the state. You can obtain a copy of the Bedrock Geology Map of New Hampshire, 1997, (Geo-NHX-250000-BMAP), showing the location of these rock formations, from NH Department of Environmental Services Public Information Center, PO Box 95, Concord, NH 03302-0095; (603) 271-2975; pip@des.nh.gov

The most well known New Hampshire gold deposits were described by C.H. Hitchcock in 1878. He identified the Ammonoosuc Gold District centered on Lyman, Monroe and Bath, including southwestern Littleton, northwestern Landaff and western Lisbon. See historic Hitchcock maps at http://docs.unh.edu/Hitchcock/pages/index.htm.

Smaller amounts came from the Diamond Ledge in Ossipee. Gold in the Ammonoosuc District is found in veins (mineral filled cracks in the bedrock) with sulfide minerals such as pyrite, and as “free” gold in quartz veins. Streams draining into the Connecticut River, especially from the confluence of the Ammonoosuc River at Woodsville north to the Connecticut Lakes, are all favorable for finding gold in placer deposits. The Baker River, draining into the Merrimack River is also reportedly favorable for placer gold.

New Hampshire gold pieces in placer deposits range in size from very fine “specks” to pearl size “nuggets.” In truth, hard work can probably produce traces of gold from many streams in the state. Gold has been reported from many streams in northern and western New Hampshire.


RESOURCE POTENTIAL

The Ammonoosuc Mining District is part of a belt that continues out of Vermont, up the Connecticut River north into Quebec. This belt comprises of bedrock, which holds the

highest potential in the state for important discoveries of gold reserves, as well as other metals. This belt is defined by metamorphic rocks, many of which were originally deposited as “volcanics,” which could have been in part, endowed with gold. The most intensive placer-recovery gold activity in recent years has occurred in surficial deposits (soils and stream sediments) within this belt.

Other areas, including the rocks of the White Mountains and similar rocks to the south such as those within the Pawtuckaway Mountains, are also favorable for gold prospecting. The potential also exists for the occurrence of gold along faults, especially those rich in silica minerals.

As with any hobby, talking and working with other enthusiasts will give you a great deal of information on locations and techniques. Additionally, New Hampshire has a number of active mineral clubs. An online search can give you their contact information. Good luck!

If you have questions, contact the New Hampshire Geological Survey, 29 Hazen Drive, PO Box 95, Concord, NH 03302-0095; (603) 271-1976; FAX (603) 271-

SUGGESTIONS FOR ADDITIONAL READING

Boudette, E.L., 1990, The Geology of New Hampshire. Rocks & Minerals Magazine, v. 65, no. 4, p. 306-312.

Heylmun, E.B., 1986, Ammonoosuc Gold District: California Mining Journal, (October issue).

Hitchcock, C.H., 1878, Geology of New Hampshire. Vol. 3: Part 3, surface geology; part 4, mineralogy and lithology; part 5, economic geology; and atlas.

Jackson, C.T. 1844. Final report on the geology and mineralogy of the state of New Hampshire with contributions toward the improvement of agriculture and metallurgy.

Meyers, T.R., and Stewart, G.W. 1956. The Geology of New Hampshire, part III, minerals and mines (with 1:500,000 scale map). http://des.nh.gov/organization/commissioner/pip/publications/geologic/geology.htm

Morrill, P. 1960. New Hampshire mines and mineral localities, 2nd ed., Hanover, NH, Dartmouth College Museum, 46 p. (Reprints available from

http://www.barilbooksandminerals.com/Click%20Here%20to%20View%20Our%20Book%20Selection.htm )

Pearre, N.C., and Calkins, J.A. 1957. Mineral deposits and occurrences in New Hampshire, exclusive of clay, sand, and gravel. U.S. Geological Survey, Mineral Investigations Resource Map 6.

The New Hampshire Geological Survey also has Mineral Publications and Aeromagnetic maps at http://des.nh.gov/organization/commissioner/pip/publications/geologic/documents/geo_publ.pdf



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ATTENTION PROSPECTORS
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, November 21, 2011 - 06:36 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

ATTENTION PROSPECTORS

Buying Black Sand (Magnetite)  

Chriswmcfee@gmail.com

Ph 603-831-8526



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Garrett Gold Scorpion
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, November 21, 2011 - 06:32 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Garrett Gold Scorpion

MORE THAN A PROSPECTING MACHINE

“While the name “Gold Stinger” implies that this latest addition to the Garrett line

has been designed strictly for prospecting, my experience in the field showed that it

performed extremely well in other applications as well. The 16-turn ground-balance

control combined with the full-range discriminate circuit and double-D elliptical

searchcoil allows the Scorpion to be used quite effectively for coin hunting, relic

hunting, and beach hunting.

“A full range of optional searchcoils is available...which allows the Gold Stinger fulfill nearly all of your treasure-hunting needs.”

MSRP: 549.95

Key FeaturesCircuit type: 15 kHz Groundhog circuitry, ideal for detecting small nuggets

Audio Threshold, Adjustable: adjust to user's preference with 10-turn control

User-adjustable Discrimination: for use with either Motion Discriminate or TR Discriminate modes to reject unwanted items.

Search Modes:

Non-Motion All Metal—Hover over targets in deepseeking, Non-Motion
All Metal mode. Balance out ground minerals precisely with the 10-turn
Ground Balance control

Calibrated TR Discrimination—Sample ore or check "hot rocks" in this
Non-Motion mode.

Motion Discrimination—Eliminate iron, foil and trash items with user-
adjustable discrimination. Automatic ground balance feature makes this mode ideal for coin hunting.
Belt Mount Configuration: Control box is detachable for alternate belt mount use (belt not included).

Retune Button: Press to reset the audio threshold as desired.  

Scorpion Gold Stinger Metal Detector Product No. 1194370.....MSRP: 549.95



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About Metal Detecting
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, November 21, 2011 - 06:30 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

From the Minelab website

Metal detecting is a fun outdoor activity that is rewarding in more ways than one; with fresh air, exercise and best of all valuable finds. Metal detecting can be either a hobby or a profession, and can range from coin, treasure and relic hunting to professional gold prospecting.

Coin, treasure and relic hunting
Coin, treasure and relic hunting involves searching for old coins, lost or buried treasure and relics from wars or ancient civilizations as well as recovering new coins and jewelry lost in public spaces like beaches and parks. Coin, treasure and relic hunting can be very rewarding as some finds can be worth thousands of dollars.

Because coin, treasure and relic hunting grounds are often places like parks, farming land and beaches they therefore tend to be littered with buried trash such as bottle tops, ring pulls and nails. Metal detectors can see all of these targets, but digging up trash is time consuming and unrewarding. To solve this Minelab has a range of metal detectors with the ability to ‘discriminate’ whether a target is likely to be treasure or trash. The discrimination feature on Minelab detectors measure two target properties, ferrous properties and conductive properties.

Ferrous properties refer to how much iron is in a target and therefore how strongly it’s attracted to a magnet. Ferrous targets tend to be trash, so they can be discriminated/masked out based on their ferrous properties alone by the detector. Conductive properties refer to how well a target conducts electrical current and therefore responds to a metal detector’s magnetic field. Trash like nails and foil have different conductive properties than valuable targets like coins and rings. In this case the metal detector can make a judgment as to whether the target is trash based on conductivity.



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The Garrett Story
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, November 21, 2011 - 06:30 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

When Eleanor and Charles first began selling and marketing their metal detectors in 1964, they focused on making the best metal detectors and selling them at a fair and reasonable price. Since that time, hey have been dedicated to making sure their customers are their number one priority.

The Garrett name has come to stand for more than metal detection; it is a philosophy for unparalleled customer satisfaction. While it is true that they believed then, as they do now, that their metal detectors lead the industry in capabilities and results, They recognized early on that commitment and loyalty to their customers would be their true source of success.

Now, as Garrett moves through the 21st century, the company has set goals to empower our customers with better products, better technology and better information. Garrett's mission is to continue the tradition of building great hobby and security detectors for many generations to come.



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The Minelab Excalibur - Part 2
Posted by: Webmaster on Saturday, August 20, 2011 - 02:43 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

The Minelab Excalibur-

By Chris Valerio

Part 2   In part one of The Minelab Excalibur I touched on why the Excalibur was the best all-around metal detector for finding gold in the sea.  The 17 frequency BBS technology, audio ID, Iron Mask and DD coil, makes for the right gold jewelry finding combination!  To choose one word to describe the gold finding abilities of the Excalibur, I would have to pick “Efficient”!  There is no other detector that can find as much gold jewelry in the sea and in the shortest period of time as an Excalibur, none!  I know because I’ve tried most beach machines and for all-around use by the average treasure hunter, the Excalibur is King!  But there are some trade-offs!  There simply is no getting around that.  First off, as great a detector as the Excalibur is, it will not detect the deepest of gold targets in the sea.  My PI goes deeper on gold.  Not by much though.  Secondly, the Excalibur is not the best at detecting micro gold jewelry.  It just does not have the gain or sensitivity for that.  Yet, the Excalibur goes deeper than most other detectors and I have found rings at 12 inches deep in wet salt sand!  And the Excalibur just loves gold rings!  In time and with some experience, on learns and knows the solid gold tone of an Excalibur, a sure bet!  Whatever the shortcomings, the Excalibur makes up for those easily with a gold finding ability second to none!  I’ve lost count on how many gold and platinum rings my Excalibur's have found!  Hundreds!  So I’m not too concerned about missing some deep or tiny gold, while on a limited time treasure hunting vacation with George Streeter.  No machine gets it all anyway, and besides one still has to put one’s coil over the target!  To me Excalibur's are the best all-around treasure hunting tools at the beach and in the sea.  Especially in the sea!  They are the detectors I grab first.  Later I may go back over the same ground with a specialty machine, such a my Infinium PI.  What I know for sure is that Excalibur's find gold quickly and lots of it and that makes me smile!

Another good word to describe an Excalibur is “Easy”.  Excalibur's are really easy to use.  Pretty much just set them and forget them, and that is very handy in surf conditions where one has enough problems trying to recover targets, let alone make detector adjustments!  One does not even have to ground balance an Excalibur!  Really, unlike most other VLF detectors the Excalibur works above average in the salt sand and sea and I think of this detector as my gold magnet!  With just a few minutes of instruction, even a beginner can find gold in the sand with an Excalibur!  Yet the Excalibur is also a complex unit.  No so much adjustment wise, but rather the Excalibur does speak a BBS language all its own.  A language that can be rather revealing once understood, and with use and practice that language is learned.  The classroom to learn this special language is in the field, where one never stops learning.  I call this becoming one with your machine.  In time with trained ears one can learn and hear the response of gold targets at the fringe of detection depth, where a beginner most likely would walk right over.  This ear for gold will develop over time and allow the user to make some fantastic finds and takes the Excalibur user to the next level, where even the slightest blurb of an audio response will alert the user of possible hidden loot!  However, even trained ears may only increase gold finds by 10 or 20%.  The Excalibur is that good, even for a rookie.

While there have been several books written on the subject of understanding the Excalibur, there really are no hush, hush, use secrets.  Many tend to overcomplicate this wonderful detector.  In doing so some try to turn the Excalibur into something it’s not.  If you want to get the most out of your Excalibur, the answer simply is to use it a lot.  And speaking of using it, there is no one right way to do so.  If something works for you, then do it.  The Excalibur is a very adaptable detector and is very forgiving to mistakes.  I believe understanding field conditions has more to do with machine performance than dial tweaking or technique.  While I’m good with an Excalibur, I know treasure hunters who are better.  They detect a lot, some everyday using Excalibur's!  To name the best is difficult and they scoop lots of gold!  Yet I find some of their tips and advice contradictory.  As an example one Excalibur expert says to hunt with a threshold so low it's nearly subsonic, while another equally talented user says to use a loud threshold.  One says to swing your coil very slow and the other faster!  I’ve tried most of the expert tips and know what?  They’re all right in different field conditions.  Sometimes a fast swing will work better.  Sometimes a low threshold is the way to go.  There are times to use auto sensitivity.  There are times to max out sensitivity and others to set it low.  Again with use one will learn how to set ones machine in different field conditions to maximize performance.  There is no better substitute than actual use in the field.  As with any detector, sticking with it is the key.  It’s easy to get frustrated and give up.  But with use you’ll become deadly with your Excalibur!  You may even surpass the experts in ability?  But as mentioned the Excalibur is a very forgiving machine.  Even set wrong, one can still find jewelry with it.  Enough to pay for the detector several times over!  So fret not you new Excalibur users.  If you seek at the right beach for gold with an Excalibur, you will find what you’re looking for, no doubt about it.  So long as you turn the machine on and swing the coil!  I know a treasure hunter who once searched 20 minutes with his Excalibur, only to discover it was not turned on!

As far as I’m concerned there are no real Excalibur secrets, just some basics when searching the salt chuck.  For 1, set your discrimination to 0.  One should not hunt with discrimination dialed in with an Excalibur.  You will learn to discriminate by ear and eventually be able to tell the difference between pennies, most pull tabs, bottle tops, silver and a gold rings.  Why I hear some Excalibur users can tell the mint date of different coins!  So the 17 frequency BBS (Broad Band Spectrum) Excalibur is foremost a sound machine.  Learn the sounds and you’ll find treasure!  I once let a 12 year old girl listen to my headphones while I swung the Excalibur coil in knee deep water for her.  This was the first time she had ever seen a metal detector and she caught on to the concept of treasure hunting rather quickly!  In a few minutes I demonstrated to her the various tones of metal targets and trained her little ears to a penny, a pull tab, a gold and silver ring.  Then we went detecting.  I even let her swing the coil on her own.  Heck, the machine was nearly as tall as she was!  She pointed out all signals for me to dig and predicted what the target was.  Even at her level of understanding, she got most targets scooped right!  As a matter of fact on one target and just after having correctly called an aluminum pull tab, her cute kid voice cried out gold ring!  My scooping revealed a small gold heart locket.  She got it right and I gave the prize to her.  This little girl was able to tell the sounds between a pull tab and a piece of gold!  So even a child can find gold with an Excalibur!

In all truth though, it’s not quite that easy.  Often some aluminum can sound like gold and some gold like junk.  Detecting is not an exact textbook science, as there are plenty of variables thrown into the pot.  But the Excalibur comes closer to textbook than any other water machine available.  So keep the discrimination at 0 and learn to discriminate by tone and target response quality.

Next is to keep the volume set at maximum.  At maximum volume you’ll simply hear treasure tones better.  Then, with the Excalibur I always set my threshold to where I can barely hear it, although some turn it down even lower and that may work OK.  But I do not like silent searching with an Excalibur.  The Excalibur is a sound machine and turning the threshold below auditable, takes away some of the BBS language.  I once heard a slight tick in the threshold which turned out to be an extra deep heavy 18K gold ring!  I never would have recovered that piece had my threshold been turned down to silent!  Now for the most challenging  setting, the sensitivity.  A beginner might want to start by setting sensitivity in Auto.  So set the Excalibur will tone discriminate better, but at the cost of some detection depth loss.  A good rule of thumb is to set your sensitivity in the 1 o’clock position, then go hunt.  As field conditions permit you may be able to turn up the sensitivity a bit, but the higher the sensitivity the more of a chance that there may be some ground penetration loss.  If your machine seems unstable, turn the sensitivity down a bit or give auto a try.  But I always start searching with my sensitivity at 1 o’clock and make adjustments from there as needed.  I know a treasure hunter who found lots of gold using his Excalibur set at the lowest sensitivity setting!  He even found a small 22k gold chain!  Finally in saltwater I never hunt in pinpoint or all-metal.  I always hunt in discriminate mode.                

So those are the basic Excalibur settings I use.  In discriminate mode discrimination at 0.  Volume at maximum.  A very low threshold and sensitivity set around o'clock.  That’s it!  Since I do 98% of my hunting in saltwater, I’ve found it is best not to raise and lower the coil as the Excalibur is prone to salinity changes and other electronic interferences.  So keep the coil as close to the bottom while detecting.  And that can be a challenge in some rough surf conditions!  I do try to scrub the sea bed.  The Excalibur can require a slower sweep to process the 17 multiple BBS frequencies, but sometimes too slow is too slow!  It is interesting that in my test garden my Excalibur will hit a quarter buried at 14 inches in hot soil, but only with a fast sweep!  When swept slow over the coin there is no response!  So when I hunt in the sea, I use a medium sweep speed.  If I hear an interesting whisper or promising target response, I’ll slow the sweep down and make multiple short passes over the suspected target area.  Some refer to this as the Sovereign Wiggle, the Sovereign being the land version of the Excalibur.  Often with an Excalibur multiple short passes over the target area, helps to reign-in or process a better target ID response.  Quite often a questionable target response comes in loud and clear after multiple passes with the coil.  (such as a gold ring sitting on top of a piece of larger iron)  With multiple passes the Excalibur is better able to analyze the target below and respond accordingly.  If I can’t bring the target in better with a slow sweep, then I try multiple passes with a faster sweep.  If this still gets no improved response, then if possible I scoop a couple inches of sand away from over the target and try the coil again.  Still no better response and I move on to better prospects.  With an Excalibur one wants to check out some of the better questionable responses, but within a reasonable amount of time.  I rarely linger over a target for more than 10 or 15 seconds.  In that time or less, I make a determination to dig or not.  If not I move on to cover more ground, bettering my chances.  Also, depending on how much time I have I may decide to cherry-pick targets.  That is I may only dig those responses giving gold range tones and passing over all iron and silver or coin responses.  With limited time this will maximize your gold finds.  But I must warn that in doing so, one might pass over a few gold targets.  As an example some large high Karat gold rings may respond in the silver range.  That’s why whenever I get a banger of a silver range tone, I dig it!  Twice now on silver range tones that came in very strong, they turned out to be large gold rings!  But this is not always so.  With limited time, cherry-picking does pay.  If you have lots of time then dig all responses in discriminate.  Less time, then scoop only gold range targets and all clean solid responses.  However know that just when you think you have things all figured out, you realize you don’t!  Often times, substandard responses turn out to be treasure!  Deciding to dig a target or not comes with experience and sometimes you will make the wrong decision.  At the end of the day and with several pieces of gold in my pouch, I can live with that realization.  Nobody gets it all!  On the other hand I have tried digging every target with an all-metal PI, only to collect a pouch full of junk and 1 gold to show for my efforts!  There is no doubt in my mind that tone discriminating with an Excalibur, is a far more productive way to fill you pouch with treasure!  You will miss a few good pieces, but that’s the way it is.  There is no doubt that in average conditions, an Excalibur will find more gold in the sea than any other water machine, in a given period of time.  The Excalibur is that good and efficient hitting gold!  So if there were any real secrets to using an Excalibur, I would say getting out and using it often would be it!

With that there are some things worth mentioning.  The more efficient or simpler I can make detecting, the more I will find. That is why I have experimented with Excalibur modifications.  I have changed the shaft, the headphones, batteries and coils.  In doing so I’ve come to some conclusions about such modifications.  By all means use your Excalibur as is, straight out of the factory box.  But if you ever tried a modified machine, you would switch.  The best mod one can do for the Excalibur is use a balance shaft.  Some refer to this as a straight shaft.  It just works better and especially in shallow water.  When using such a shaft there is at least 50% less fatigue while detecting in the sea.  So you can detect much longer.  You can order the best quality aftermarket balance shaft from Streeter Electronics.  Give George Streeter a call at 1-603-876-4443.  Really, that is the only Excalibur modification I would insist on.  There will be further improvement with some other modifications, but only by a small margin.  Custom Headphones by Mr. Gold Master will really pump up the volume!  Everything will be louder, crisper and clearer.  Plus GM phones cut way down on outside noises such as crowds, wind and surf.  I use them because I seek every advantage I can get, even if only slight.  GM phones are very nice, but not required.  However the Excalibur audio will be improved by using them.  Contact Streeter for more information on how to get your Gold Master headphones.  (1-603-876-4443)  

OK, let’s talk coils.  Currently the Excalibur coils are hard-wired.  (for waterproof integrity)  That means you can’t change coils.  The coil size you have is what you got!  Minelab offers a choice of 2 coil sizes when you purchase an Excalibur.  An 8 inch, model 800 (really closer to 7) and a 10 inch, model 1000.  Both coils are DD.  The latest versions of these coils are called Tornado and are thinner and more refined than earlier versions.  The good news about these 2 size coils is that they work great!  The big decision being if you want an 800 or a 1000!  I’ll get to that shortly.  

Because I often wonder if one can improve upon the Excalibur, I have experimented with different aftermarket coils designed for the Minelab Sovereign.  Those coils will work on the Excalibur, that is if you go through the hassle of either hard-wiring them or by using an aftermarket waterproof plug.  For my experimentation I used underwater plugs made by Bulgin.  You will find them with a bit of online searching, especially on the various treasure hunting forums.  Just know that switching to such a plug is a bit of a project, but handy folks can do it.  Once the plug is wired to your Excalibur and coils, switching coils takes only a minute to do!  Set up with Bulgin plugs, I tried 15 inch DD WOT coil, a 10X12 Butterfly coil and a 5 inch DD coil.  I also compared these to the factory 8 and 10 inch BBS and Tornado coils.  I tried all this on a blue tube Excalibur 1000.  What I discovered was that I really like the factory Tornado 800 coil and also the SEF 10X12 butterfly.  In my test garden the butterfly coil goes very deep, but I have not confirmed this shallow water hunting.  On land the SEF coil will go deeper than the Tornado 1000.  I was not that impressed with the 15 and 5 inch coils.  As such I have concluded that most aftermarket coils are not worth the effort to install on an Excalibur.  But it’s sure nifty to swap coils on demand.  Yet, I would advise new Excalibur users not to do it.  For the most part spend your time hunting rather than tweaking coils... unless you are crazy like me!  The 1 thing you should do to your coil is to remove the coil cover, which tends to collect sand and other minerals.  Then sandpaper the coil bottom lightly and spray it using a can of truck bed liner spray, 3 coats.  This tough material will last long protecting the bottom of your coil.  Just touch it up as needed.  The best part is that you no longer need to use your factory supplied coil cover!  And that means no more washing sand out of the cover!  I like that as sometimes the cover can be a bear to remove!  I’ve also experimented with an electronic audio amplifier and a ferrite cable filter on an Excalibur, with nothing to write home about.  The ferrite filter did little of anything and while the AMP booster held some promise, it was just too difficult to adjust in the sea.    

With gold prices today pushing $1,800 you should easily pay for your new Excalibur.  Just go to a popular beach and search for gold and eventually you will find it.  Especially with a positive mental attitude and an Excalibur in shallow water.  But now we are back to the big choice you will have to make, an 800 or 1000.  At this point I might as well reveal my favorite Excalibur.  The Excalibur II 800!  The Excalibur II is more stable than and goes deeper than the previous blue tube version.  The Tornado 800 coil is better than the older 800 BBS coil.  It’s more sensitive to smaller gold.  Since it is thinner it also glides better through the water!  The newer yellow Koss phones work pretty good and I would be perfectly happy detecting with a stock Excalibur II 800.  Since I hunt mostly shallow water I prefer the smaller 800 coil.  It’s easier to swing underwater and works better in rocky areas.  Plus the 800 Tornado coil goes pretty deep!  And despite its smaller footprint, I have found more gold with the 800 coil than the 1000 in the sea.  Underwater the 800 coil is much more forgiving than the 1000.  You can swing the 800 faster, set the sensitivity higher and pinpoint your target better.  Yup, an Excalibur 800 II straight from the factory would be tough to beat!  Now if you only hunted dry and wet sand and rarely in the water a 1000 would be a good choice.  However, I would be more likely to choose a Minelab Sovereign hip mounted, with SEF 12X10 butterfly coil for such tasks.  But for general shallow water hunting the 800 II is my machine of choice.  If I had to pick 1 machine that would be it, a great all–around choice!  Please feel free to email me with any questions. questions.  Email:  cabochris@msn.com.  I also strongly urge you to contact George at Streeter Electronics for great deals on Minelab detectors.  When you do business with George, he becomes your friend!  You may even be invited on one of his next treasure hunting vacation.  The information divulged on his trips is worth thousands of dollars!  You’ll also rub shoulders with some fine treasure hunting brothers and sisters.  (Streeter Electronics:  www.streeter.org or 1-603-876-4443)  In Excalibur part 3 we’ll touch on some field techniques and more of my opinions.  Scooping gold from sand and sea is a wonderful hobby that pays.  Get your share of the booty  with an Excalibur! And as always, may the gold be with you!  CC.



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Top 7 ways to get Kicked off a Plane
Posted by: Webmaster on Friday, August 12, 2011 - 04:18 PM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Top 7 ways to get Kicked off a Plane

In many ways, air travel is a more casual affair than it was in earlier decades, when people used to treat flying like going to the opera. But along with the increase in cheap fares has come increasing incidents of bad behavior getting people kicked off planes.

You know not to bring liquids through TSA security and to have your ID ready, but you might want to read up on some of the things that have resulted in passengers being removed from the aircraft and even arrested.

1. You are dressed provocatively. So what exactly does “provocative” mean? Well, wearing something too tight or revealing (as Kala Ebbert was when she was booted from a Southwest flight in 2007,) too political (such as a T-shirt with profanity or a bold political opinion printed on it,) or too loose. Yes, that is right: loose. On June 15, 20-year-old Desha Marman was removed from a US Airways flight for wearing low-slung pants that exposed his boxer shorts. (Inexplicably, US Airways had previously allowed a man wearing little more than women’s undergarments to fly from Fort Lauderdale to Phoenix on June 9, despite complaints from other passengers.)

2. You use profanity. Robert Sayegh of Brooklyn was kicked off a Delta flight June 12 for dropping a couple of f-bombs in a conversation with a fellow passenger. He was escorted off the plane at Detroit Metro Airport by police. Though Sayegh admitted to being hung over, he attributed his colorful speech patterns to being a Brooklynite.

3. Your personal hygiene is substandard. In February 2010, Air Canada removed a man from a plane for excessively foul body odor, and British Airways removed a German man from a flight originating in the U.S. because of complaints about his personal smell.

4. You refuse to stop testing. Actor Josh Duhamel was removed from a New York-to-Kentucky flight in December 2010 when he would not turn off his BlackBerry after being asked to do so by flight attendants three separate times.

5. Your toddler is too talkative. In 2007, 19-month-old Garren Penland and his mother were removed from a Continental flight after a flight attendant complained that the toddler was talking too much during the safety speech. Continuing the traveling-with-babies theme, Emily Gilette was removed from a Delta flight in 2006 for not covering her baby’s head (and the breast, presumably) while she was breastfeeding. While all airlines allow breastfeeding during a flight, many ask that it be done as discreetly as possible.

6. You are intoxicated. While obviously drunk and disorderly passengers are routinely kicked off flights, sometimes slightly inebriated passengers are escorted off, too, as was the entire Russian Junior Hockey team in Buffalo last January.

7. You are too large. A 6-foot-9 man was removed from a Horizon Air flight in March after he was unable to secure a bulkhead seat with enough legroom to accommodate his long limbs. Also, Clerks director Kevin Smith was removed from a Southwest flight in February 2010 when he was unable to purchase two seats to accommodate his girth on a standby flight from Oakland to Burbank. Many airlines require passengers who are too large for a seatbelt extender to purchase two seats.



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Metal Detecting Tips
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, July 11, 2011 - 08:46 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Printed with permission from John Barrows Coinist's Metal Detecting website

If you can learn from advice - -I would like to relate some of the things that I have learned over the last 22 years detecting. Oh, if only I had known these things when I started

1. If you are going slow , go slower yet. What's the hurry and maybe the goodie of the day is right where you leave off.

2. Learn your detector's sounds or readings. Practice frequently to know them.

3. Don't move on to another detector just when you are starting to learn the one you have. It doesn't matter what others are saying about the "latest" machine.

4.Dig up some of those "sure it's not a goodie" signals. You will be surprised once in a while.
5. Detect some of those places "where no one would lose something".

6. Write down a good looking spot when you see it. Don't rely on your memory.

7. When a temporary site opens for you do it now. Call in sick, lie to relatives, do whatever, but get to it, before the window closes.

8. If you have a real strong hunch about a site - do it. Don't let others persuade you to go elsewhere. Our hunches are frequently more than a guess.

9. If you have a good looking place to hunt and there's people walking by or such - don't let their presence bother you. What do they matter ? I have had guys refuse to go with me because others might watch them.

10. No matter where you go out of town, ALWAYS take the detector along. Some of the greatest spots open up when we don't expect it.

I hope someone can learn these things sooner than I have. Good hunting, Posted on Coinist's MD Forum March 20, 2002



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Metal Detector Hot Spots Still Exist By Bob Lewis
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, July 11, 2011 - 08:45 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Do you really think treasure hunting in Cheshire County or your area, is a thing of the past? Do you hunt all day and come home with nothing more than a handful of Clad? Are you getting frustrated with Metal Detecting and wouldn't buy another Detector if your life depended on it?

Well, step back and take a good look at what you are doing or better yet, what you are not doing to improve your chances of finding that nice old Colonial Copper. They are out there and ready for the picking. You need to look back at what got you so interested in this hobby in the first place. You didn't know squat about what you were doing and had a ball learning. First by digging all signals like you were told to do when new at this. Also by finding the first old silver and first old copper got you so excited you couldn't wait to show someone. This is not all gone you know. The excitement of the first new find is still alive. You just have to get your head straight & do it.

I find old coppers all the time. I hunt where you've hunted & I hunt where you haven't hunted. Makes no difference. If the coppers and Silver are still there (and they are) Someone is going to find them. Why not motivate yourself into working harder on those so called hunted out spots. Why not motivate yourself into finding new Turf. And I don't want to hear its too late in the year. I hunt until, I can't get a hole in the ground any longer.

I got real lucky this summer and so far, have found 70 to 80 Large coppers. 31 Of them came from one field. A total of 57 coppers none newer than 1788. Oldest by visible date 1736 were taken by my hunting Buddy and myself.

We are always looking for new turf and when we see something that looks inviting we find the owner. What we do not do is see a new place and say boy I'd like to hunt that one. We'll have to put that one on our list. Hot spots do exist. you just can't quit looking.

By the way, I mentioned something about buying a new Metal Detector in the beginning of this Article. That might not be a bad idea. When I buy a new detector I go back to some of my old spots just to see if the new machine can out do the old. And you know what? Most times it does. Why? Because you are back to square one, learning all over again and digging all those signals to see what they are. Just like you were told to do in the beginning....

Remember.... Bob Lewis



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Hunting 2010
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, July 11, 2011 - 08:45 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Hi Folks Don Tyler {Co Co} here, This year metal detecting had taken a slight change for me. I got more into land detecting then I ever did before. But before I get into that I will talk about my water hunting tales. I try to get to the Islands or Mexico a couple of times a year with my wife Patricia. In April we headed to the area south of Cancun Mexico. We usually go to an All-Inclusive Hotel. Makes it easier for us. The place we stayed at was for adults only. Not a very large resort but overall very nice. I did my water hunting while my wife stayed by the pool. I did not find that many gold rings as I have found in the past at other Resort areas. Two of the rings I found were enough to make any water hunter happy. I ended up with a nice 14k white gold diamond ring. and a real nice Tiffany& Co. 950 Platinum men's ring. I ended up going to another resort that I have been to before for the day. I had to pay like $60 to spend the day but again it is All -Inclusive. While I was out in the water I ran into another hunter that was from New Hampshire. He was not having any luck, but that does not discourage me. I went in the water and stayed for about 5 hrs. and came out with a nice 14k gold medallion and a men's 14k gold ring along with silver rings and coins. The hunter from New Hampshire could not believe what I had found in such a short time hunting, since he had been hunting all week. What he was hunting with was a very low end detector that only had a single frequency and was falsing a lot. I ended up telling him to save up some money and get a better detector so he can pay for part of his trip with his finds. I suggested the Minelab Excalibur 800 or 1000 detector. I told him I have used many water detectors but I always end up using the Excal detectors. As we were heading home my wife told me she would like to go out to California and visit her sister for a week in July. I had to think fast for a good suggestion on how I could still metal detect some place tropical knowing I did not want to go to California for a week. I said to her what if I cash in some of my gold and have your sister go with us on vacation. And she said, " You Would Do That ". I said of course, knowing I would be spending more time in the water due to the fact that my wife had someone to keep here company by the pool. It ended up working out for all of us. My extra time spent in the water got me 9 beautiful Gold, rings mostly 18k gold. One was a spinner ring 14k gold, along with silver rings, tungsten rings, and coins. After that I went back home and started hitting lakes and ponds in the area.

I did not find as many Gold rings as I usually do but kept looking . I then went up to visit my friend George Streeter to see what he had at his shop.

I started checking out his land detectors saying if I can't find gold I can find coins. There were many makes and models of detectors to choose from. I ended up with the Whites V3i detector. My reason of choice was due to the fact that the detector could go deep and was sensitive to gold chains. It felt well balanced and you could make it a custom style detector if wanted to make adjustments to the already programs already built into the machine. As usual George streeter gave me a great deal on the detector. Now, I had to go out and see how to use it. For the rest of the summer I hunted with a very good hunter & friend Scott Foreman. Scott is very good at using his Tesoro Pulse Machine, and his Minelab Exterra land machine. We ended up hunting areas that Scott got permission to hunt. If it wasn't for Scott I probably would not have found some of the coins I ended up with. He spent many of his off days going around places to ask permission. Scott would give me a call and say "I found a spot we can hunt" off I would go. It takes me almost an hour to get down to these places but it was always worth it. Most of the time Scott wound up on top with some real nice finds. First time out in the woods about a mile in, he found a nice old Colonial coin, then another one he found was a 2 cent piece along with a couple of Colonial coins. I did not find that many old coins but I did get to see some that Scott was able to find. We had a good time hunting thanks to Scott sharing his spots with me.

Questions, email CoCo Tyler beachcomber369@msn.com



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Selling GOLD ARA Pays 98%
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, July 11, 2011 - 08:44 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

 

Can't you slow down long enough to be paid for all your gold? You have accumulated for years waiting for this day. Gold is at record highs. The time is now and you are considering taking it to one of the new places that have sprouted up. Why? Because they can settle you in record time. You have waited this long. Don't you want the full compensation for your efforts?

Fact: Many of our competitors are using X-ray equipment capable of making payment to you within minutes. These machines are in many cases being calibrated to report a lesser percentage on the readout.

All processing at ARA is done at our facility by hard working, honest, loyal individuals who chemically process your material to pure, then payment is made. FULL TRUE recoveries with no deceptions. Stone removal is where we excel. In 3 days we will have recovered your fine gold, all your stones, frosted your CZs, and have them on their way to you with payment in tow.

ARA is a family-owned business. I have run the company with my sons since 1994. We do not have a sales force, nor do we invest in trade shows, yet 15 years later we have grown tenfold. Why? Because our customers have referred people, who have referred others, and the referrals continue to this day. We have to take care of each of you - our growth depends on it!

Give us the opportunity to show you the true meaning of service, because at ARA you are everything to us, large or small.

American Recycling 2431 Walnut Ridge St., Dallas, TX 75229, Phone Number: 1-800-216-9796, Fax 972-620-9962 Email: nicki@aragold.com


What We Do

Stone Recovery/Stone Frosting/Assay Services with no additional fees

Refining Precious Metals including Gold, Silver, Platinum Group Metals and more. (for the jewelry and pawn industry)

Settlement Options

Upon completion, your options for settlement are a check or your metal returned. You also have the option of pooling your metal and watching the market for settlement at your discretion.

With 30 years of experience and 14 of those years as ARA, we have grown over the years because of honesty and integrity. All processing is done in house to pure using aqua regia digest. Stones come out without breakage, CZs are frosted and all stones are returned to you. You can either take your pure gold back or take payment via check or bank wire. We also offer pooling which gives you the opportunity to watch the market and settle at your discretion.

What can we say to set us apart? We ask that you give us the opportunity to service you and from there you take over for us because you will want your friends in the industry to profit as you did from our services. That's why we take care of you; we depend on you to spread the word around for us.

So try us & talk about us. We depend on it.



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The Flux Of Metal Detector Technology
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, July 11, 2011 - 08:44 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

The Flux Of Metal Detector Technology

By JasonSPAZ1 & from NEMD Forum


The metal detector industry is in an odd state of flux. For a few years I have been asking in the forums and warning the Metal detector industry that it is a matter of time before some other "third party" manufacture gets it RIGHT and blends today's iPhone, iPod, similar device technology(including battery technology) into a metal detector.

It was a pleasant surprise to see Minelab introduce The E-Trac with USB technology. Well does anyone even use the feature? I don't see other E-Trac forums on fire with great programs to exchange. You know why?, They made it to difficult from what I see and hear. I have heard that the software is not easily navigated. To me it sounds like the E-Trac exchange programs, are as easy as putting together Lego's with boxing gloves on. And how about The new whites machine. They are talking about some accessory "dongle" LOL... To be sold at a later time to unlock the ability to attach the V3 to your PC. I would hope that this "dongle" LOL.... will be a reality since it sounds like vapor-ware to me.

So the detector industry wants to catch up with modern times. First off lets start off with some mini Cam-Corder credit card sized battery system. Lets have some LCD's with the solid "unscratchable" LCD Jewel, used in mp3 players or hand held police radios. Lets get a complete weather proof package, with at least an LCD displaying the time of day. Basic stuff that the industry leaves out of their machines is an oddity to me. We need bare bones RAW POWER in a hi-tech package garnished with the bells and whistles that matter. The industry has yet to solve screen glare, but an I-pod has? The amount of money these machines cost, that still run on 8AA batteries is getting crazy! I know the manufactures want to get current, but in their attempt to prove that they know what a PC is, we only get re-housed familiar machines. Imagine a detector if you will. ALL Metal and disc tone id, Notch disc, TRUE automatic ground balance, pinpoint, and adjustable single or multi frequencies.....and that's it bare bones right at your fingertips

NOW THE GOOD FEATURES! Housed in a true weatherproof package, with a LCD that wont glare or scratch which is bold and visible, blazing fast processor for instant "no lagging response" target response, a small credit card sized battery like the mini cam corders use. a couple gigs of memory (to store a virtual memory of targets encountered) and easy detector adjustments on your PC monitor thru USB ( done right and easy with "compatible" windows software) Bare powerful bones in a truly modern package.. No need for all these current Next Gen machines which have an imbalance of technology and UN-user-friendliness. The screens still glare, target response is to slow, and to many cumbersome navigation of menus within menus to adjust something as simple as volume. All that ends up being used is An All Metal Mode with ferrous tones on or off. All that money spent to run in an all metal mode, for best results? Perhaps the good machines are coming, Perhaps Garrett one of the wealthiest but stuck in a rut with 15+ year old designs will throw us a curb ball. Or maybe some third party will throw its hat into the industry & surprise us all. The technology I speak of is common place, & affordable to today's consumer. Their isn’t a reason a 1,400 detector of today can not have it Just my opinion and I don't mean to offend anyone In the end whatever works for you is the best choice. I stick with my old faithful until something truly impressive comes along.

" If you walk away still thinking of it. Go back and dig it "



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The Elusive Bottles of North East Vermont
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, July 11, 2011 - 08:44 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

The Elusive Bottles of North East Vermont

By Javin Leonard

My brother Jon Leonard and myself are generally early colonial coin hunters. But this summer we had come to the sad realization that we have pretty much hunted out the sites in and around the towns that we live in. We had a few new sites that we had found in the early spring but they revealed little in the coin department. So we decided to check into hunting for bottles at all the sites that we had previously hunted for coins. After a lot of hard work, Christmas came early this year. But first we had to pay our dues.

After two weeks of trying to figure out where dumps might have been, or the privy at all the cellar holes that we new of, we had very little to show except a lot of broken glass, red wear, and broken spirits. We did manage to find a few newer bottles of the late 1800’s to early 1900’s, but nothing of the caliber that we were hoping to find. We were looking for the elusive pontiled, early 1800’s variety but to no avail. Here and there would be a clue to wet our lips, some signs of ale bottles, chestnuts, strap sided flasks, and other. But no whole bottle to show for the time that we had but in. And trust me, we had a lot of time into it. At this time we both were between jobs and would spend full days checking and rechecking sites that revealed the most hope. But so far the closest that we came were the fragments of what we were looking for and one site that someone beat us ! to and already dug up the good stuff and left behind the newer bottles. After not having much to show except some hefty blisters, we decided to call it quits on hunting for bottles and went out coin hunting.

After retiring from the bottle hunt we picked up the metal detectors and had a discussion about how we could easily find a two hundred and fifty year old silver coin but couldn’t find hide nor hair of an early bottle anywhere close to being whole. That night sure enough we found two colonial coins, a wheaty, and an Indian head in one hour at a site that bulldozers and skidders had wrecked havoc on, but in two weeks we couldn’t find a single bottle of the era that we were interested in.

The next night my brother says that we should go back to a cellar hole that we had found some newer bottles at to search for some early bottles. It was with much hesitance that I decided to go along because in my mind we were never going to find an early bottle there. There was too much newer evidence of later occupancy around and never a colonial coin or button. That was my opinion anyway so when we got there I decided to scour the hillside for an Indian head while my brother insisted on the hopes that there was a dump there and there had to be bottles there to. What was to come next was a complete surprise.

I was about fifty yards away from my bother and niece who came along for the day, when my brother started to yell my name. I figured he couldn’t have found anything to important and walked casually back towards him still scouring the ground for an Indian head. When I finally got to where he was digging a pretty good size hole in the ground, he held up to me a pontiled inkwell of beautiful color but with a broken neck. It was definitely in the era that we had been hoping to dig up. “This is it” he said, “this is the privy”. He then explained to me how he just leaned over this fallen tree and set his metal detector to the ground when it all of a sudden just started to light up like there was something large in the ground. Then after digging a foot and a half down, this ink well just popped right out of the ground.

“There is more down here” he explained “there is more glass and large metal objects”. He had revealed some large metal pots in the ground and some broken glass that I could clearly see. My brother then proceeded to pull out clear pontiled bottles like they were just stacked in there. Sure enough it was just that, they stacked and filled these metal pots with their garbage. They must have just filled the privy full before filling it in and moving the outhouse.

Inkwells of all different shapes and sizes, as well as bitters bottles, medicine bottles, magic cough remedies, and more. At this point most were clear or of aqua color. We were all clearly excited to see our first pontiled bottles just rolling out of the ground when all of a sudden my brother pulls out the most beautiful Stoddard blacken bottle. The most impressive thing was the thousands of bubbles and crude attachment of the neck. That’s when both my niece and I then jumped down to our knees and decided to get in on the digging. This is when my brother pulls out a pot and rips the lid off. And before he can get his hands on any of the bottles inside, my niece and I had all the bottles in our possession. The most impressive of them were a Stoddard inkwell and olive green blacken bottle that still had its original cork.

I looked down at the time and I was due to help my oldest brother with his roof. That is when Jon looks at me and says, “To hell with the roof, keep digging!” After about another hour we had cleaned the hole out. About 25 bottles with pontils, 10 inkwells, one blacken bottle, one Stoddard bottle, one Stoddard inkwell, a red ware pot, and one ink well of a unique color that we have come to find that its worth is around a thousand dollars were now safely in our possession. Not a bad haul for just a few hours of digging in a hole no bigger than two feet deep and four foot in diameter. We also hauled out a five-gallon pale of broken bottle pieces that we hope to glue together as a winter project along with a giant red ware container with a lid.

Now we have renewed hopes of finding more at all our old sites and have a better idea of what we are looking for when hunting for bottles. Find the privy! We also have learned that no matter how many times that you can go to one site, there is always some treasure left behind because we haven’t looked hard enough or long enough.



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Worthy Accessories
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, July 11, 2011 - 08:44 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

By John Quist, Administer of

NE Metal Detecting Forum

You’ve bought that state-of-the-art metal detector from George or God forbid! someone else, . You are raring to go, however wait; there are a few more things that you need to stock up on, in order to make your hunting, successful & comfortable. These are just a few things that help make the day a pleasant one.

Digging

You have hit the signal of a lifetime and now what? You have to get it out of the ground! I my opinion, you need a good shovel and a hand digging tool. Anything with the Lesche name is going to give you long-lasting quality and design qualities made just for the detectorist.

Hand Digging Tools: The Lesche hand tool surpasses all the other brands both in performance and is virtually unbreakable. My only complaint with it is that the serrations are on the side of the blade best suited for a lefty. You have to take the tool to a person handy with metal working tools in order to put the teeth on the side that works best for a right-handed person. Other than that, like all Lesche products it is built of the best materials and is virtually indestructible.

Shovels: Although many magazines and books warn against carrying a shovel, (for appearance sake) in my opinion they are very helpful and do minimal damage if you are careful. Lesche again makes the best quality products anywhere. Whether you choose the Sampson, 38D, Ground Shark, Relic Hunter GS, Ball, or T-Handle, is merely of personal preference. Lesche’s quality steel will give you a lifetime of performance.

Other Stuff: I like to bring along, a plastic trowel for that final dig when the treasure is at close hand. Scratching that seated liberty with a metal tool would be a sad thing indeed. A plastic trowel helps minimize damage.

Probes

Our free time and opportunities to detect are minimal at best in these busy lives. An electronic pin pointing probe is a great way to locate hard to find treasure (or trash) quickly and go on to the next hole. The best option, if you are lucky enough to have a detector that takes one, is a Sun-Ray inline probe. The Sun-Ray probe plugs into the circuitry of your detector and works off the detectors electronics – meaning – your probe has the same discrimination as you detector. If you don’t have that setup, a hand-held probe is a good option that will save time and effort while you are extracting that goodie. Not only will it make your hunting quicker, you will do less damage to the turf. There are many brands available: Detector-Pro, White’s, and the Garrett Pro-Pointer. In my opinion, the Garrett Pro-Pointer is the best option, being both durable and effective.

Other Stuff, Knee pads are handy and make the day less tiring. A decent belt mounted trash-treasure bag insures that you have a place to properly carry out metal trash and is a great place to put your plastic trowel, rose pruning shears and a water bottle. Those rubber coated garden gloves are great for keeping your hands clean. A Hand-held GPS is a wonderful tool if you can afford one. A camera is handy for taking pictures of the site and the treasures found. Always carry some plastic bags, film canisters, or medicine bottles for keeping the good stuff. Water on a hunt is super important if you have no access to refreshments. One may ask: What is the most important thing that you can bring on a hunt in the woods, miles away from civilization? It is this…a Ziploc bag with toilet paper!!! Happy Hunting!!!

John Quist   E-mail john.a.quist@gmail.com



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Minelab GPX-5000 Gold detector
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, July 11, 2011 - 08:43 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Minelab GPX-5000 Gold detector

More new features and functions make the GPX 5000 the best gold detector in the world!

The GPX 5000 sets the new benchmark in gold detecting technology. With an amazing range of features and functions the GPX 5000 is not only superior to its predecessor, the GPX-4500, and is in a class of its own. Featuring Minelab's exclusive technologies, Multi Period Sensing (MPS), Dual Voltage Technology (DVT) and Smart Electronic Timing Alignment (SETA), the high performance GPX 5000 is capable of finding more gold than ever before. From sub-gram nuggets to the elusive 'retirement nugget' and everything in between, with the GPX 5000, you can find it.

New improved electronics, new Soil/Timings and an amazing range of features combined with the legendary GPX ability to ‘see through ground’ mineralization, gives you a significant Depth Advantage over other detectors.

Using unique features, functions and industry leading patented technology ensure the GPX detectors run smooth and quiet in even the most severe ground conditions, whilst still maintaining excellent depth and sensitivity to gold nuggets. Serious detectorists know that GPX detectors find gold much deeper than ANY other detector, in ALL ground conditions. That's why we are confident to say we have the GPX Depth Advantage.  

With more Timings than ever before, the 8 Timings available on the GPX 5000 change the digital switching and processing of the electronics in the detector. Each Timing has been designed for optimum performance under certain conditions, so it is like having a different detector each time you select a new Timing.
Also great for the specialist relic & jewelry hunter who demands the best, and wants to recover targets deeper than ever before.

Easy for the beginner through to the professional - you can switch on and go with six factory preset Search Modes and automatic functions.

Features:

MPS, DVT & SETA Technology delivers to you the most technologically advanced detector yet, making small hard to hear nuggets more obvious. New Timings make the GPX 5000 the most versatile ever. It's like having 8 detectors in 1. In addition to five of the Timings found on the previous model the GPX 5000 introduces three new Timings: Coin/Relic, Salt/Gold and Fine Gold. Fine Gold Timing gives even more depth and sensitivity than Enhance — bring home more nuggets even from ground thought to be completely worked out! Salt/Gold Timing is great for all nugget sizes in salty ground — outstanding at the beach! Coin/Relic Timing is the deepest ever for benign ground conditions. Improved Enhance Timing for more depth Improved electronics for increased target sensitivity and ground balance performance Six preset Search Modes gives you easy switch on and go detecting. In addition to General and Deep search are: Hi-Mineral, Patch, Hi-Trash and Pinpoint. All six Search Modes can be modified to your personal favorite settings. Menu accessible Search Modes can also be renamed. Increased Rx Gain adjustment allows you more precise sensitivity control for optimum performance. Automatic Ground balance options make it easy to adjust the detector to suit all ground conditions. e.g. (Fixed, Tracking, Tracking speed, Ground Balance Type, Quick-Trac button). Audio adjustments to maximize target signals for your personal hearing ability e.g. (Threshold, Tone, Audio Type, Signal Peak, Response, Target Volume, Volume limit, Stabilizer). Iron Reject adjustable to suit the iron trash level where you are detecting. Motion control, adjustable to match your sweep speed and optimize target responses. Tune (also known as Noise Cancel) - Automatic and Manual options to minimize electrical interference. Backlight so that you can read the LCD menu in any light, allowing you to detect day or night. The back light also has an adjustable timeout to help preserve battery power. Lightweight Li-ion Battery with inbuilt Speaker Booster capability Two coils as standard: 11” Double-D coil plus 11” Monoloop coil giving you added versatility and value. Languages: English, Spanish, Russian & Arabic (manual only)

When searching for gold you need the best. If you're looking for the very best gold detector - LOOK NO FURTHER, 5the GPX-5000 is it..



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Minelab Story
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, July 11, 2011 - 08:43 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

Since its origins in 1985 Minelab has been, and still is, the world leader in providing metal detecting technologies for consumer, humanitarian de-mining and military needs. Through devotion to research and development and innovative design, Minelab is today a major world manufacturer of hand held metal detector products. Over the past 20 years, Minelab has introduced more innovative and practical technology than any of its competitors and has taken the metal detecting industry to new levels of excellence.

Specializing in advanced electronic technologies, Minelab's competitive advantage was created early on with a highly innovative and dedicated research and development team inspired by the innovative physicist Bruce Candy. Minelab spends a higher percentage of annual revenue in research and development than any of its competitors enabling us to continue to provide cutting edge technology in metal detecting equipment. We excel in providing leading technologies and are confident that our culture of innovation and commitment to quality will ensure Minelab continues to succeed.

With manufacturing, distribution & customer service operations in Australia, Europe and the United States you are always safe in the knowledge that customer care is close at hand. Minelab’s worldwide network of Authorized Dealers are able to give you the most up-to-date knowledge in products and techniques that will help you to improve your success rate in the field. Minelab products continue to set new standards in the world of metal detecting for both performance and innovation.

In line with these high standards Minelab is an ISO 9001 Quality Endorsed Company. ISO 9001 is a worldwide quality standard certification that ensures continuous improvement is maintained in order to provide the highest level of product quality for our customers. We believe in a strong customer focus and working together to find innovative solutions that add value to our products.

It is this commitment to the development of new technologies, along with excellence in customer service that will give you a big advantage when you are out detecting, no matter what the ground or environmental conditions. With Minelab products you will have the opportunity to find more good targets more often.

In 2008 Minelab became a member of the dynamic Codan Group of Companies. The parent company, Codan Limited, is an international leader in high frequency radio and satellite communications markets with customers in over 150 countries. In 2009, Codan celebrates its commemorative year, marking 50 years of Codan communication equipment.



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A Minelab Success Story
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, July 11, 2011 - 08:43 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

I have been using the Minelab E-TRAC for almost 2 years now and can say without a doubt that it is the best machine for the type of metal detecting that I do. I primarily hunt cellar holes and abandoned home sites from the 1700's - early 1800's here in the NH/VT area. All of the sites are trashy and require the best equipment on the market.

The other day, after receiving permission from the land owner, I was able to get out and detect an old cellar hole that had been hit by many detectorists with lesser machines. After about 10 minutes at the site, I received a nice high tone accompanied by the numbers 09-41 near the edge of the old stone foundation. I decided to dig even though there were lots of ferrous and non ferrous bits of trash in the area.

I'm glad that I did! Up from about 9'' came this Gorgeous, fully intact US Military belt plate from the 1810-1820 era. WOW, was my response!!!!!!!! This is a beautiful piece of early American history and I feel as though it would still be in the ground had I been using a lesser machine.

I have made many incredible finds with my E-TRAC and I can't say enough praise about this machine and it's capabilities.

Thank you Minelab for offering us detectorists the best there is!
Jason Sevene-Swanzey - NH, USA



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The Minelab Excalibur- Part 1
Posted by: Webmaster on Tuesday, March 08, 2011 - 04:41 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

The Minelab Excalibur- Part 1

By Chris Valerio

Over the years I have often wondered which waterproof machine was the best all-around metal detector for shallow water treasure hunting? By best I mean the one that finds the most gold for me in the sea, in the shortest period of time. So why is that so important? Well just go on a Caribbean shallow water treasure hunting vacation, organized by George Streeter of Streeter Electronics and the answer becomes obvious and clear! While on such a treasure hunting vacation actual hunt time is very limited, as most vacations are fairly short in number of days. Perhaps 7 to 10 days? Furthermore it takes time to find and travel to the various island beaches that one will hunt. Then perhaps there is a vacation day where one is somewhat under the weather and not able to detect, possibly due to strong island rum? Or, your group runs into some sort of problem like the rental car breaking down, or the weather takes a turn for the worse. So while on a treasure hunting vacation one’s time to detect is unfortunately limited. Unlike someone who actually lives on the island. They can detect daily, when they choose to and often. The traveling treasure hunter simply does not have that equality. Plus you have to be better equipped and better skilled than any possible local treasure hunters on the island. When traveling for treasure those few days on the island is it and I want to make the most of my available time. For instance, that is why I will not use a pulse detector in the Caribbean. While pulse machines do go deep for treasure in the salt, because most lack any real discrimination, one simply has to dig too many junk targets. That can waste valuable vacation detecting time! As an example I once tested a popular PI detector in Guadeloupe by deciding to dig every metal target response I got. The theory was that if every target was dug, no gold would be missed. After a nearly 3 hours of testing I found 1 small gold chain and 175 pieces of junk! During that test I did not rest and dug like a madman to recover each and every target detected. Needless to say despite the gold chain it was a very unpleasant hunt. Not the kind of hunt to enjoy while vacationing! Interestingly as soon as I switched back to my Excalibur, I started finding gold regularly at the same beach!

Everyone has their favorite water detector and should use what they like best. I would never argue against that. Yet I do have opinions as to what machine works best in Caribbean saltwater for coins, gold, platinum and silver jewelry. For me there is only one machine and that is the Minelab Excalibur. As a matter of fact I would put the Excalibur up against any detector in saltwater anywhere! This is more than just mere opinion. It is based on personal experience. For one, I have partaken in many Caribbean treasure hunting vacations with George Streeter. Secondly I have tested an tried all types of other water machines on such vacations in search of a better mouse trap. There was only one way for me to find out which detector worked best, so I tried many! In the end I went right back to the Excalibur. In a nutshell, no other brand or type of detector can find as much gold jewelry as quick in the Caribbean! Especially when on limited vacation time. In such case the Excalibur will find the most gold and I’d be willing to put money on that! Believe me, if there were a better detector we would use it! I say we because these days everyone on Streeter’s trips use Minelab Excaliburs! I often refer to the Excalibur as a “Gold Magnet”. I recall on one Caribbean trip a retired Sheriff used a very expensive commercial style pulse detector, touted by some treasure divers and police forces worldwide. As a new on the trip, George told him to bring an Excalibur, but I guess that fell on deaf ears. For most days of the hunt the Sheriff found no gold with his trusty PI! I guess George felt sorry for him and loaned the Sheriff a back-up Excalibur to try. (Yes, we all bring 2 Excaliburs each as back-up machines) Using an Excalibur for the first time the Sheriff started to find gold jewelry in the sea! Guess what detector model the Sheriff owns these days?

So what makes the Excalibur so great? The simple answer to that is because they find gold! Heck, Excaliburs love gold and would eat gold for breakfast if possible! Breakfast of champions! But why? Well, lets start with the Excalibur is a complex machine and quite possibly the most technologically advanced water machine out there. Woe Nelly, just hold them horses a minute! Whatever happened to the K.I.S.S., or keep it simple stupid philosophy? Wouldn’t a more complex detector be more difficult too run, thus wasting valuable detecting time? I rest my case. Oh contraire my friends, in this case complex is simple! In plain English despite being complex the Excalibur is fairly simple to use! For the most part it is a set it and forget it machine, with some automation. That leaves more time for detecting because in order to find gold jewelry, one has to put the coil over it. The more time one spends detecting and looking for treasure, the better your chances of a strike! Taking this coil over it concept just one step further, the Excalibur is a rather coil forgiving machine. There are times when the Excalibur has the capability of detecting a target that is not directly under the coil! I have actually dug gold rings that were as far a 10 inches away from the coil side. And I mean not directly under the coil, but way off to the side of it! Yet my trusty Excalibur alerted me to the presence of a possible gold target by tone. Awareness of such signals comes in time with actual field use. Once learned the recognition of such tones, the treasure hunter simply sweeps in an expanding circle until the actual target location is discovered, then dug. No other detector I have ever tried can match that feat! I can not explain how the Excalibur does this. But it does so regularly!

The Excalibur has 2 modes, all-metal and discriminate. I always hunt in discriminate but set my discrimination level to 0. I do not want my machine to blank-out possible gold targets because discrimination is set too high. On the other hand I do use the discriminate mode so not many junk targets have to be dug. Even set at zero discrimination while in discriminate mode, the Excalibur still lets the user discriminate by audio tone. I rely on discrimination by ear to make all of my recovery decisions. Again with actual use and time one learns to recognize good tones, the ones to dig. Also the targets to pass on, avoiding much wasted digging time! Simply put I can now tell the difference between a pull tab and a gold ring by tone! Well, at least 80% of the time. When one gets a good gold tone, it’s almost like knowing for sure you have struck gold. Most of the time. Some aluminum pieces can and often do give a good sounding gold tone. But there are times when I’m so certain I have detected a gold ring, I would put money on it, prior to its recovery! The Excalibur is that good and no other machine can do that. With an Excalibur on can learn to differentiate between gold, silver and platinum jewelry, strictly by tone! Perhaps not 100%, but close. I can even now tell the difference between 1 and 2 Euro coins when hunting the French Caribbean island of Guadeloupe! Again, no other detector can do that! One Excalibur user once joked that she could tell the mintage year of coins by tones alone! Sure for a beginner the tones will mean little and sound confusing at first, but just like learning a new language, in time with practice one becomes better. Plus the learning nevers stops. To this day I still learn something new about my Excalibur on every treasure hunting trip! Eventually an Excalibur becomes a real threat to lost gold hiding in the sea! With an Excalibur one can literally pick-out or cherry-pick just the gold and platinum targets! Often and depending on my mood I actually leave the coins, most pull tabs and silver targets behind when using my Excalibur, because I would rather dig more gold and platinum range targets that day! Then at other times if targets are few and far between, I may choose to dig the coins and silver, or everything. No other machine can match that kind of versatility!

One thing that makes this possible is what Minelab calls Iron Mask. While in discriminate mode Iron Mask is activated, and the detector threshold will automatically null-out, or in other word go temporarily silent over iron. That’s how you know your coil has passed over a piece of worthless iron when searching for real treasure. But more than just recognizing buried iron in the sand, Iron Mask also has the ability to detect a piece of gold or silver lying right next to or directly on top of iron! This is outright amazing and can easily be demonstrated by placing a gold ring right on top of a piece of iron bar and with a few passes of the Excalibur coil, the machine will report only the gold ring and related tone! The iron will remain invisible. No other discriminating detector that I know of can do that. Other detectors simply discriminate the iron out, totally missing the gold ring in the process. Plus Iron Mask helps to detect a bit better at black sand beaches. How does Iron Mask work? Heck if I know, but it does work! And no other water detector has iron Mask!

Another smart Excalibur feature that complements Iron Mask is use of what is referred to as double d or DD coils. The windings in DD coils are in the shape of 2 letter D’s back to back. That’s why the are called DD. Without getting technical, this causes the detection field of the Excalibur to be concentrated fully down the center of the coil, and travels straight into the ground. Kind of like a butter knife in butter. The thinner concentrated detection field slices into the earth like a knife. Because the field extends the entire length of the coil, more ground is covered at maximum depth, compared to the more common concentric coils used in other machines, which produce more of a V detection pattern into the ground. The pinpoint of the V bottom is the deepest detection point. But targets outside of the V pattern may be missed if the user does not systematically overlap coil sweeps. With an Excalibur DD coil targets can be found at max depth, the entire length of the coil. What this translates to is, with an Excalibur and with each sweep, one covers more ground for targets at depth with a DD coil. Kind of like the broad coverage of an automotive windshield wiper blade. Plus a DD coil sees less ground matrix, thus causing less interference from mineralization. This is one reason one does not have to ground balance an Excalibur. That’s right, with an Excalibur one never has to waste time ground balancing the detector! There are enough things to think about and remember while detecting the surf. Not having to ground balance your machine is a Blessing! Especially in the salt chuck!

Another reason Excaliburs do not need to be ground balanced is because of what Minelab calls BBS, or Broadband Sprectrum Technology. Simply put Excaliburs transmit 17 different vlf frequencies from low to high at the same time! Those varying frequencies allow the Excalibur to be both sensitive to shallow and deep, small and larger metal targets at the same time. Quite often in the process detecting targets other machines totally miss. As I understand it, BBS technology also takes a sort of snapshot of the ground matrix. Then it can quantify and ignore ground mineralization. So done an Excalibur ignores most ground mineralization and only detects and reports the metal targets in the ground. So ground balancing or ground tracking does not have to be done while using an Excalibur. With other detectors requiring ground balancing, if not done right and often, poor detection results can occur. Just try manually ground balancing a detector while in rough surf conditions! With an Excalibur there is no need for that! One less thing to worry about that allows for more enjoyable detecting time.


There is no other Detector that will quickly find as much treasure in Caribbean waters as an Excalibur. That is my opinion and is based on actual field results. With my Excaliburs I have found enough gold and platinum to pay for my machines and trips several times over. While there is much more to talk about, I’ll save that for part 2. Also, while there are no real big Excalibur secrets, settings or hush, hush adjustments, there are several important Excalibur use tips for better success. Again, I’ll address those in the part 2 article. But for now know you simply can not go wrong buying an Excalibur for shallow water treasure hunting. There may be a machine that detects tiny chains a bit better, or a machine that might go a bit deeper, but none can match the Excalibur for overall treasure hunting performance in the sea, none! And the best place to buy your Excalibur is from Streeter Electronics. Not only will George Streeter give you a great price and deal, but as a customer of his you will be eligible to partake in his Caribbean treasure hunting vacations. www.streeter.org  Until then, may all the gold be with you.



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The Minelab Excalibur- Part 1
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, December 23, 2010 - 04:21 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

The Minelab Excalibur- Part 1

By Chris Valerio

Over the years I have often wondered which waterproof machine was the best all-around metal detector for shallow water treasure hunting? By best I mean the one that finds the most gold for me in the sea, in the shortest period of time. So why is that so important? Well just go on a Caribbean shallow water treasure hunting vacation, organized by George Streeter of Streeter Electronics and the answer becomes obvious and clear! While on such a treasure hunting vacation actual hunt time is very limited, as most vacations are fairly short in number of days. Perhaps 7 to 10 days? Furthermore it takes time to find and travel to the various island beaches that one will hunt. Then perhaps there is a vacation day where one is somewhat under the weather and not able to detect, possibly due to strong island rum? Or, your group runs into some sort of problem like the rental car breaking down, or the weather takes a turn for the worse. So while on a treasure hunting vacation one’s time to detect is unfortunately limited. Unlike someone who actually lives on the island. They can detect daily, when they choose to and often. The traveling treasure hunter simply does not have that equality. Plus you have to be better equipped and better skilled than any possible local treasure hunters on the island. When traveling for treasure those few days on the island is it and I want to make the most of my available time. For instance, that is why I will not use a pulse detector in the Caribbean. While pulse machines do go deep for treasure in the salt, because most lack any real discrimination, one simply has to dig too many junk targets. That can waste valuable vacation detecting time! As an example I once tested a popular PI detector in Guadeloupe by deciding to dig every metal target response I got. The theory was that if every target was dug, no gold would be missed. After a nearly 3 hours of testing I found 1 small gold chain and 175 pieces of junk! During that test I did not rest and dug like a madman to recover each and every target detected. Needless to say despite the gold chain it was a very unpleasant hunt. Not the kind of hunt to enjoy while vacationing! Interestingly as soon as I switched back to my Excalibur, I started finding gold regularly at the same beach!

Everyone has their favorite water detector and should use what they like best. I would never argue against that. Yet I do have opinions as to what machine works best in Caribbean saltwater for coins, gold, platinum and silver jewelry. For me there is only one machine and that is the Minelab Excalibur. As a matter of fact I would put the Excalibur up against any detector in saltwater anywhere! This is more than just mere opinion. It is based on personal experience. For one, I have partaken in many Caribbean treasure hunting vacations with George Streeter. Secondly I have tested an tried all types of other water machines on such vacations in search of a better mouse trap. There was only one way for me to find out which detector worked best, so I tried many! In the end I went right back to the Excalibur. In a nutshell, no other brand or type of detector can find as much gold jewelry as quick in the Caribbean! Especially when on limited vacation time. In such case the Excalibur will find the most gold and I’d be willing to put money on that! Believe me, if there were a better detector we would use it! I say we because these days everyone on Streeter’s trips use Minelab Excaliburs! I often refer to the Excalibur as a “Gold Magnet”. I recall on one Caribbean trip a retired Sheriff used a very expensive commercial style pulse detector, touted by some treasure divers and police forces worldwide. As a new on the trip, George told him to bring an Excalibur, but I guess that fell on deaf ears. For most days of the hunt the Sheriff found no gold with his trusty PI! I guess George felt sorry for him and loaned the Sheriff a back-up Excalibur to try. (Yes, we all bring 2 Excaliburs each as back-up machines) Using an Excalibur for the first time the Sheriff started to find gold jewelry in the sea! Guess what detector model the Sheriff owns these days?

So what makes the Excalibur so great? The simple answer to that is because they find gold! Heck, Excaliburs love gold and would eat gold for breakfast if possible! Breakfast of champions! But why? Well, lets start with the Excalibur is a complex machine and quite possibly the most technologically advanced water machine out there. Woe Nelly, just hold them horses a minute! Whatever happened to the K.I.S.S., or keep it simple stupid philosophy? Wouldn’t a more complex detector be more difficult too run, thus wasting valuable detecting time? I rest my case. Oh contraire my friends, in this case complex is simple! In plain English despite being complex the Excalibur is fairly simple to use! For the most part it is a set it and forget it machine, with some automation. That leaves more time for detecting because in order to find gold jewelry, one has to put the coil over it. The more time one spends detecting and looking for treasure, the better your chances of a strike! Taking this coil over it concept just one step further, the Excalibur is a rather coil forgiving machine. There are times when the Excalibur has the capability of detecting a target that is not directly under the coil! I have actually dug gold rings that were as far a 10 inches away from the coil side. And I mean not directly under the coil, but way off to the side of it! Yet my trusty Excalibur alerted me to the presence of a possible gold target by tone. Awareness of such signals comes in time with actual field use. Once learned the recognition of such tones, the treasure hunter simply sweeps in an expanding circle until the actual target location is discovered, then dug. No other detector I have ever tried can match that feat! I can not explain how the Excalibur does this. But it does so regularly!

The Excalibur has 2 modes, all-metal and discriminate. I always hunt in discriminate but set my discrimination level to 0. I do not want my machine to blank-out possible gold targets because discrimination is set too high. On the other hand I do use the discriminate mode so not many junk targets have to be dug. Even set at zero discrimination while in discriminate mode, the Excalibur still lets the user discriminate by audio tone. I rely on discrimination by ear to make all of my recovery decisions. Again with actual use and time one learns to recognize good tones, the ones to dig. Also the targets to pass on, avoiding much wasted digging time! Simply put I can now tell the difference between a pull tab and a gold ring by tone! Well, at least 80% of the time. When one gets a good gold tone, it’s almost like knowing for sure you have struck gold. Most of the time. Some aluminum pieces can and often do give a good sounding gold tone. But there are times when I’m so certain I have detected a gold ring, I would put money on it, prior to its recovery! The Excalibur is that good and no other machine can do that. With an Excalibur on can learn to differentiate between gold, silver and platinum jewelry, strictly by tone! Perhaps not 100%, but close. I can even now tell the difference between 1 and 2 Euro coins when hunting the French Caribbean island of Guadeloupe! Again, no other detector can do that! One Excalibur user once joked that she could tell the mintage year of coins by tones alone! Sure for a beginner the tones will mean little and sound confusing at first, but just like learning a new language, in time with practice one becomes better. Plus the learning nevers stops. To this day I still learn something new about my Excalibur on every treasure hunting trip! Eventually an Excalibur becomes a real threat to lost gold hiding in the sea! With an Excalibur one can literally pick-out or cherry-pick just the gold and platinum targets! Often and depending on my mood I actually leave the coins, most pull tabs and silver targets behind when using my Excalibur, because I would rather dig more gold and platinum range targets that day! Then at other times if targets are few and far between, I may choose to dig the coins and silver, or everything. No other machine can match that kind of versatility!

One thing that makes this possible is what Minelab calls Iron Mask. While in discriminate mode Iron Mask is activated, and the detector threshold will automatically null-out, or in other word go temporarily silent over iron. That’s how you know your coil has passed over a piece of worthless iron when searching for real treasure. But more than just recognizing buried iron in the sand, Iron Mask also has the ability to detect a piece of gold or silver lying right next to or directly on top of iron! This is outright amazing and can easily be demonstrated by placing a gold ring right on top of a piece of iron bar and with a few passes of the Excalibur coil, the machine will report only the gold ring and related tone! The iron will remain invisible. No other discriminating detector that I know of can do that. Other detectors simply discriminate the iron out, totally missing the gold ring in the process. Plus Iron Mask helps to detect a bit better at black sand beaches. How does Iron Mask work? Heck if I know, but it does work! And no other water detector has iron Mask!

Another smart Excalibur feature that complements Iron Mask is use of what is referred to as double d or DD coils. The windings in DD coils are in the shape of 2 letter D’s back to back. That’s why the are called DD. Without getting technical, this causes the detection field of the Excalibur to be concentrated fully down the center of the coil, and travels straight into the ground. Kind of like a butter knife in butter. The thinner concentrated detection field slices into the earth like a knife. Because the field extends the entire length of the coil, more ground is covered at maximum depth, compared to the more common concentric coils used in other machines, which produce more of a V detection pattern into the ground. The pinpoint of the V bottom is the deepest detection point. But targets outside of the V pattern may be missed if the user does not systematically overlap coil sweeps. With an Excalibur DD coil targets can be found at max depth, the entire length of the coil. What this translates to is, with an Excalibur and with each sweep, one covers more ground for targets at depth with a DD coil. Kind of like the broad coverage of an automotive windshield wiper blade. Plus a DD coil sees less ground matrix, thus causing less interference from mineralization. This is one reason one does not have to ground balance an Excalibur. That’s right, with an Excalibur one never has to waste time ground balancing the detector! There are enough things to think about and remember while detecting the surf. Not having to ground balance your machine is a Blessing! Especially in the salt chuck!

Another reason Excaliburs do not need to be ground balanced is because of what Minelab calls BBS, or Broadband Sprectrum Technology. Simply put Excaliburs transmit 17 different vlf frequencies from low to high at the same time! Those varying frequencies allow the Excalibur to be both sensitive to shallow and deep, small and larger metal targets at the same time. Quite often in the process detecting targets other machines totally miss. As I understand it, BBS technology also takes a sort of snapshot of the ground matrix. Then it can quantify and ignore ground mineralization. So done an Excalibur ignores most ground mineralization and only detects and reports the metal targets in the ground. So ground balancing or ground tracking does not have to be done while using an Excalibur. With other detectors requiring ground balancing, if not done right and often, poor detection results can occur. Just try manually ground balancing a detector while in rough surf conditions! With an Excalibur there is no need for that! One less thing to worry about that allows for more enjoyable detecting time.


There is no other Detector that will quickly find as much treasure in Caribbean waters as an Excalibur. That is my opinion and is based on actual field results. With my Excaliburs I have found enough gold and platinum to pay for my machines and trips several times over. While there is much more to talk about, I’ll save that for part 2. Also, while there are no real big Excalibur secrets, settings or hush, hush adjustments, there are several important Excalibur use tips for better success. Again, I’ll address those in the part 2 article. But for now know you simply can not go wrong buying an Excalibur for shallow water treasure hunting. There may be a machine that detects tiny chains a bit better, or a machine that might go a bit deeper, but none can match the Excalibur for overall treasure hunting performance in the sea, none! And the best place to buy your Excalibur is from Streeter Electronics. Not only will George Streeter give you a great price and deal, but as a customer of his you will be eligible to partake in his Caribbean treasure hunting vacations. www.streeter.org Additionally with Christmas right around the corner, perhaps a new Minelab Excalibur should be on Santa’s list? Until then, may all the gold be with you. Cabochris@msn.com



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From a 90 yr old
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, December 23, 2010 - 04:20 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

From a 90 yr old

1. Life isn't fair, but it's still good.

2. When in doubt, just take the next small step.

3. Life is too short to waste time hating anyone.

4. Your job won't take care of you when you are sick. Your friends and parents will. Stay in touch.

5. Pay off your credit cards every month.

6. You don't have to win every argument. Agree to disagree.

7. Cry with someone. It's more healing than crying alone.

8. It's OK to get angry with God. He can take it.

9. Save for retirement starting with your first paycheck.

10. When it comes to chocolate, resistance is futile.

11. Make peace with your past so it won't screw up the present.

12. It's OK to let your children see you cry.

13. Don't compare your life to others. You have no idea what their journey is all about.

14. If a relationship has to be a secret, you shouldn't be in it.

15. Everything can change in the blink of an eye. But don't worry; God never blinks.

16.. Take a deep breath. It calms the mind.

17. Get rid of anything that isn't useful, beautiful or joyful.

18. Whatever doesn't kill you really does make you stronger.

19. It's never too late to have a happy childhood. But the second one is up to you and no one else.

20. When it comes to going after what you love in life, don't take no for an answer.

21. Burn the candles, use the nice sheets, wear the fancy lingerie. Don't save it for a special occasion. Today is special.

22. Over prepare, then go with the flow.

23. Be eccentric now. Don't wait for old age to wear purple.

24. The most important sex organ is the brain.

25. No one is in charge of your happiness but you.

26. Frame every so-called disaster with these words 'In five years, will this matter?'

27. Always choose life.

28. Forgive everyone everything.

29. What other people think of you is none of your business.

30. Time heals almost everything. Give time time.

31. However good or bad a situation is, it will change.

32. Don't take yourself so seriously. No one else does.

33. Believe in miracles.

34. God loves you because of who God is, not because of anything you did or didn't do.

35. Don't audit life. Show up and make the most of it now.

36. Growing old beats the alternative -- dying young.

37. Your children get only one childhood.

38. All that truly matters in the end is that you loved.

39. Get outside every day. Miracles are waiting everywhere.

40. If we all threw our problems in a pile and saw everyone else's, we'd grab ours back.

41. Envy is a waste of time. You already have all you need.

42. The best is yet to come...

43. No matter how you feel, get up, dress up and show up.

44. Yield.

45. Life isn't tied with a bow, but it's still a gift.



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Hotel Security Tips
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, December 23, 2010 - 04:20 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Hotel Security Tips

Nov 01, 2010

More than one billion travelers stay at U.S. hotels every year. While most enjoy pleasant vacations and business trips, some fall victim to theft, burglary and even assault, crimes that several hotel security veterans say may rise during a recession as hotels cut employee hours and possibly security staff.

Jack Feingold, a vice president with ADT Security Services, urged vacationers to pay careful attention to their safety and security to avoid becoming a victim of criminals or injured in an emergency.

"When traveling, people tend to be more attractive to thieves looking for easy targets and hotel security is usually the last thing on travelers' minds as they check in to a hotel. But security and safety should be a concern for anyone staying in a hotel this summer," Feingold said.

To reduce the risk of crime or injury during a hotel stay, travelers should follow these safety tips:

Avoid rooms with ground- or second-level windows. When possible, choose a room between the third and sixth floors. Rooms on these floors are high enough to discourage access from the street, yet are within reach of most fire-department ladders.

Remember to always close and lock your door. Make it a habit to use all locks, including the deadbolt and chain. If you choose to stay in a room that faces pools or beach areas, make sure your sliding doors and windows have sturdy locks.

Do not open your door to anyone who knocks unexpectedly. If someone unexpectedly knocks claiming to be a hotel staff member, call the front desk to confirm his or her status before opening the door. And teach children to never open the door without your permission.

Park in well-lit areas and as close to the hotel as possible. Many hotel thefts take place in parking lots and structures, so finding a well-lit area to park your car is essential. Women traveling alone should ask for an escort to their cars at night. If possible, use valet parking services. Valet service allows you to leave and pickup your car at the main entry, while also providing an added layer of security for your vehicle.

Take note of the hotel's emergency evacuation plan. As soon as you enter your room, take time to look at the hotel's emergency escape plan and make a mental note of the nearest emergency exit and how to get there.

Choose a hotel with security cameras. Video surveillance cameras can provide an added layer of security to help prevent theft and discourage criminals. Hotel cameras should be placed in stairwells, pathways, exercise rooms, parking lots and any other public areas. Cameras not only help hotel staff track the safety of their visitors, they are also helpful in identifying criminals if a crime does occur.

"The most important thing to keep in mind when on vacation is safety, for you and your family,” Feingold said. “Taking a few minutes to think about hotel security is not only crucial to a fun, relaxing vacation; it is one of the best safety choices travelers can make."



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Treasure Hunter's Recipes
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, December 23, 2010 - 04:20 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Treasure Hunter's Recipes

Bringing Apple Pie To Sophisticated New Heights

(NAPSI)-What’s more American than apple pie? It’s certainly one of the most prized culinary traditions in the U.S. Now you can turn the well-loved dessert on its head and surprise your friends and family with this apple recipe that brings a European flair to a favorite American dessert.

The recipe features Lotus Bakeries’ Biscoff cookies, known as “Europe’s favorite cookie with coffee.” Created with all-natural ingredients and low in calories, the cookies provide a great way to reimagine America’s beloved apple pie.

Biscoff Upside-Down

Apple Torte

(Serves 6 to 8)

8 Biscoff cookies (approximately ¾ cup)

½ cup (1 stick) butter

3 small or 2 large apples, such as Jonagold, Gala or Fuji (about 1 pound)

2 large eggs

1 cup sugar, divided

¾ cup self-rising flour (If self-rising flour is unavailable, use all-purpose flour plus 1 teaspoon baking powder and ¼ teaspoon salt.)

Vanilla ice cream (optional)

Heat oven to 350° F. Lightly grease an 8- or 9-inch nonstick round cake pan or coat lightly with cooking spray; set aside. Finely crush cookies; set aside. Melt butter; set aside to cool. Peel and core apples; cut into thin slices and set aside. Beat together eggs and ½ cup of the sugar in a medium bowl with a wooden spoon. Stir in butter. Stir in flour and crushed cookies; mix well and set aside. Cook remaining ½ cup sugar in a small skillet over medium heat until completely melted and golden brown, about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Immediately pour into prepared pan, tilting pan to evenly spread caramel. Arrange apples in concentric circles over hot caramel. Spread cookie mixture evenly over apples. Bake 40 minutes or until golden brown and center is set. Cool in pan on wire rack 5 minutes. Use a knife to loosen cake from edge of pan; invert onto a serving plate. Serve warm or at room temperature with ice cream if desired.

Made in Belgium, the Biscoff tasty caramelized crisps zipped their way across the world more than 25 years ago when Delta Air Lines started serving them to its customers. High-flying passengers have enjoyed over 1.5 billion Biscoff cookies, which are also available at ground level in 8.8-oz. packages or individual .5-oz. two-packs at www.biscoff.com or through retailers nationwide.

Save Time With Slow Cooking

(NAPSI)-Making great comfort food doesn’t have to mean hours in the kitchen. In fact, a recent survey conducted by KRC Research for the National Pork Board found that three in four women say, when it comes to mealtime, it’s important to have recipes that can be prepared in 30 minutes or less.

Many pork cuts, including chops, brats and other dinner sausages, require minimal prep time, and make delicious dinners easy when busy schedules demand low-maintenance options.

You can also save time with the age-old low-and-slow cooking technique. It lets you spend less time in the kitchen and more time with the family. Plus, one of the best ways to cook pork is with the slow cooker! TheOtherWhiteMeat.com offers many slow-cooking recipes for you to try—from Perfect Pulled Pork Sandwiches to Sweet and Spicy Thai Pork Loin.

Check out these slow—cooking tips to make the most out of your next pork meal:

• Tomorrow’s Dinner Tonight—As the ultimate timesaving method, slow cooking lets you prepare tomorrow’s dinner the night before. Make it a family affair and enlist help with the prep work before setting your slow cooker to low and heading off to bed. When you wake up, dinner’s done. Transfer it to storage containers and refrigerate to reheat at dinnertime.

• Cut Down on Prep Time—The next time you’re browsing the meat aisle for the perfect cut of pork, stop by the counter and ask for your favorite protein to be cut into slow cooker-sized portions. This quick stop will cut down on prep time and ensure that your pork cooks evenly throughout.

• How Slow Can You Go?—Both high and low settings stabilize at the same temperature, so most dishes can be prepared using either cook speed. Typically, the simmer point (209° F) is reached within three or four hours on high and seven to eight hours on low, with larger cuts requiring the longer cook time.

Simple slow-cooking recipes with pork await you at www.TheOtherWhiteMeat.com and Facebook.com/TheOtherWhiteMeat, or follow on Twitter.com/AllAboutPork.

Special Snacks Stack Up Well Nutritionally

(NAPSI)-One of the most important meals you or your child eats during the day may not be a meal at all. It may be a snack.

Nutritious snacks such as peanuts can help meet daily nutrient needs. Protein-packed snacks can also help maintain energy levels while keeping hunger in check, thereby reducing overeating at mealtimes. But don’t just settle for the usual. When you and your kids are ready for a snack, there are some easy ways to turn the child- pleasing version into the “mommy special.” With one or two extra ingredients, you can make a nutritious kid snack into a more exotic adult snack. Such “double duty” snacks can become the basis for lunches and even dinners a few times a week. The approach caters to everyone’s taste and makes food prep and cleanup a breeze.

Here are a few you may enjoy:

Peanut Butter and Crackers

8 whole grain crackers

2 T creamy peanut butter

1 T mini dark chocolate chips

1 T dried cherries, diced

Start by spreading peanut butter on 6 crackers.

“The Usual”: Top two of the crackers with a second cracker.

“Mommy Special”: Top the other four crackers with a sprinkle of mini chocolate chips and a few dried cherries.

Cheese and Tomatoes

2 portions string cheese

8 cherry tomatoes

2 basil leaves, torn into 1” pieces

1 T balsamic vinaigrette

4 long toothpicks

Cut string cheese into 1” chunks.

“The Usual”: Alternate cheese with tomato on two toothpicks.

“Mommy Special”: Alternate cheese, tomato and basil pieces, drizzle with vinaigrette.

Peanut Mix

2 oz. peanuts

2 oz. raisins

1 oz. wasabi peas

Toss together peanuts and raisins. Divide in half.

“The Usual”: Peanuts and raisins.

“Mommy Special”: Add wasabi peas.

For more recipes and tips, visit www.nationalpeanutboard.org.

Hold The Butter. Olive Oil Is The Big New Thing In Baking

(NAPSI)-It may be the hottest thing in baking, and chances are you don’t even know about it.

With the USDA issuing new “Dietary Guidelines for Americans” that focus on battling obesity and related health problems, limiting saturated fats is on everyone’s mind. But what can replace butter and shortening in baked goods without sacrificing one iota of their sinfully good taste?

The answer: olive oil.

“Olive oil is a smart choice for increasing your intake of monounsaturated fat,” says Lisa A. Sheldon, MS, author of the “Olive Oil Baking” cookbook. “It also has 70 percent less saturated fat than butter.”

Understand: We’re not talking the kind of olive oil you pour on salads. Sheldon’s recipe below is made with Pompeian Extra Light Tasting Olive Oil, and the result is one very tasty, moist and lightly textured pound cake. Another plus, in general, of olive oil over butter in baking? Less is more: A recipe calling for 1 tablespoon (3 teaspoons) of butter, say, requires only 2¼ teaspoons of Pompeian.

Cranberry Walnut

Pound Cake

Serves 12-16

Ingredients:

1 cup all-purpose flour

1 cup whole wheat pastry flour (OR) 2 cups all-purpose flour

½ tsp. baking powder

¼ tsp. baking soda

1 tsp. salt

¼ tsp. cinnamon

4 large eggs

1⅓ cups granulated sugar

½ cup Pompeian Extra Light Tasting Olive Oil

1 tsp. vanilla extract

½ cup low-fat sour cream

½ cup finely chopped walnuts

1 cup fresh cranberries, finely chopped

Preparation:

Preheat the oven to 350° F. Generously coat a Bundt pan with oil.

In a small bowl, combine the flours, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon.

In a large bowl, beat the eggs with a handheld mixer until light and slightly increased in volume. Add the sugar slowly while continuing to beat. The mixture will become light and fluffy. Add the olive oil and vanilla extract and beat another 2 minutes.

Alternately add the dry ingredients and the sour cream to the batter, beating between additions. Gently fold in the chopped nuts and cranberries.

Transfer the batter to the prepared pan.

Bake at 350° F for 60-65 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean.

Cool in the pan on a wire rack for 10 minutes. Then invert the pan onto rack to remove and cool completely.

For more recipes, visit www.pompeian.com.

Tips For Making Easy, Delicious Meals

(NAPSI)-When it comes to making dinner, you are always looking for quick ideas to serve a great-tasting meal. With your busy schedule, cooking an exciting meal doesn’t need to involve a lot of preparation and planning. Putting a few twists on your meals by adding exciting flavors is easy, even on a busy weeknight.

• Add precut vegetables from the produce aisle to chicken or beef for a quick, delicious stir-fry. Cutting meat, poultry or vegetables into smaller or thinner pieces also cuts down on cooking time.

• One-dish dinners are real time-savers, plus cleanup is a snap. Try cooking beef, potatoes and carrots in the same roasting pan and enjoy the infused flavors.

• Replicate your family’s favorite restaurant meals at home by using packets of specially blended seasoning mixes, which allow you to create a complete meal quickly in one skillet or casserole dish.

Lawry’s has four new seasoning mixes that easily turn ordinary chicken, beef or pasta into a delicious meal the entire family will love.

• Asian Style Beef & Broccoli-This easy-to-prepare stir-fry meal will remind your family of its favorite Asian restaurant. The dish combines beef, broccoli and seasonings with a hint of garlic. Serve it over rice and you have a complete, satisfying meal.

• Chimichurri Burrito Casserole-Lawry’s gives the familiar burrito casserole a new twist with this traditional Latin American sauce. With a few simple fresh ingredients, mealtime just got a lot more exciting.

• Mediterranean Sundried Tomato & Garlic Chicken-Add a taste of the Mediterranean to your family’s casserole. This easy-to-bake casserole combines chicken, pasta, tomatoes and feta cheese to easily make an appetizing meal any night of the week.

• Tuscan Style Chicken Marsala with Garlic and Basil-Chicken Marsala is a restaurant favorite, but it might not make the menu at home. This effortless version comes together on your stovetop with just a few fresh ingredients. Flavorful garlic and basil give this meal its own Tuscan flair, perfect for serving over pasta or rice.

Lawry’s Seasoning Mixes are made with natural spices and contain 0 grams of trans fat per serving and no MSG.

Learn More

For more facts and tips, visit www.lawrys.com or you can call 1-800-9-LAWRYS.

Healthful Eating For People Who Love Food

by Tom Nikkola

(NAPSI)-It is possible to enjoy the holiday season without losing sight of your exercise and nutrition programs. By setting ground rules, you can enjoy holiday parties and celebrations without overdoing the food—or starving yourself. Consider these simple ideas:

1. Don’t succumb to peer pressure. If you’ll be around other people indulging in sweets, treats and other unhealthy delights, be prepared. If you do choose to partake in some less healthful options, do it because you decided to, not because someone else talked you into it.

2. Good prep leads to a well- balanced party. Completing a workout prior to a dinner party or other event can help you better metabolize the food you’re about to eat. While you likely won’t burn more calories than you consume, exercise increases insulin sensitivity and powerfully prepares your body to store more glycogen, meaning more of those carbohydrates will likely be stored in your muscle instead of being converted to fat.

3. Water, water and more water. Constantly sipping on water is a great way to stay “full.” A couple of glasses before a meal can be a great way to keep a lid on food intake. In fact, a recent American Chemical Society presentation said drinking two glasses of water prior to a meal can produce greater weight loss than consuming the meal alone.

4. Go for the veggies first. Besides being loaded with nutrients, the considerable fiber and water found in vegetables can help you avoid overeating. If you’re dining out, start with a salad. If you’re at a party, look for the vegetable tray.

5. Got protein? Keep it lean. Some fat in the diet is important. And the fat found in pasture-raised or grass-fed animal protein even has some health-promoting effects. Chances are, however, when you’re at a party or going out for dinner, the meat wasn’t raised that way. Look for a lean source of protein, such as grilled chicken, fish, turkey or lean cuts of beef.

6. Save the sweets and carbs for last. If you stay true to the ideas above, you’ll likely feel pretty satisfied. Sweet potatoes, regular potatoes and rice are good sources of carbohydrates and they’re gluten-free. If you still crave the occasional high-carbohydrate treat, be sure to consume a balanced meal of vegetables and protein first.

• Nikkola is nutrition program manager for Life Time Fitness.



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Underwater treasure hunting on the ban list?
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, December 23, 2010 - 04:13 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Underwater treasure hunting on the ban list?

If you like to dive for your treasure then you may want to start keeping a closer eye on the United Nations. The international pinheads have decided that they want to ban all underwater treasure hunting, well, commercial treasure hunting that is, in an effort to “protect underwater cultural heritage”.

According to the UN convention it will still be legal for the archives to do their thing but anyone wanting to actually hunt for a profit will be banned from doing so. They say they are trying to protect the underwater artifacts for future generations however if nobody is looking for them then they won’t be very protected as they sit on the bottom of the ocean and slowly dissolve away with time.

In my opinion the pinheads don’t care about cultural heritage. If they did then the different countries that have joined this convention would spend a lot more money each trying to locate and recover these “cultural” artifacts but they don’t. They just sit like vultures waiting for someone who has spent their own hard earned money and time to find them and then they swoop in and try to take it all away. Do I sound bitter?

I agree that some laws are needed to govern the unscrupulous treasure hunters but they always go overboard and I sure don’t think there should be some international law defining what each country can and cannot do.
Nova Scotia is the latest country to jump on board with the U.N. convention, banning all commercial underwater treasure hunting beginning 1 January 2011.

If I were a lawyer I think I would come up with a new interpretation of “commercial treasure hunting” and find away around this stupid law. Governments are notorious for not looking for these so called cultural artifacts and the majority of them are only found by pure accident or by professional treasure hunters. I think this will drastically decrease the amount of the “cultural heritage” found in the future.

As far as I can tell our own pinheads in D.C. have not joined this convention, not yet anyway, but you might keep your eyes open for any kind of legislation in the future. How long will it be before they decide that the ground we walk on contains “cultural heritage” and ban us from any type of treasure hunting? They have done this in some areas already but the pinheads are notoriously ignorant of real life so one of these days we may all be fighting to keep our hobby/profession from being killed off by these morons.



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New Goldmaster Headphone!
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, December 23, 2010 - 04:12 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

New Goldmaster Headphone!


In 2005 I started experimenting trying to build a better headphone for my Excal, and over the years it has evolved to the Goldmaster headphone!!

The New Goldmaster headphones will unleash your detectors full potential by allowing you to now hear and interpret fringe signal targets that would be otherwise missed using the stock phones.

The Goldmaster headphones are louder and clearer, with a much better low tone response + great noise reduction
All this adds to Lots of advantages over stock or any other available headphones out there.
It's like having an audio Amp installed since the threshold can now be set to a lower setting,
This allows the fringe signal targets to become more easily heard over the threshold.

The New Goldmaster headphones are built using a High performance piezoelectric speaker system and a premium sound protector.
This combination provides unsurpassed audio quality and extreme noise reduction, better then any other headphone available.

Hear what you've been missing!! and Find out for yourself why more and more hunters agree that Goldmaster headphones are simply the best!!
The New Goldmaster Headphones were designed by a professional water hunter and are hand made and assembled in the good Ole U.S.A.

They're ready to be plugged into an excal that has a battery end cap installed on the control tube.
The price for the headphones with male Ikelite waterproof connector is $229.....

If Your excal control tube is not set up for an Ikelite connector you can send in your headphone with endcap
to have a new pair of Goldmaster headphones installed on your existing endcap and cable.

Your New Goldmaster headphone will reward you with more valuable finds faster then ever before!!

Many Thanks & Successful Hunting!!
Mr. Goldmaster

BELOW are some recent comments sent in from Goldmaster headphones users.

+++OMG! Those headphones should be illegal! Put them on the blue tube 1000. Now I can hear everything!Can you make me a second set? I ask because now the factory phones on the other machine sound like garbage!
your headphones make an Excalibur a different machine! Minelab should get a clue! A $1,200 machine should have headphone to match!

+++A very impressive set of phones--you have restored my faith in the Excal
Very nice audio, quite clean on targets and good on small stuff.

+++I now understand what people mean when they say that your headphones make their metal detector become alive. I could not believe how much I had to turn down the volume on my Sovereign. While I did not make any great finds. I was able to find very small targets in an area that was heavy search before. I know that I have a better chance of finding a target now because the target will give a better clearer audio response with your headphones!

+++Just got the phones in--very impressive! A great middle range and perfectly matched for the Excal.
Have not heard that nice of an audio response from a machine since the Aqua. Very sharp and clean.

+++The Mr. Goldmaster custom headphones are the loudest headphones I have ever heard! But its their ability to amplify subtle tones that will turn your excalibur into the true sword pulled from the anvil!

+++When I jury rigged your Goldmaster phones to my PI Pro the audio came alive! Much better than stock, Gray Ghost phones and even yellow Excalibur phones. Your phones are wonderful on PI Pro I would just love to hardwire the phones you built for me to my PI Pro, but then I would not have any for Excalibur!

+++ the GM headphones are loud and awesome and I can hear double tones, ie- nickels and quarters together the most amazing part is that I haven't had a single whisper tone yet--even the deep targets are loud and clear--that's 3 gold in 4 hunts with the new phones!

+++I FINALLY got out last night and ran the new headphones. Sounds quality was great and they ARE louder than the previous Koss and old blues. The thing that is interesting, is the fact you can make a better determination about what a target is, because you are receiving better information on the clarity, imo

+++I took the Mr. Goldmaster Headphones out on their maiden voyage and I was quite pleased with their performance and comfort. Trash tones sound a little more definable, but the pure tones sounded just plain lovely. Minelab claims the excalibur has about 17 different tones and I was finally hearing all of them in High Def! When I came across my first nickel it sounded like the Excal was trying to serenade me. Your headphones are the closest thing a regular joe like me can come to owning a Ferrari!

+++I have been using both the Koss and yours lately and the Goldmaster headphones are clearly superior to the Koss
I have sent a few NON-LOCAL folks your way, but I don't want this to catch around here, LOL!

+++I used the DF yesterday with the Goldmaster headphones. Still fine tuning the internal volume adjustment to match the new headphones. But it is now so much easier to hear the double beep on hairpins. I generally know when I have a beer bottle cap. I am starting to realize when the target could be a coin. At the end of the hunt, I got a sound that I did not know and it was a cheap pendant. Then a few minutes later, I got another sound that I did not know what it was. It was a high school class ring. I am pretty sure that I now have a fresh drop high school class ring from 1919. It tested 10K , there is only three initials inside in the old script writing. No maker mark or karat markings. Weight 4.1 grams. Bottom line is that I can tell what some targets are with my brain dead hearing with these headphones!
I can not wait to get the two other headphones to try!

+++What a joy! They not only let me hear what was small and deep but
I never had to reposition them on my head the whole time I was in the water and being knocked around by the surf.
I also NEVER lost hearing the low level threshold ( just a very low hum ) even when I was right in a breaking wave!
Did I find a priceless diamond ring? NO just a little change and the normal junk but if that coil had passed over one
I surely would have been able to hear it that's for sure.
If anyone contacts you and wants to know if your headphones are really as good as you claim
tell them to get in contact with me and I will be glad to tell them the same as I am telling you here and now.
I will be in contact with a few people I know that may well be interested in having them installed on there EXCAL.s
Again thanks for your quick service and a great product.

 Phillip Silverstein,   dssussb@yahoo.com



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The Massachusetts Pine Tree Shilling
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, November 11, 2010 - 04:23 PM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

The Massachusetts Pine Tree Shilling

Prior to the formation of our union of colonies, there were a number of legal tender options available to the residents of New England.  In the early colonial era, coinage of any sort was rare.  The colonists used Spanish Reale’s, British, Dutch, and other coinage as currency; the transaction rates for those currencies were set by the various governors – against each other and their values and valued against commodities such as grains, animals, and even bullets.  Being that the coinage was scarce, barter was always the backup for hard currency.  Bartering as a sole method of transaction hindered growth and general commerce.  If there were only a few types of commodities available in a given area, no one really could transact business easily; it is hard to trade a bushel of barley to your neighbor for his cow, if he had plenty of barley himself. One’s barley, though valuable, could be worthless on a local level. A plentiful and available hard currency was important to the economic future of the colony.

Governor Winthrop and the Massachusetts General Court, against the wishes (or knowledge) of the British crown, established a colony-wide currency system based on the British system of shillings, and pence.  Denominations were noted as XII (One shilling or twelve pence), VI (One-half shilling or sixpence), and III (Quarter shilling or three pence). The colonial government set assay standards and commissioned John Hull as the mint master.  The first attempts were a simple planchet (coin blank) with NE on the one end of the obverse (front) and the denomination on the opposite end of the reverse. That simple and plain coinage was easily counterfeited or clipped, and soon changed to the more complicated tree shillings. What tree the die maker was attempting to portray was in question; the early versions were referred to as the Willow and subsequent as the Oak tree versions.  All Massachusetts coinage was stamped with the date 1652, even if it was minted in the final year some 30 years later in 1682. (Said to confuse the Brits)  The Oak Tree Shilling was also coined in two pence, the only example with a different date, 1662.  Authenticated, these versions are extremely rare.  If in your metal detecting excursion you dig a legitimate Willow, you will have enabled your own stimulus package and need not work again.

The Pine Tree version was created, it is said, to create a coin that was representative of a distinctive tree and that tree would better represent the Massachusetts Bay Colony; the Eastern White Pine was an important commodity in New England for ship masts and as regular lumber.  The King was none too pleased with the issuance of the Massachusetts coinage, yet he didn’t ever take any serious action against the colonies.  Perhaps it was better that there be Massachusetts coins than continue the use of Spanish and Dutch coinage.

Many different versions of the Pine Tree coinage exist, nine versions of the shilling and thirty-seven versions of all denominations are known to exist, including counterfeits.  These numbers are debatable among numismatists.  The earliest “NE” coins were hand struck; it is assumed that a screw press was procured in 1654 for the production of the more complicated “tree” versions. As demand increased, production make have changed from the screw press in the Willow and Oak versions to a rocker press for the actual Pine Tree version.  A rocker press would stamp and cut coins from a strip of sliver rather than an individual planchet.  The uniformity of coins from the same die was very inconsistent.  The planchet size would also vary greatly, both in width and thickness.  It is said that in order to prevent the dies from wearing out prematurely, the thickness of the planchet would be reduced as a thinner blank put less wear-and-tear on the dies. Those many inconsistencies enabled healthy counterfeiting.

Unfortunately, not many good records exist on the actual production methods and amounts.  Mr. Hull also ran a silversmith business on the same property as the mint.  Mr. Hull was paid in a method that gave his business a shilling for X number of shillings produced and from that he paid the commonwealth a fee for the use of the minting equipment. Instead of separate ledgers for the mint and silversmith businesses, Mr. Hull combined them into a single ledger.  Silver and coal would come in and rings, spoons, and shillings would come out of the front door as well as the same general ledger.  There have been quite a few PhD candidates that did their dissertation on Hull’s accounting practices.  John Hull was a well-to-do and propertied man at the time of his death in 1683.

The obverse of the Pine Tree Shilling, as with many of its predecessors, was stamped with MASACHVSETS IN on the outside edge of the obverse face.  The text, depending on the die, was separated with a dot, two dots, six dots in a circle with a center dot, and a version that also appears to be a flower or clover.  Inside a patterned circle was the pine tree; many versions with different styles and numbers of branches exist.  The reverse was stamped with NEW ENGLAND AN DOM around the perimeter of the face with the date 1652 and the denomination XII (twelve pence or one shilling) in the center. Text separation again was varied.

Though the Pine Tree Shilling, and its lesser denomination pence versions, was much more common than the earlier NE, Willow, or Oak coins, they are still extremely rare and valuable.  The coins were melted, lost, or ended up in other countries and continents.  Given all that, it is hard to place a value on the average Pine Tree Shilling.  Prices depend on many factors, condition and the rarity of the version.  What we detectorists hope for is that they are lost and appear under our coils someday.  Perhaps the further away from the center of the Bay colony, the less of a chance we have to dig one. Although any found coin brings a smile to my face, it is a dream that one should show up on my screen and sing “silver” in my ear.  Perchance I would be careful with my digging knife and it would come out of the ground in good shape.

I don’t profess to be a numismatist and have taken many liberties with what are my interpretations of the information available in various books and internet sources.  This article is not meant to be a thesis on the Pine Tree, just something to amuse me and perhaps you on this fine day.

“Sing a song of sixpence; a pocket full of rye.  Four and twenty blackbirds, baked in a pie.  When the pie was opened, they all began to sing.  Now wasn’t that a dainty dish to set before the King?”

Kurt Shilling



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Garrett Infinium Land & Sea Metal Detector
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, November 08, 2010 - 11:31 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Garrett Infinium Land & Sea Metal Detector

Excels underwater and underground

Nonmotion All-Metal Mode

Automatic Ground Track adjustable tracking speed

Audio Threshold Adjustment

The Infinium Land and Sea excels underwater and underground. It’s ideal for prospecting wrecks and hunting heavily mineralized environs. By using the Nonmotion All-Metal Mode, the unit can detect the smallest treasure. It can identify coins, nuggets and relics as deep as 200 feet in the ocean. Because the unit has an ultralow battery drain, it can operate on eight AA batteries, which makes it lighter than competitor’s models. Alkaline and rechargeable batteries are included. Automatic Ground Track’s adjustable tracking speed permits hunting in irregular soils. Interpretation of target signals is enhanced by the Audio Threshold Adjustment. Includes 10" x 14" Power DD submersible PROformance search coil, hip-mount and belt. Also includes land headphones, owner’s manual and instructional DVD. Two-year limited warranty. Made in USA.

Length: Adjustable from 28" to 52".
Buoyancy: Near neutral.
Weight: 5-1/2 lbs. stem-mounted, 3-4/5 lbs. hip-mounted.
Control housing weight: 31 oz.
Submersion depth: 200 ft.
Detection frequency: Adjustable, 730 pulses-per-second



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Introducing the Garrett ACE 350
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, November 08, 2010 - 11:31 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Introducing the Garrett ACE 350

Introducing the new Garrett Ace 350. It comes with powerful, large 8.5" x 11" PROformance Double-D searchcoil. DD configuration provides greater detection depth and performance by significantly reducing the negative effects of heavily mineralized ground and saltwater interference. The long, narrow detection field provides excellent scanning coverage and target separation ability, as compared to conventional coils. The blunted tip and tail design further extends the coil's total scan area and offers improved searching along obstacles and is optimized for maximum detection depth on small relics and coin-sized targets.

Key Features and Specifications
Garrett ACE 350

Features:
- Powerful, large 8.5"x11" PROformance DD search coil
- Enhanced Iron Resolution allows more control of iron discrimination levels; helps separate good target from adjacent junk iron.
- Higher Frequency - offers improved ability to detect small conductive targets (small coins, nuggets)
- Volume control headphones - Garrett Clear Sound Easy Stow headphones are included with ACE 350

- Electronic Pinpointing to speed target recovery
- Accept/Reject Discrimination to modify discrimination patterns

- Five Search Modes: select pre-set discrimination patterns or create your own
- Continuous Coin Depth Indicator to determine target depth
- Battery Condition Indicator shows battery life continually
- Interchangeable ACE series search coils are available
- Pushbutton Controls with One-Touch operations
Garrett ACE 350 Specifications:
Target ID Cursor Segments - 12
Iron Discrimination Segments - 4
Accept/Reject Discrimination - YES
Search Modes - 5
Sensitivity/Depth Adjustments - 8
Electronic Pinpointing - YES
Frequency - 8.25 kHz
Audio Tone ID Levels - 3
Standard Search coil - 8.5"x11" DD PROformance
Length (Adjustable) - 42" to 51" (1.06m-1.29m)
Total Weight - 2.8Ibs. (1.27 kgs.)
Batteries - 4 AA (included)
Warranty - 2 Year, Limited Parts/Labor
Optimized for maximum detection depth on small relics and coin-sized targets

Ace 350 DD coil configuration provides greater detection depth & performance by significantly reducing the negative effects of heavily mineralized ground and saltwater interference.

Long, narrow detection field provides excellent scanning coverage and target separation ability, as compared to conventional coils.
Garrett exclusive: blunted tip and tail design further extended coil's total scan area and offers improved searching along obstacles (walls, fencing, etc).

The Ace 350 is $350 @ Streeters in Marlborough, NH 603/876-4443



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Garrett Electronics AT PRO for $699
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, November 08, 2010 - 11:31 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Garrett Electronics AT PRO for $699

The new Garrett At Pro metal detector is perfect for land and water detecting. Experience extreme depth and performance in all terrains. The AT Pro is one detector that is designed to meet all of your treasure hunting needs

The new Garrett At Pro metal detector is designed for treasure hunting both on land and in the water. Now you can experience extreme depth and performance in a professional metal detector. Designed from the ground up to be used in all terrains. The AT Pro is one detector that is engineered to meet all of your treasure hunting needs. The Garret AT Pro creates a new International standard for All Terrain Metal Detectors around the world.

Garrett AT Pro Premium Features:

Standard and professional audio modes - Standard Mode provides conventional target response for easy operations. Experienced users can select Pro Mode to obtain more advance audible Target ID to judge target size, shape, and depth.

Fast Recovery speed - Pro Mode Audio offers greater ability to pick out good targets amongst trash and fast recovery speed on multiple targets.

Pro Mode Audio™ - Proportional Audio and Tone Roll Audio™ features allow the user to hear characteristics of a target as in a True All-Metal Mode.

High-resolution iron discrimination - Use touchpads to set iron discrimination in one of 40 levels for the precise ability to separate good targets from trash.

Iron Audio™: Advanced iron identification - Allows user to hear discriminated iron (normally silenced) and to alter the detector's mid-tone signal's range in order to avoid digging undesired ferrous targets.

All terrain versatility - Waterproof housing and connectors protect against dusty muddy, wet and humid environments. The AT Pro can be immersed in water to a 10-foot depth (maximum) to search in and along shorelines, rivers, piers, docks or swimming holes.

Digital Target ID - The 0 to 99 Target ID scale offers increased ability to distinguish one target's conductivity from another.

Manual Ground balance - Allows user to manually adjust the detector's ground balance to reduce the detrimental effects of ground mineralization.

Fast Track™ Ground Balance - Automatic feature that allows user to quickly ground balance the detector in mineralized soil conditions.

Electronic Pinpointing - This All-Metal Mode function is used to precisely locate a detected target's location in the ground.

15 kHz High Frequency - Offers improved detection of small targets, gold nuggets and jewelry.

Exclusive Garrett DD coil design for mineralized soil and superior target separation.

Land headphones are included standard. An optional waterproof headphone is available.

All Terrain Features Of The Garrett AT Pro Metal Detector:

Relic Hunting

Coin Shooting

Prospecting

Cache Hunting

Jewelry Hunting

Shallow Water Searching

Beach Hunting

Competition Events

Mineralized Soil Areas

Advanced Target Separation

Fast Recovery Speed

Professional Audio Mode for Additional Target Info

Treasure Hunt in All Terrains

The Garrett AT Pro is designed using a waterproof control housing and waterproof connections. These features protect the detector in dust, murky, wet and moist environments. The AT Pro can be submerged in water to a depth of 10 feet. Use it to treasure hunt along the shore, in ponds, streams and swimming spots. Head back to those old forgotten swimming holes and recover lost valuables missed by other detectorists. Now you can experience one detector that is equally good on land or in the water. Take your treasure hunting to a new extreme.

IRON AUDIO

An area littered with iron objects in the ground can cover up good targets and even create phantom signals that at first glance appear to be good target signals. The AT Pro includes a selectable Iron Audio feature allows the user to hear discriminated iron. This allows you to have the most information and avoid being tricked into digging an undesired target.

In addition the Iron Audio also allows you to adjust the mid-tone's range to include all targets higher than the point of discrimination. You can effectively adjusting the cut off point between the Low audio tone discriminated trash targets and the Mid tone audio targets. This feature of the AT Pro metal detector works in both the Garrett Standard and the Pro audio Modes.

Digital Target ID (0 to 99 scale)

For the first time Garrett has included a target ID scale. The Garrett AT Pro includes a Digital Target Identification system to give you the specific target value. This will help you identify buried targets with great precision and ease. All targets are shown on the LCD display by number. Targets that are closest to 1 are the most ferrous (iron). As you go up the scale, the most conductive items come up with numbers closer to 99.



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Minelab Explorer SE & SE Pro differences?
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, November 08, 2010 - 11:31 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Minelab Explorer SE & SE Pro differences?

Each upgrade from the XS to the SE Pro has been what I call baby steps. Each time it's just a little faster possessor, Different coil and a little better ergonomics.

The difference between the SE and SE Pro is just that, a little faster processor, easier menu and a little better ergonomics. Now the E-Trac is the big step that could have been made long ago. They finally bent the grip enough to make the machine much easier to handle (great ergonomics) Much easier menu, Faster processor and rerouting all coins to one ferrous line of 12. It's like any other product or company. They have the technology to make the jump all in one new machine but by doing just a little at a time, they get to sell more machines. It's not just Minelab but all companies. A way of making money. Basically, the Explorer II with a Pro coil is an SE Pro with a slower processor.

NH Bob.



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Fisher Labs 1280-X Aquanaut
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, November 08, 2010 - 11:31 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Fisher Labs 1280-X Aquanaut

Water hunters look to a number of features when picking out a detector- Depth, ground balancing, ease of use, discrimination and durability. Fisher Labs has been producing detectors since the 30’s. Although we are often focused on Minelab and White’s lines, Fisher is quietly producing a solid line of detectors that many detectorists are devoted to.

The 1280X, as with all Fisher detectors, is excellent in regards to depth. In a non-scientific wet sand test at the edge of a fresh water source, a clad quarter was easily detected at 8”. The one area that Fisher detectors have always excelled in is their capability for deep detection; it seems the 1280X is as strong as their land detectors in that area. When a water detectorist is in or under water, the last thing they need to be concerned with is tweaking knobs to compensate for changing ground conditions. The 1280X circuitry is designed to easily adapt to most ground conditions in both salt and fresh water applications.

Ease of use is very important to the water detectorist, especially the deep water divers. The 1280X is equipped with three simple analog knobs on the face, volume, sensitivity, and discrimination. The knobs are of adequate size and design so that you could use bulky diving gloves or bare hands. My only negative comment in this area is Fisher’s color selections for the control panel. Although adequate, no one beats the Minelab easy to see, if gaudy, color palette on the Excalibur underwater detectors. When in murky or dark conditions we want highly visible colors to change settings, and God forbid, see the detector if we were to lose our grasp on the detector. The 1280X, like many underwater detectors, floats –it is equipped with a belt clip for attaching the detector when digging a signal in deep water. The discrimination controls on the 1280X use a simple analog dial knob from 0-10. A long time 1280 user, Dave G. guided me to have the discrimination setting at around 2 during the search process and then to 4 or so when determining the target. The 1280X uses an audio communications mode to let you know what type target you might be over. At the 2 setting, all metal gives a tone that its quality is based on the duration of the tone. A shorter duration tone, at every discrimination setting, “usually” suggests a lesser quality target. Conversely a longer tone signifies a better target. When increasing the discrimination level, the signal gets shorter and “clippier” on trash type targets. If you were to look at the 1280X signal on an oscilloscope you would see solid signals with a nice flat top line and lesser targets as a pointier shape. As you know, the signal profiles of gold and pull tabs, as well as silver and screw caps are similar. Better to “dig ‘em all” rather than lose that small gold ring because you happen to be tired of pull-tabs. The 1280X uses an 8 inch
concentric coil and piezoelectric headphones. The 1280X is rated to 250 feet below sea level.

As far as durability, Fisher always builds a solid machine with high quality components and materials. The machine that I tested was a used one and it has held up very well. The control knobs were nice and tight and the high quality plastics and metals make it a fine
machine.

John Quist john.a.quist@gmail.com



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Recipes to Try
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, November 08, 2010 - 11:30 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Recipes to Try

Some Crazy Vanillas

When selecting vanilla beans, choose plump beans with a thin skin to get the most seeds possible. To test, gently squeeze the bean between your fingers.
Pods should be dark brown, almost black in color, and pliable enough to wrap around your finger without breaking. If the beans harden, you can soften them by dropping into the liquid of your recipe until softened. Cutting into a hard bean can cause the knife to slip and result in potential injury.
Old-Fashioned Vanilla Bean Ice Cream

If you've never made vanilla ice cream, you'll be stunned at how much better it tastes than the somewhat gelatinous options available at the store (high-end ice creams excluded). Automatic ice cream makers are fairly inexpensive, and if you make your own frozen desserts often enough, it will pay for itself in a short period of time. After trying this vanilla version, we predict you'll be happily making sorbets and frozen custards in no time and like a pro

ingredients

2-1/2 cups half-and-half, light cream, or whole milk
3/4 cup sugar
1 4- to 6-inch vanilla bean or 1 tablespoon vanilla extract*
1-1/4 cups whipping cream

directions

In a large saucepan heat and stir half-and-half, sugar, and vanilla bean (if using) just to a simmer. Remove from heat. Remove vanilla bean; let cool. Using a paring knife, slit vanilla bean lengthwise. Scrape out seeds. Stir seeds (or vanilla extract, if using) and whipping cream into milk mixture. Cover; chill about 4 hours.

Freeze mixture in ice-cream freezer according to manufacturer's directions. Ripen 4 hours. Makes 1-1/2 quarts (twelve, 1/2-cup servings).

*Note: Omit heating the mixture if using vanilla extract.

Very Vanilla Layer Cake

ingredients

3/4 cup butter, softened

1 2/3 cups sugar

2 large eggs

2 1/2 tsp. Cook's Pure Vanilla Powder

3 cups sifted flour

2 1/2 tsp. baking powder

1 tsp. salt

1 1/4 cup milk

Directions

Grease and flour three 8-inch cake pans, preheat oven to 350ºF

Blend butter, sugar, and eggs, beat for 5 minutes at high speed

Sift Cook's Pure Vanilla Powder, flour, baking powder, and salt together

Add dry ingredients alternately with milk, starting and ending with dry ingredients, beating between each addition

After last addition, beat on low speed just until smooth

Divide batter evenly between three prepared pans and bake for 30-35 minutes

Cake should spring back when touched lightly, allow to cool in pans on wire rack for 10 minutes

Remove cake from pans

To assemble cake, place one layer on plate, top side up: Spread with half of vanilla crème (recipe below)

Place next layer on filling, top side down: spread with remaining filling

Position final later top side up: if layers seem to slide, refrigerate briefly to set filling

Apply a thin layer of vanilla butter frosting (recipe below) to sides of cake

Frost a second time with a slightly thicker layer, swirling frosting

Frost top of cake last, creating decorative swirls

Vanilla Crème:

1 1/2 cups milk

1 Cook's Gourmet Madagascar Vanilla Bean

1/2 cup sugar

4 egg yolks

1/4 cup flour

Scald milk with Cook's Gourmet Madagascar Vanilla Bean. In a saucepan, beat 1/2 cup sugar and 4 egg yolks until creamy and light. Add 1/4 cup flour, mixing just to blend. Add the scalded milk gradually, stirring until well combined.
Cook over low heat, stirring with a whisk until cream comes to the boiling point. Remove from heat; remove the vanilla bean. Allow to cool, stirring occasionally. Refrigerate until ready to use

Vanilla Butter Frosting:

3/4 cup butter, softened

1 egg

6 cups sifted powdered sugar

2 tsp. Cook's Pure Vanilla Powder

3 Tbsp. heavy cream

Blend butter and egg. Gradually beat in powdered sugar and Cook's Pure Vanilla Powder. Add cream, stirring until thoroughly combined

Vanilla frosting is very versatile and goes well with all types of baked goodies, be it a regular cake, cupcake or cookie. And vanilla frosting recipe is so simple and easy that you can prepare it within no time. As per your taste buds and diet restrictions, gather the required supplies such as vanilla extract (or bean, if desired for a rich flavor), milk, butter and sugar in specific quantities. Then blend them together in an electric mixer till you get the required smoothness. Here are some of the vanilla frosting recipes, which you can make and use to top your favorite baked foods. You can read more on cake recipes.

Vanilla Frosting Recipe from Scratch
Ingredients

1 teaspoon of vanilla extract

2 tablespoons of low fat milk

1 stick of unsalted butter

3 cups of powdered white sugar

Directions for Preparation

For this vanilla frosting recipe, you will require a hand held mixer and a bowl. Before you start mixing the above ingredients, soften the butter by taking out from the freeze. Then, add soften butter, sugar and vanilla extract in the bowl. Whip this mixture, until powdered sugar blends well with butter and vanilla. Transfer this butter mixture into the mixer and then add low fat milk. Process the vanilla frosting until it is thick and creamy. Chill frosting in the freeze for at least half an hour and your delectable vanilla frosting recipe is ready.

Mexican Caramel Café Latte
2 scoops of Mexican Spice Cocoa
14 fl oz of hot milk, or water
1-2 shot of espresso
1 fl oz of caramel syrup or sauce
Add Mexican Spiced Cocoa into 14 oz of hot milk or water. Stir to dissolve, and then
add espresso and caramel syrup/sauce. Stir and serve.

Fiesta Amore Horchata Frappe
11/2 scoops of Fiesta Amore Horchata
4-6 fl oz milk, or water
16 oz ice
Pour Horchata mix, milk and ice a blender. Blend for 30 seconds or until smooth. Pour
into a 16 oz cup, and top with whip cream, cinnamon, and chocolate shavings. Olé.

Fiesta Amore Horchata Latte
Add 11/2 scoops of Horchata mix into 10 oz hot milk. Add 2 oz of espresso. Stir and
Enjoy

This is one of the simplest and most delicious dips for those days when you want to have something quick and creamy.

Ingredients:

Serves 4,

Fat 3 g,

Cal 131,

KJ: 550

WW: 2 Points

1 cup of low fat ricotta cheese

1/4 cup of sweet chili sauce

This is what you do:

Mix the ricotta with the sweet chili sauce, and divide it into 4 parts.

That's it!

Tip: Eat your portion with 10 or 20 rice crackers (1 or 2 WW points extra), for a delicious and crunchy low fat snack.

Low Fat Banana Bread Recipe
This is a great low fat banana bread recipe. It makes about 20 slices, and it carries only 4 grams of fat per slice.

It contains sugar, though. If you cannot have sugar, substitute it with a good artificial sweetener

Now, here is an idea: If you don't have enough banana in this bread, you could actually slice it, and make a banana and low fat feta cheese sandwich.

Serves 20

Fat: 4 g

Cat: 100

KJ: 420

WW: 2 points

Ingredients:

60 grams of low fat spread

1/4 cup of brown sugar

2 eggs

1 cup of mashed banana

1 tsp of vanilla essence

1/2 cup of skim milk

1 cup of whole meal self-raising flour

1 cup of white self raising four

1 tsp bicarbonate of soda

1/3 cup of chopped walnuts (optional, but recommended)

This is what you do:

Pre-heat the oven at 180 C (350 F).

Mix the low fat spread and sugar together, and add the eggs, banana, vanilla essence and milk.

Next, sift together the flours and bicarbonate, and add the mixture to the banana mixture, mixing well, and adding the walnuts.

Prepare a good ovenproof baking tray by placing a baking non-stick piece of paper in the bottom.

Spoon the banana mixture into the tray, and bake for about 50 minutes, or till a tooth pick comes out clean after inserting it into the loaf.

Once baked, take it out of the oven proof tray, and let it cool down before serving.

Source: Healthy Cooking

DELICIOUS BREAD PUDDING WITH VANILLA CREAM SAUCE Recipe

Ingredients:

8 slices whole wheat bread
6 eggs, beaten
1/2 c. sugar
1/4 c. wheat bran
1 to 2 c. raisins
1 tbsp. vanilla flavoring
1/4 c. margarine
4 c. milk
Mix all of above and bake in greased 9x13 inch pan. Sprinkle cinnamon and sugar mixed on top. Bake at 350 degrees for 35 to 45 minutes

VANILLA CREAM SAUCE

2 c. milk (part cream)
1 egg, beaten
1/2 c. sugar
3 tbsp. flour
1 tbsp. vanilla flavoring

Directions:

Mix first 4 ingredients and heat to a boil, add vanilla. Pour over baked pudding. Garnish with cinnamon and sugar mixed


Vanilla Fudge Recipe

Ingredients:

2 1/2 cups sugar
1/2 cup margarine or butter
5-oz. can (2/3 cup) evaporated milk
7-oz. jar (2 cups) marshmallow creme
8 oz. almond bark or vanilla-flavored candy coating, coarsely chopped
3/4 cup chopped walnuts
1 teaspoon vanilla

Directions:

Line 9-inch square or 13x9-inch pan with foil so the foil extends over sides of pan; butter foil. In large saucepan, combine sugar, margarine and milk. Bring to a boil, stirring constantly. Continue boiling 5 minutes, over medium heat, stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Add marshmallow

creme and almond bark; blend until smooth. Stir in walnuts and vanilla. Pour into prepared pan. Cool to room temperature. Score fudge into 36 or 48 squares. Refrigerate until firm. Remove fudge from pan by lifting foil; remove foil from fudge. Using large knife, cut through scored lines. Store in refrigerator.

About 2 1/2 pounds.

Low Fat Brownie Recipes

Looking for low fat brownie recipes? Well, this is your lucky day! These low fat raspberry brownies will sweeten your day without the extra fat or sugar.

Low fat brownies are one of the snacks you may want to keep available for those munchy-ridden days when you feel like having something sweet, but low in fat and sugar.

Kids love these low fat brownies. And you can use them (the brownies, not the kids) as rewards for chores to be done around the house: Flattery and bribery will get you far... ;-)

Serves 8

Fat: 12 g

Cal: 274

KJ: 1151

WW: 5.5 Points

Ingredients:

3 oz (90 g) of light chocolate, coarsely chopped.

4 eggs

1/2 cup of granulated sugar

1 tsp vanilla extract

1/4 tsp salt

1/2 cup of low fat spread, melted

3/4 cup all-purpose flour

1/2 cup low joule raspberry spread able fruit

This is what you do:

Preheat oven to 180 C (350 F).

Spray an 8" square baking pan with canola oil.

Melt the chocolate in a double boiler over simmering water; remove from heat and keep stirring until it goes smooth. Set aside and let it cool down.

Meanwhile, in a large bowl, beat the eggs and sugar with an electric whipper at high speed for about 7 minutes till the eggs and sugar go fluffy. Then beat in the vanilla extract and salt.

Now add the low fat spread and stir it to mix well.

Stir in the flour, mixing well, and pour half of the mixture into medium bowl.

Next, stir the melted chocolate into one portion of the batter and the spread able fruit into the other portion.

Scrape chocolate batter into the prepared pan. Set aside 1/2 cup.

Scrape raspberry batter over the chocolate batter, and scatter spoonfuls of the reserved chocolate batter over the
raspberry batter, using all of the chocolate batter.

With a knife, cut through batter to create a marbled effect.

Bake for about 30 minutes (or until a toothpick inserted in center
comes out almost clean).

Transfer pan to rack; let cool completely and cut into 16 equal squares. That was an easy low fat brownie recipe, wasn't it!?



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U.S. Gold Prices
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, November 08, 2010 - 11:30 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

U.S. Gold Prices

December 31 as of

2000 - $273.60, 2001 - $279.00
2002 - $348.20, 2003 - $416.10
2004 - $438.40, 2005 - $518.90
2006 - $638.00
2007 - $838.00
2008 - $889.00
2009 - $1,096.90

11/1/10 Gold $1,351.30, Silver $24.63, Platinum $1,704..00


We Buy Gold

Streeter Electronics, 603/876-4443

307 Main St, Rte 101, Marlborough, NH 603/876-4443



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Tin Pan Man Prospector
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, November 08, 2010 - 11:30 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

Tin Pan Man Prospector

Got out today to a place I've only been once. Decided to go back today after getting a no from a local to hunt his fields. He took my card and said if he has a change of mind, he'll call me. Great looking location, but no go there. So I decided not to travel to far and tried this new location again.

Swang for about 2 and half hours and found only clad and pennies. It started to sprinkle, but the clouds looked to tell of harder rain to come. Got a dime hit and dug a silver Rosey (solid 12/46). 2 feet away got a 11/38; 12/40; 11/40 and so on. A little bit choppy, but it was next to the dime, so I dug and pulled out the 1821 LC. Nicest LC I've ever dug, just perfect. The soil was mostly sandy and pebbly.

It started to rain a little more steadily, and I had no cover for the E-trac, so I walked back to the car, thinking of going home. Got to the car, and said, shit, I haven’t gotten out much, it's quite here, no bugs, nice and warm, I just found a couple good coins, so I got a large baggie and went back to that area.

20 feet from those two coins I got a solid 12/38, thinking it was another penny, I swang over it 15 times, thinking of not digging the signal. I took two steps away and thought you better at least check the other direction on that signal. When I did, I got a high pitch repeat. Right to my knees and dug a plug. Fished around a bit, and pulled out a large flat button. Yup, right signal, another flat button for the collection. Rubbed a little dirt of and, budda bing, there's the GW script. No more cleaning on this one. Started raining hard again, and so back to the car I went. Brushed it of lightly with a brush and took these pictures.

Went straight to the coin dealer to get plastic cases. Put them in the cases, handed the button to the dealer and he offered me $2000 cash on the spot for the button and $75 for the LC. I decided to hang on to them and show my wife and son tonight.

I've found some decent stuff, but this is my best find. Yes George there is a god, and he's in my plastic case, in my safe, at the moment.

Brian Thomas, alias Tin Pan Man



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Prospecting for Gold in New Hampshire
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, November 08, 2010 - 11:30 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Prospecting for Gold in New Hampshire

New Hampshire is a state that has had a history of mining that goes back to colonial days. This includes mining for gold in both placer and lode deposits. Many of us look upon the prospector is some grizzled old buzzard with a donkey and a gold pan searching for gold in some far western desert or up in the peaks of the New Hampshire is a state that has had a history of mining that goes back to colonial days. This includes mining for gold in both placer and lode deposits. Many of us look upon the prospector is some grizzled old buzzard with a donkey and a gold pan searching for gold in some far western desert or up in the peaks of the Rocky Mountains. This couldn't be farther from the truth than it really is in New Hampshire they have been finding Gold since the state was first settled.
Most of the gold is found in New Hampshire comes from the western counties particularly Grafton County in a belt of rocks that extends across the Connecticut River into Vermont. For the most part the rocks in this area are volcanic rocks of one type or another. Rocks of this nature are known to hold gold in fact gold can be found in just about any of the streams you can find in New Hampshire & Vermont.

A particularly rich area to prospect in the Ammonoosuc Formation found in the western part of the state. Most of this formation is found in Grafton County and apparently is a northern extension of the Bronson Hill Anticlinorium found east of the Connecticut River in Connecticut and Massachusetts. Many like to prospect for gold in Cheshire County too.

Wild Ammonoosuc River

The Wild Ammonoosuc River is located in Landaff, New Hampshire just off of Route 302. There is good access to the water from several pull offs along the river. Please ask permission from the property owners to pan or put in a dredge, trespassers are not taken kindly to. The lower part of the river, below what is known as Big Boulder, has a lot of fine flower gold, some good sized flakes and an occasional nugget. The largest nugget taken by a recreational prospector was about a half ounce. The river gets a lot of pressure in the summer months from prospectors from all over New England, but seems to always turn up enough gold to keep people coming back. Gravel bars down stream near the main branch of the Ammonoosuc River are a lot of fun to work for the small stuff and nests of good sized rocks sometimes produce nice surprises. The general area is in an ancient volcanic mountain string and the decomposing hillsides left enough gold in the streams and floodplains that a small gold rush happened here when miners returned from California. The miners noticed the geologic similarities and found quite a bit of gold for a short time. A few small hardrock mines sprang up but didn't find enough gold to be profitable. These old mines are still visible but too dangerous to enter. New Hampshire has permit process for dredgers but no permit is required for panning.

GRAFTON, NEW HAMPSHIRE

Placer gold can be found in The Ammonoosuc, The Wild Anunonoosuc, Baker, Beebe, Gale, Mad, Salmon, West Branch and Upper Mad Rivers. It can also be found on Notch Brook, Salmon Hole Brook and Tunnel Brook.

Bath

Bath area has numerous old base metal mines which produced a by product of gold.

Lisbon

The Lisbon area mines produced copper, lead, silver and a by product of gold.

Littleton

The Littleton area base metal mines produced a by product of gold. There is a mineralized belt containing many mines. This belt extends form southwest along Route 10 for 12-15 miles. This belt includes Lyman, Lisbon and Bath and produced gold as by product.

Lyman

The Lyman area copper, lead, silver mines produced a by product of gold. The Dodge Mine had a total production of around 2,000 ounces of gold, before the veins pinched out into barren slate at about 100 foot depth.

Tinkervale

Northwest of Tinkervale, on Gardner's Mountain, there are some area base metal mines that produced a by product of gold.

Cheshire County New Hampshire

Just about all streams, brooks & rivers have some gold deposits.



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Treasure Hunter’s Coming Events
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, November 08, 2010 - 11:30 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Treasure Hunter’s Coming Events

For Streeter customers, PTHHS, YTHC, Gazette & NEMDForum members , BONE & St Jude Fund Supporters

CHRISTMAS PARTY & PRIME RIB DINNER


6:00pm, December 12
Campy’s Country Kettle Restaurant
Rte 32 by Keene airport

There are seats available for 60.

It‘s 6:00pm so everyone can make it home early. Party includes, Introductions, Prime Rib dinner, bring your own bottle, & games, door prizes, raffles, & gifts from the manufactures & Streeters, .

Everyone is asked to bring a gift for the humane society and a $10+ value gift for exchange. Cover charge $11 each required by Dec. 10, 2010. Make check payable to PTHHS, & mail to PTHHS, c/o 307 Main St., Marlborough, NH 03455



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Treasure Hunter's Gazette August-September 2010
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, August 16, 2010 - 04:58 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

Treasure Hunter's Gazette August-September 2010

Read the Gazette



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Scooping Curacao
Posted by: Webmaster on Wednesday, June 16, 2010 - 03:35 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Scooping Curacao

By Chris Valerio

It was the last and seventh day of our treasure hunting vacation and we were detecting the last beach for shiny gold jewelry in the sea. As our last dance, this party was just about over. Most of the guys had already made their grand exits from the sea and were waiting at the car, eager to start packing for home. It’s always tough to turn your detector off for the final time on such Caribbean treasure hunting expeditions. But I still had a few more feet of sand to detect. Just ahead of me lie a wide set of old concrete steps leading into and out of the sea, the same steps I had used earlier to enter the waters of Jan Thiel Beach. This is a resort beach very popular with European tourists and I envisioned the luxury of such stairs leading into the water, similar to what the citizens of Rome or Atlantis might have been accustomed to. As I made my way in towards shore, the water became too shallow for me to remain submerged with mask and snorkel. Standing up knee deep water, I approach to the steps still swinging my detector coil from left to right, in hopes of finding just one more piece of gold. Suddenly at the base of the first step I got a loud hit that sounded like gold! Sinking my scoop into just inches of water and sand, I expected a quick and uneventful target recovery. Much to my surprise my scoop bottomed out on something hard, solid rock. No matter what angle of approach tried, I simply could not scoop this target. I was beat and in quitting mode, and started to believe this last target was now sounding more like an aluminum pull tab, with each pass of the coil. Forget about it, echoed through my mind, it’s just another piece of junk. Like the many other pieces scooped before. Another voice whispered “gold”! That’s all it took! Belly flopping back into the shallows I eagerly started fanning the sand away with my hand and quickly exposed a dark bedrock. Much to my delight and lying in a tight crevice was a fat pinky size gold ring glittering in the Caribbean sun! I savored the moment, then quickly snatched the booty. “Yes” raced through my mind! This ring of gold had some black on it, so had been lost in the sea a long time. It looks old with no markings inside. The setting somewhat like a crown and the jewel that once sat there was missing. It seemed like this ring might have been in the sea for some 50 years or more? That’s nearly older than dirt! Wow, what a mystery and I knew right then that I would never scrap this piece. I can just envision a deep green emerald, red ruby or blue sapphire stone nestled back in this King setting. A real treasure and the only piece I had not scooped in Curacao. It was hand fanned, a very exciting way to uncover treasure!


Curacao is a small Caribbean island under Dutch influence situated near Aruba and Venezuela, South America, and within the Netherlands Antilles, a Constitutional monarchy. Part of the ABC islands (Aruba, Bonaire, Curacao), Curacao is the largest and most populated. More than 140,000 call Curacao home. The Capital and largest city is Willemstad and languages spoken there are Dutch, indigenous Papiamento, some English and naturally Spanish. For such a small island that can get rather confusing, but is the result of Curacao’s very colorful past. And Curacao is a colorful land! You can read all about Curacao online at Wikipedia. All 13 pages! In a nutshell Curacao is a wonderful place to detect for lost gold in the sea. The climate is more arid and the blue seas beautiful. Just my kind of island! Oh, Curacao is the home of the famous liqueur, Blue Curacao.

However, I was not there alone this past May 11 thru 18th, 2010. Accompanying me were 6 other eager Gold Bugs. Our fearless leader George Streeter of Streeter Electronics, Don Foster, Roman Hajek, and Martin Miffek all from New Hampshire, Mr. Gold Master of New York, Charlie Anderson of Florida and of course yours truly from way out West in Washington State. That makes for a sizeable group of 7 treasure hunters. The only new guy to me of the bunch was Martin. While as treasure hunters we are all brothers, Martin is obscurely related to Roman and considered his real brother. Fine by me. This was Martin’s first Caribbean treasure hunting vacation, clearly however, Martin knew what he was doing with his detector. Being the new guy, I tended to study Martin the most. He seemed to capture my attention, curiosity and imagination like few before. Picture a stocky younger man about 5- 10 tall with a long dark and full head of hair combed back. Martin is originally from Czechoslovakia and speaks very good English with a slight European style accent. Intimidating at first, Martin would be a natural for a Nordic Viking movie. I can just see him raiding the Sultans Harem like in a Viking film I saw many years ago as a boy! A man of few words and definitely Politically incorrect, I like Martin, a lot! He is funny and often made me laugh with his antics and words. Laughter is good and I need more of that medicine in my life. Good stuff! Because I grew up in Germany for several years I could relate to Martin very well. Why I even started responding to Martin with some German words and accent, not sure if he even noticed? Martin is a good friend of George and as usual, any friend of George is a friend of mine! Martin is a good man to have on your side and when we parted ways at the airport, I realized just how much I would miss my newfound friend. Martin’s last words to me as we shook hands were, “What, that’s it?”.

George put this trip together and this was my second trip to Curacao for gold in some 5 years time. We rented a 12 passenger Toyota Hi Ace van from Avis and I was the official driver. Roman rode shotgun as navigator and did an excellent job pointing us in the right direction. Thanks to Roman we got around! We also rented a gated and spacious villa with swimming pool from Hellen and Edward Chirino. Each man had his own bed and our rooms were air-conditioned. The kitchen and dining areas were huge and Charlie and Roman did the cooking for us hungry treasure hunters. Charlie makes great pancakes and Roman a mean spaghetti sauce with meatballs. By the way, Mr. Gold master cooks up quite a tasty cheese omelet. I even studied his non-burning technique just like when watching a cooking show back home! Our villa also had a big screen TV, internet access (but we forgot to ask for the computer), stereo, 2 large electric fans, landline telephone, a cell phone which we used along with a calling card to phone home several times, a long, long outside wet bar, covered parking, laundry room, areas and hoses to rinse off our gear with fresh water and a big outdoor gathering table. This villa easily accommodates 7. Just down the road is a full size supermarket where we did our food shopping along with 2 restaurants. One an Italian joint is where we celebrated Georges 40th birthday- really! The food, company and atmosphere were wonderful and we had an exciting night polishing off an entire bottle of Baileys Irish Cream after dinner! Although George did have the lions share! Which reminds me, what happens in Curacao, stays in Curacao! So I guess I had better change the subject!


Our villa setting was near perfect and centrally located on the island. The villa owners are very nice and accommodating too. Edward even met us at the airport so we could follow him to the villa and not get lost. The villa is called Rooi Catootje and is listed on VRBO.com. I highly recommend this villa and Hellen can be reached by email at rooicatootjevilla@gmail.com . Tell them that the Streeter party sent you.

Each morning Charlie woke us up around 6 AM and prepared breakfast and hot coffee. He really rattled those pots and pans, so there was little chance of sleeping in! Usually we were in the water detecting for gold before 9 AM. Sometime around 1 PM we would stop for lunch, then hit another beach and detect until 5 PM or so before heading back to our villa. We all stuck together as a group and got along very well. There was some squabbling every now and then, but plenty of laughter too. It can be difficult at times to get 7 guys to agree on anything! Especially since as men we are all somewhat experts and hardly ever wrong, right? Yet we sure were smart about our detectors of choice used to find gold. We exclusively used Minelab Excaliburs. Excaliburs are almost like gold magnets and simply find the most gold in the sea for us, in the shortest amount of time. If there were a better water detector for doing this we would use it. Nothing can touch an Excalibur for consistently finding gold in the sea, nothing! Anyone hoping to join George on one of his treasure hunting vacations will have to buy a detector from him. That’s understandable as George makes his living selling detectors and not operating metal detecting tours. Sharing expenses as a group makes these vacations rather affordable. Besides, George will give you the best deals on treasure hunting equipment, along with good advice worth thousands of dollars! Visit Streeter Electronics online (www.streeter.org) or email George at gstreeter@ne.rr.com to get you Excalibur! Also ask about subscribing to George’s treasure hunting rag, Treasure Hunter’s Gazette. Every treasure hunter worth their salt should subscribe. It’s a wonderful and very interesting treasure read!

I like Curacao. They have a wonderful butterfly farm there and if you are into pink flamingos, they’ve got em too! Even when sober! Along with small lizards, colorful birds and large iguanas! Why I bet they even have snakes there too! Along with many, many beaches to explore with interesting names such as Seaquarium, Caracasbaai, Barbara, Hook’s Hut, Kontiki, Mambo, Cas Abao, Jeremi and more, including my favorite Caribbean beach of all time, Playa Kenapa! I just love that beach! Furthermore the local people seem very friendly. Stop and ask for directions and often they offer to get in the car to show you the way. Even when they are busy! Plus unlike elsewhere in the Caribbean most of the drivers in Curacao are very courteous! They drive sane, do not tailgate, no matter how slow you are driving, and will actually stop to let you merge into traffic or make a turn! I’m very impressed and heard little horn honking! Oh, they have a few casinos too in Curacao. On one night we went to such an establishment and I won $110 in short order! Not much of a gambler, I took my winnings and went home! Then there was the day Roman arranged for a small power boat to take us to Barbara beach by water, because that was the only was to access this privately owned stretch of sand. As with most places in the Caribbean, the waters are fair game to all. So if you can approach even a private beach by water, you can detect that beach, so long as you stay in the water! We had a good time there and the boat ride was enjoyable and refreshing.

So what about the gold? Well, we found some 40 pieces. Not as much as usual, but some gold is better than none! Mr. Gold master found the most, 11 pieces. What did we expect with a name like that? That name alone gives him an advantage from the start! Martin and I each found 7 pieces and everyone else found gold too! We would have liked to have scooped more, but that was not in the cards on this trip. Little did we know that a recent tropical storm had hit the island, pulling most of the sand along with the lost gold out to sea! Gold is where you find it and we spent many man-hours looking. We found some gold and had a very good time doing so! Even as a rich man I would still detect for gold in the sea. But just looking for gold with good friends makes one wealthy! Yes, seeing glittering gold in your scoop on a Caribbean beach is thrilling, as is the monetary value of such finds. But the experience and detecting buddies are the real treasures along with fond memories to last a lifetime! When in the rocker, I’ll be able to think back on those fine days!

Every time I go with George on one of his vacations I’m reminded just how much I enjoy treasure hunting. My problem is I just have way too many hobbies and interests and am spread too thin. There is only so much free time and I have some choices to make. I enjoy big game hunting in exotic places, fishing and camping. I also have a small espresso business to grow. There are finances also related to all of these. The best thing about treasure hunting is one can do it anytime. There is no season on treasure. Just grab your detector and go! In the end I believe treasure hunting will win out with me. I might even like to hunt for treasure full time someday, just like Mr. Gold master does! It’s the history, research, looking for, gold fever, anticipation and the finding that makes this hobby great! Throw in some Caribbean sunshine and one truly is in Paradise! To all, may the gold be with you, Chris. cabochris@msn.com



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Confessions of a Professional Treasure Hunter Part: 14
Posted by: Webmaster on Wednesday, June 16, 2010 - 03:35 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Confessions of a Professional Treasure Hunter Part: 14

By El Cazador

My Captain had the foresight to get his boat out of the water just before the storm hit the Gulf Coast. It was the largest boat of its type that could still be put on a trailer and we used that advantage every chance we could. My journal states, “My day started at 7:00AM with a call from my Captain (by now I am usually staying over at Lexie’s house for obvious reasons) telling me to come pick him up because we had to move the boat and get it out of the water.” We had to have the “new” engine looked at for its 50 hour checkup. This was the second powerhead on the engine.” We would eventually end up using three. The third Johnson one was a charm I guess.

After the storm, “Some of the shrimp boats were leaning into their docks as we passed by; the lines were tight and were straining against the rising tide.” The “tide” was rising because all of the water from the storm, dropped in the form of rain, was now coming down the rivers including the Carrabelle River.

Also, “The home we were living in was damaged. A large portion of the roof shingles came off and allowed some of the water to come in and drip down one wall in my room. The sea wall in the back of this home disintegrated quite a bit. Lexie’s home being better built and further from the shoreline stood up well and only lost a few shingles in the storm.”

Back to treasure hunting. We “mowed the lawn” for weeks at a time after the storm with the side scan sonar equipment in the waters of the Gulf of Mexico. We worked as much as we could off the coast of Florida in the summer of 1994. We would spear fish after work and would trade the fish for spear guns and diving equipment. The people that owned the Tiki Bar also owned the dive shop. We once brought May, the owner of the Tiki Bar, 30lbs of grouper in one day and she did not know what to do with all of that fish. May even asked us to clean the fish too. Right. I said to her that, “You should sell grouper sandwiches at the Tiki Bar.” Several days later May asked us for more fish because she was selling a ton of grouper sandwiches at the bar!

My Captain is driving right now up to New Hampshire to get the side scan sonar equipment repaired. One side of the paper records is not being printed because the machine is not working for some reason. I don’t doubt it with all of the movement, pounding on the water and salt air. I am surprised the thing works at all. The underside of that machine is a complicated set of wires and electrical panels. I would not know where to begin to fix this thing.

I am now acting captain and am doing Mag (magnetometer) work with

“Big Bad Biker Bob”, a member of the search crew from another boat. Bob looks like a large version of Captain Nemo and even though he has more experience on the water than I, dutifully saw me as Captain since I was usually working on this boat. I like Bob for a number of reasons including his gentle character. We went to coordinates provided to me by my Captain and I later realized that these were test coordinates from him to see if I really knew what I was doing. I performed my duties fully, as did Bob, and mugged the area for any metal anomalies. We found one large anomaly which was the sunken barge that my Captain knew we would find if we were anywhere near the area we were sent to by him. We found the barge just fine; he had taught me well.

When my captain returned from New Hampshire with a repaired side scan sonar machine we continued our search of the floor of the Gulf of Mexico. My journal reads, Aug. 6th, 1994, “I found another anchor today.” While diving on an unusually large reef for this area of the Gulf of Mexico I came across another anchor. “The weather was bad in the early part of the day so we searched for a fishing boat that we heard had sunk nearby. We found a wonderful reef and part of the ship but not the main hull. When I was down I saw two nurse sharks and a ray. Half way through my dive I saw something sticking out of the sand no more than two feet and swam over to investigate. There are few straight lines in nature and it looked possibly man made. When I saw the square hole for the stock I realized it was an anchor. It was about six feet tall and light enough that my Captain and I could haul it onto the boat to return to shore.”

This anchor was similar to the one I found a few months before but was smaller. This new anchor was about six feet long and was stuck under a rock and lying on its side. It had the same triangular hole at the top for the former wooden cross- arm stock and it was just as rusty. The anchor was also lost in what appeared to be the early 1800’s but it was hard to tell. Anchor origins and dates are one of the most difficult things to judge in marine artifacts. They all look similar and few have markings. Anchors could also be used for a long time and by a variety of countries. An anchor may have been traded or salvaged so it’s hard to tell the difference between when and where an anchor was made and when it was lost. So far I have found the only two old nautical items on this trip and we had up to five boat/ships and crews during this season of searching. I’m sure it was just my beginner’s luck so far.



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The Minelab 705
Posted by: Webmaster on Wednesday, June 16, 2010 - 03:34 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

The Minelab 705

There are many choices, in many price ranges, for today’s detectorist. The Minelab 705 may fit a niche for a lot of detectorists; those that are new to the hobby, as well as those that are looking for an upgrade from an entry level or older technology machine.

We are faced with many complicated decisions when we purchase a metal detector. The high end detectors, such as the White’s v3 and Minelab’s E-Trac, are superb machines and well worth the price tags in both features and performance. Your budget aside, in order to use these machines to their fullest potential, one has to religiously devote the effort to understand and utilize their great features. Minelab’s E-Trac has an excellent 200+ page book by Andy Sabisch devoted to its optimal operation – not everyone wants to work that hard learning their machine. Although you can “kill it” with these detectors, the learning curve and complicated operations may be frustrating to many users. On the other hand, buying an entry-level detector with few features and poor quality also may be a poor decision for the new or experienced hobbyist. If I had the cash, I would love an E-Trac with a Sunray probe, alas…

Minelab’s 705 may be an excellent compromise in this wide spectrum of price, performance and features. The 705 offers the flexibility of a coin/treasure mode and as well as a prospecting and all metal modes. Given the fact that we are located in New England, I won’t elaborate at all on the prospecting mode here. Although technically, (out of the box), the 705 is a single frequency machine, with optional coils it can be a three frequency machine.

The 705 is equipped with a standard 9” concentric coil and can be upgraded to Minelab’s 10-11” Double-D coils that are available in three frequencies, depending on your needs. As you may know, concentric coils shoot and receive their signals in an inverted cone and coverage width decreases with the depth – a Double-D coil is a great option as it shoots a swath as wide as the coil to its maximum depth. Both factory coils operate similarly as far as signal interpretation and general operations. It is said that a concentric coil pinpoints better than a Double-D. I don’t believe that to be true; the great pinpointing ability of a Double-D can be demonstrated by George, Dave, or any competent user. Given the wide swath of the Double-D, that option is the way to go.

The user interface and controls on the 705 are simple and intuitive. The LCD screen, though far less informative than the E-Trac, provides a completely adequate idea of what you are picking up in the ground.

These pieces of information come to you during your coin and relic search, in both coin and all metal modes, explained below.

Sound The 705 emits 4 detection tones depending on the metal - A 130 Hz tone for most ferrous metals, a 450 Hz tone for the gold and aluminum ranges, a 700 Hz tone for more conductive brass and copper, and the highest 950 Hz tone for silver up to hot rocks. These four tones allow you to visually scan your surroundings instead of staring at a screen. Being able to survey your surroundings while detecting with tones, allows you to possibly see or interpret terrain signals like a swale in the ground that might have the filled in cellar (honey) hole. It can also help prevent the proverbial stick in the eye. J

Numerical and Meter The other two modes work simultaneously with the sounds and provide a visual interpretation of the target. The screen numbers corresponding with the meter. Generally speaking, I have found the following readings with various metals. Ferrous from -8 to 2, nickels at 12, most gold (and pull-tabs) at 18, brass and many similar alloys at 26-28, small common cents from 30-32, dimes 36-38, silver dollars 38-42, and quarters and big copper’s 40-42. All these numbers reflect depend on ground mineralization, haloing, position (sideways or flat), and nearby trash.

Depth Meter The 705 has a simple scale on the right side of the LCD that shows up to 6 arrows, each arrow signifying 2 inches.

False and Silly Signals No detector is perfect. Due to its mass, a large hunk of iron that is at 2 feet may signal at the higher (metal quality) readings and show 2 inches under the surface. Different alloys, old style cans, and many relics can give a false or multiple signals. As an example, if you hit a 42 at 2 inches and the signal goes to -6, 24, 46, etc., it could mean that there is a hunk-o-junk that is very large. Old beer cans have a combination of aluminum and steel and can make you think you have hit the mother lode. Hot rocks, especially those from modern quarries, can be filled with various ores that give zany signals. Usually if you come at the signal from 90 degrees from where you first obtained a signal the true colors of the hunk-o-junk come through. Keep in mind that multiple signals may be that a nice coin is mixed with a field of junk. Digging or not is up to you.

I like to use the all metal mode (no discrimination) with a moderate sensitivity (16-18) and use the screen readings and tones from the detector. When in coin mode or with any discrimination, the 705 nulls out iron and whatever else you choose to discriminate. If you are detecting a trashy area (cellar hole) that has lots of nails, your threshold/discrimination setting may null out the better finds. Using the readings and tones, you can see and hear those high quality signals and then turn on the discrimination if needed. Having the 705 set in all metal has the effect of “connecting” me with what is under the ground.

The 705 has a lot of other features. It has a respectable pinpointing mode, a pinpoint sizing mode, it is highly customizable to your needs and individual scenarios. It is not a v3 or an E-Trac but in my opinion it is a great value. Like any other detector, much of the success is dependent on the user and not the machine.

Happy Hunting

“NH Detector”

nhdetector@gmail.com



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Indians of N.H.
Posted by: Webmaster on Wednesday, June 16, 2010 - 03:34 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

Indians of N.H.

From the late Mike Hapsis

before his death in 1997.

The two great Indian tribes east of the Mississippi were the Iroquois and Algonquin families.

The Iroquis were a fierce, war-like people made up of a confederacy of five nations: the Mohawks, Oneidas, Onondagas, Cayugas, and Senecas. Their conquests extended from Quebec to the Carolinas, from the western prairies to the forests of Maine.

The Algonquin family extended from Hudson’s Bay on the North to the Carolinas on the south; from the Atlantic on the east to the Mississippi on the west.

This name Algonquin is a family name. The various divisions and subdivisions have many names. The people of Eastern Canada and of New Hampshire and Maine had the name Wabenaki, or as more commonly used, Albenaki, or Abnaki, which means peasants or people of the east.

The Albenaki people were fairly well distributed over a considerable area of country, which is now represented upon the map of New England as lying within the boundary line of Maine & New Hampshire.

The land occupied by the tribes did not extend far back from the coast inland except upon the larger rivers. It began around the St John to the eastward, & terminated southward, north of the Merrimack River.

Because of similarity of customs & tradition, the Etchimins who occupied eastern Maine & New Nrunswick, and the Micmacs or Souriquois who lived in Nova Scotia, were considered to be one nation with the Abenaki.

Their system of government was practically the same, their movements being directed by one man, who was designated as the sachem, who might have been assisted in his functions of ruling his tribe by councilors or subordinated sachems, who were the heads of subdivisions of the great family. The chief ruler of the Abenaki was known as the “Bashaba” who was supposed to be the head of the 8 tribes comprised of the Penobscots, Passamaquodies, Wawenocks, Norrigewocks, Anasagunticooks, Sokokis, Penacooks & Malecites. These several tribes had their individual sachems, and as these tribes were divided into families, or clans, these latter were directed in their affairs by a lesser sachem.



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Willard Spaulding
Posted by: Webmaster on Tuesday, May 04, 2010 - 01:14 PM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Willard Spaulding

One day while scouting for turkey sign with my brother, we came upon an abandoned property well away from any houses or main roads. The property, on the East or Log Cabin Road, was close to a stream, had a well, barn, and appeared promising for an artifact search.

I returned home and consulted some maps that told me that one Willard Spaulding and family resided there. Returning a few days later, I worked it over pretty good – leaving no damage or litter to the property – the holes I dig are probably healed by now. Not too lucrative, after numerous searches I found a brass ball-style button, in the road in front of the house.

My artifact searching usually involves a bit of historical research both before and after the metal detector is fired up. Being a nerd-dork, I therefore have a number of maps and historical books of Cheshire County. While thumbing through a town history book, written in the 1800’s, I stumbled on the name W. Spaulding in the list of taxpayers in the early part of the 18th century. Upon further reading, I learned that Willard was involved in a lot of town activities and was highly respected. His counsel was sought in many important town decisions. He was married to Abigail Taylor in 1828 by the prolific and long lived Reverend Isaac Robinson, who was ordained minister of the Congregational church in 1802. They bore a son W. Benton Spaulding some time in early 1834.

I decided to grab another book on local cemeteries and discovered that Willard, his wife Abigail, and son were buried in a local cemetery. In the same cemetery are the remains of a Taylor family – Danforth Esq. who died in 1858 at age 88, his wives Martha who died in 1829 at age 34 and Tabitha who passed away in 1859 at age 89. It possibly could be that Abigail Taylor Spaulding could have been a relation to Danforth, perhaps his daughter. When Abigail was born in 1799, Danforth would have been 30 years old. His wife at the time, Martha, would have only been 5 years old at Abigail’s birth, undoubtedly not Abigail’s mother. Perhaps Danforth had a previous marriage that begat Abigail and that wife was buried elsewhere. Taylor, however, was a common name in early New England; Abigail could have been no relation to Danforth, and the only coincidence between the two is that they were buried in the same cemetery. From further examination of the cemetery records, Willard seemed to have had a sad last few years of his life. In 1864 his son died at 30 years, 6 months, 18 days – perhaps serving his country in the Civil War. In 1865 wife Abigail passed away at age 66, they were married some 38 years. Willard himself, passed away at the age of 68 in 1866.

While again thumbing through the old history, I came across a section that was titled “Casual and accidental deaths in the last fifty years”. In that section there was short passage that said, “Willard Spaulding, went fishing alone in a canoe and was drowned.”

I will find other buttons in the future and perhaps I shouldn’t get so connected with the people that resided in the cellar holes I search. The odds of the button being Willard’s are slim, yet I was compelled to visit Willard’s grave and tuck the button in the ground next to his grave – and wish him well.

In closing, this is an epitaph on a stone of Lucy Willson, age 10 years, in the same cemetery where old Willard was laid to rest:

“Stop passengers as you pass by

As you are so once was I;

As I am now, so you must be

And so prepare to follow me.”

John Quist

john.a.quist@gmail.com



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Be a Cellar Dweller
Posted by: Webmaster on Tuesday, May 04, 2010 - 01:13 PM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Be a Cellar Dweller

One of the reasons that I started in the detecting hobby in the early 80’s was the prevalence of searchable places, primarily cellar holes in Cheshire County, where my parents had land since the late 50’s. When I bought my first detector, a White’s 4 DB from George, I was in the woods in an hour. Somewhat successful with relics and a few buttons, I returned from my yearly vacation to my home in Corning, NY and continued on a mostly coin searching focus. In 2006 I returned to live in the area to take care of my elderly parents. I looked forward to restarting my hobby and subsequently purchased a Minelab from George last year.

New Hampshire, and most of New England, is plastered with cellar holes. If I spent every day of the rest of my life looking in just the cellar holes in my town of Stoddard, I could never cover 5% of them.

When beginning your cellar hole search plan, the first step to take is research. Lots and lots of research. Visit your local Historical Society and library to start gathering information. In regards to my town, there are two historical books and five maps drawn before 1900. The maps, however valuable, all seem to contradict each other. In one map an old school is on the inside of a corner, another on the outside, and another has it 500 yards south. Your best ally in order to find a good searchable spot truly lies between your ears, not on the map. Many of the old mapmakers and historians relied on hearsay, not actual documented facts – it can be safely said that much of the information on the old maps is based on verbal lore - “the Borden place, which burnt down in 1840, was 2 rods past Whistler’s Rock on Eaton’s Road.” – And so it gets placed on the map. Also many of the potential hot spots could not be on the map. If they are, these old dwellings could be marked with an X or not at all.

Although it takes much more time and effort, a scouting mission without detector is in a good bet. When that machine is on, you are looking at your feet, not at the big picture. A scouting mission is an investment in future opportunities.

Scouting:

These people were not lazy; no one who farmed and logged in Colonial New England could be called lazy; however they mostly took the easy way out. Look for evidence near the road that you are on. The early settlers didn’t have a need for a view or long driveway; they needed an easy way to move feed, animals, and wood, to commerce. For the early farmer, access to the road, stream, pasture, or barn, needed to be short and sweet – keep your scouting mission close by.

Search the terrain and seek the flat spots. The cellar hole or foundation is going to be on a high flat spot. When peering off into the woods look for that flat area or mound within 100 yards of the road. Head to it or just above it and open your mind! If there is no cellar hole there, look for rocks in the corners where foundation logs may have been laid on.

A week ago I was out scouting a formerly heavily populated road, now abandoned. Many, many cellar holes dot the landscape; many of those cellar holes have been visited by my detecting brethren. A full 100 yards from the nearest mapped and documented cellar hole, I noticed an interesting flat spot and the slightest evidence of a path. In walking in from the road, I could see no evidence of a building or cellar. When walking back to the road, I tripped over something. I looked down and saw a carved keystone and it all came into view – examining each corner of the flat area under the leaves and forest duffle, was the corner stones of an old building that didn’t exist on any map. I may not find anything worth while there but rest assured that I wouldn’t have found this spot with my Minelab in my hand. It is now on my GPS for sure.

If successful, scan out from the area and imagine yourself in the mind of the settler – how they lived and worked. Ordinarily, you will begin to picture the layout of the property that has a commonality with many other old properties in your searches. The main house is usually situated in a high spot close to the road or entrance to the property. Close by the house is the main family water well. If you look at the main foundation there will be large stones or slabs that appear carved – generally, those are the entrances to the dwelling – one often to the front facing the road, and the other on the side. The side entrance often heads to the well and in the direction towards the barn and main work areas – look about 30 yards from that entrance and you may see another foundation that would be the barn. That foundation, depending on the family finances, may be a full above-ground foundation or just a few rocks that held some logs for the barn’s side walls. Near that barn, may be the evidence of a corral for the family animals. Somewhere close to the sources of “fertilizer” would have been the family garden. Downhill from the house and well would have been the family privy or outhouse. If there is a stream or body of clean water nearby, that could have been the family bathing and clothes washing area – you would expect that this area would be above the privy.

The Artifact Search:

Put yourself in the mindset of the residence of the property and how they lived and worked. Although the cellar hole itself is tempting, with dreams of coin and jewelry caches, it is generally a collapsed or burnt building. The main cellar and immediate few feet around the perimeter are often littered with nails and their halos – an almost solid ferrous mess. Worth examining though are the front and/or side entrances, and the paths from these entrances to the road, wells, privy, and barn/work areas.

The rock walls surrounding the property offer the temptation of caches and riches. Perhaps yes, but your searches should focus on areas where people worked and transacted business. Importantly, when you move a stone in a rock wall or old foundation, then you become susceptible to the gray areas in the historical artifact laws. In my opinion, its best to leave them be.

Are there random large rocks and around the house and work areas? They could be resting and visiting areas. The entrances to the properties, close to the house and barn, hold promise for a place where monetary transactions might have been made. Always remember, if there are rocks on the ground underfoot where these entrances are, or there are rocks overturned with less moss than the others, the area is more than likely a logging egress that was made by loggers well after the historical period that people resided.

Check in the road. Often, peddlers, neighbors, and traders would stop by in the road and business was transacted right in the road either in front of the main house or in front of the barns and work areas. Families often were entering wagons and mounting horses in the road itself. I have been more successful finding coins in the surrounding roads than I have near the dwellings and barns.

Cellar holes and abandoned properties are an aspect of the hobby that is both more difficult and rewarding. The good ones take time to get to and are often overgrown and hard to search. Yet they are fun to research and can potentially yield interesting and valuable find. Look at them from a different perspective and happy hunting.

John Quist

john.a.quist@gmail.com



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Recipes
Posted by: Webmaster on Tuesday, April 06, 2010 - 02:48 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Recipes

A Healthy Role For Garlic

(NAPSI)-A recent study that may be to everyone's taste found that garlic may prevent and potentially reverse or disperse arteriosclerosis plaque formation. Arteriosclerosis, a progressive thickening and hardening of the arterial walls, can result in heart disease, which is the leading killer of Americans today.

Conducted by Dr. Günter Siegel director at the Benjamin Franklin Clinic of the Free University of Berlin/Germany, the research reveals how exceptionally powerful a role garlic can play in protecting against this harmfully progressive condition.

These findings provide further evidence that taking a daily dosage of 300 mg of Kwai Garlic may help prevent arterial plaque buildup or even reverse or disperse existing plaque. Kwai was the only brand used in the study and is available in drug, food and other fine specialty stores nationwide.

To learn more about the study, visit www.abkit.com or call 800-226-6227.

New research highlights garlic's role in dispersing plaque formations which harden the arteries.

Bahamian Peas & Rice

6 strips of bacon, diced
1 small onion, diced
1 small green pepper, diced
1 stalk celery, diced
1 (15 ounce) can pigeon peas, drained
¼ cup tomato paste
2-cups rice
2 1/2 cups water
1-teaspoon fresh thyme
Salt and pepper to taste

Fry bacon until it is crisp. Add the onion, green pepper, and celery and cook until the mixture is pulpy.

Add tomato paste and cook until most of the liquid has evaporated. Add the drained pigeon peas and all spices and for cook for 2 minutes.

Add water and bring mixture to boil - seasoning to taste. Pour in the rice...cover the pot tightly and simmer until all the liquid is absorbed, around 15 minutes.

Coconut Mousse

2 tins coconut cream
1/2 cup milk
15 gelatin leaves
2 liters heavy cream
8 ounces sugar
1 1/2 cups coconut

Method:
Warm the milk, coconut cream and sugar. Add the soaked gelatin and the grated coconut. Allow the base to cool. Whip cream before and keep cool. At the end fold the whipped cream into the base, fill into mousse rings and refrigerate.

Mango & Strawberry Cheese Cake 5lbs cream cheese

2 1/2lbs sugar
12 eggs
5 egg yolks
3 oz corn starch
Mango puree to the taste

Method:
Add cornstarch to sugar in a mixer and stir to combine, add cream cheese to sugar mixture and mix until smooth. Incorporate egg yolk eggs and mango puree. Pour mixture onto a graham cracker coated pan bake 200 degrees for 35-40 min. After cooling top with strawberry pie filling.

Mint & Honey Fruit Delight Grapes

Watermelon
Honeydew melon
Cantaloupe melon
Papaya
Mango
1/4 cup chopped mint
1 cup honey

Method:
Chop all fruits into 1/2 inch cubes put in a bowl sprinkle mint leaves and drizzle with honey. Refrigerate for 3 hours to allow fruit juices to mix with honey and form a minty sweet sauce.

Curacao is the largest of the five islands of the Netherlands Antilles and lies in the Caribbean sea just 60 km off the Venezuelan coast outside the hurricane belt.

Curacao

For centuries Curacao has earned its reputation in global Trade. Today the island still thrives on international business with services ranging from oil refinery and export to international financial services. This has given the island a cosmopolitan outlook.
Curacao has a rich cultural heritage and in December 1997 the Historic Area of Willemstad was placed on the World Heritage List of UNESCO. Willemstad, the capital of Curacao, is also the seat of Government.
Curacao is a real different vacation destination in the Caribbean with shopping, heritage and culture as the main attractions. Small, secluded beaches will give you a private experience with great diving opportunities.

Curacao liqueur Recipes

South Coast Cocktail Drink Recipe
1/4 oz fresh Lemon Juice
1 1/4 oz Soda Water
1 1/4 oz Scotch Whisky
1 tsp Simple Syrup
1/4 oz Curacao
Directions
Mix all ingredients together in a mixing glass with ice. Stir gently and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with flamed orange peel, and serve.

Dutch Trade Winds Drink Recipe
2 oz Gin
1 tsp Sugar Syrup
1/2 oz Lemon Juice
1/2 oz Curacao
Directions
Pour all ingredients into a cocktail shaker half-filled with ice cubes. Shake well, strain into a cocktail glass, and serve.

Curled Satan's Whiskers Drink Recipe
1 dash Orange Bitters
1/2 oz Dry Vermouth
1/2 oz Curacao
1/2 oz Orange Juice
1/2 oz Gin
1/2 oz Sweet Vermouth
Directions
Pour all ingredients into an old-fashioned glassold-fashioned glass 1/4 filled with ice cubes. Stir well, and serve.

Hispaniola Drink Recipe
1 jigger Curacao
2 splashes Sweet and Sour Mix
1 jigger Dark Rum
Directions
Combine ingredients in an old-fashioned glass. Add ice and a cherry. Stir.

Cosmopolitan Delight Drink Recipe
1/2 oz Curacao
1/4 oz Orgeat Syrup
1 splash Red Wine
3/4 oz fresh Lemon Juice
1/2 oz Simple Syrup
1 1/2 oz Brandy
Directions
Shake all ingredients with ice and serve over ice in an old-fashioned glass. Top with a splash of red wine. Garnish with fresh fruit, and serve.

Grape-Nut Pudding

Ingredients:
1 1/2 lb Quick Cooking Tapioca
3/4 c Raisins
1 c Boiling Water
1/4 c Grape-Nuts
1/4 c Brown Sugar
1/2 teaspoon Vanilla Extract

Preparation:
In a heavy saucepan, stir together tapioca, boiling water, brown sugar, raisins and Grape-Nuts. Let stand for 5 minutes. Over high heat, bring the tapioca mixture to the boil Stir well to prevent sticking. Boil for 1 minute. Remove the saucepan from the heat and stir in vanilla. Serve hot with cream.

Serves 3

American-Italian Pasta Salad

Ingredients:
1 (16 ounce) package fussily pasta
2 (2 ounce) cans sliced black olives
1 cup frozen petite peas, thawed
1 cup cubed Genoa salami
3/4 cup chopped green onions
3/4 cup chopped celery
1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley
1 (.7 ounce) package dry Italian-style salad dressing mix
1 cup mayonnaise
1 cup sour cream
2 tablespoons milk

Preparation:
1. In a large pot of salted boiling water, cook pasta until al dente, rinse under cold water and drain. 2. In medium bowl combine mayonnaise, sour cream, milk and Italian dressing mix. Whisk together until smooth, set aside. In large salad bowl combine cooked and cooled pasta, peas, green onions, celery and parsley. Add dressing last and mix. (You may want to reserve about 1/2 cup of the dressing) Let sit over night in fridge. (Pasta will soak up dressing.) Stir before serving. Add extra dressing if pasta appears dry.

Serves 6

Spicy Pasta Salad

Ingredients:
1 pound penne pasta
1 (15 ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained
2 green onions, chopped
1/2 (6 ounce) can black olives, chopped
1/4 cup sun-dried tomatoes, softened in water and sliced
1/4 cup crumbled feta cheese
16 ounces Italian-style salad dressing

Preparation:

1. In a large pot of salted boiling water, cook pasta until al dente, rinse under cold water and drain. 2. In a large bowl, combine the pasta, beans, green onions, olives, sun dried tomatoes and feta cheese. Add enough salad dressing to coat; toss and chill before serving.

Serves 9

Fettuccine with Scallops and Peas

Ingredients:
2 c Fresh peas (or 10-oz pkg frozen)
2 tabs Unsalted butter, cut into bits
3/4 lb Fettuccine
Saffron butter sauce
1 1/4 lb Sea scallops, rinsed, patted

Preparation:
In a saucepan of boiling salted water, cook peas for 3-5 minutes (fresh may take slightly longer.) or until they are just tender. Drain well. In a kettle of boiling salted water, cook the pasta until it is al dente, drain, and transfer it to a large skillet. Meanwhile, arrange scallops in a steamer over boiling water, season them with salt and pepper and steam them, covered, for 2-3 minutes, or until they are just cooked through. To the pasta, add the butter, peas, and salt and pepper to taste. Heat the mixture through, over low heat, tossing it well. Add the scallops and the saffron butter sauce and toss well. Serve hot.

Serves 6

Bronzed Talapia

Ingredients:
2/3 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1/2 teaspoon onion powder
1/2 teaspoon dry mustard
1/3 teaspoon garlic powder
1/3 teaspoon white pepper
1/3 teaspoon ground cumin
1/3 teaspoon dried basil
1/3 teaspoon dried oregano
1 1/3 dashes black pepper
1 1/3 dashes dried thyme
4 talapia fillets
vegetable cooking spray

Preparation:
Combine the seasonings mix ingredients in a small bowl. Sprinkle each side of each fillet evenly with 1/2 teaspoon of this mixture. Preheat a 10-inch skillet over high heat to 400°, about 5 minutes. Spray the top side of each fillet evenly with vegetable cooking spray. Place the fillets, two at a time (sprayed side down), in the skillet, reduce the heat to medium, and cook 2 minutes. Turn the fillets over and cook until done, about 2 minutes more. Remove the cooked fillets, wipe the skillet clean, bring the heat back to 400°, and repeat the process with the remaining fillets.

Serves 4

Beekeeper's Cabbage

Ingredients:
1 Red cabbage (1-1/2 to 2 lbs)
1/2 oz Butter
1 Onion
2 tb Fruit vinegar (or more)-preferably raspberry
1 Parsnip
1 large Apple
Caraway seeds
1 tb Honey
1/4 pt Yoghurt or sour cream, opt.

Preparation:
Cut cabbage into quarters. Remove and discard the tough central stalk. Shred the cabbage and put it into a large mixing bowl. Peel and finely chop the onion and add it to the cabbage. Cut the parsnip and apple into small pieces, peeling them first if you wish, and add them to the bowl. Drizzle on the honey. Add a good seasoning of salt and pepper and scant 1/2 teaspoon caraway seeds. Sprinkle on the vinegar , use 3 tablespoons if the apple you are using is the dessert variety, just 2 tablespoons if it is a cooking apple. Mix everything together well using your hands -- a little messy, but spoons are not as effective -- then pile the mixture into a buttered casserole. Lay a sheet of thickly buttered greaseproof paper directly on top of the vegetables and cover the casserole with a well fitting lid to prevent drying out. Cook at 300 F (150 C) gas mark 2 for about 2-1/2 hours until the vegetables are beautifully tender, if possible stir the mixture once or twice as it cooks. Remove the greaseproof paper and check seasoning immediately before serving. Serve the vegetable mixture just as it is, or top at the last minute with 1/4 pint cold creamy yoghurt or soured cream into which you have stirred a few bruised and lightly crushed caraway seeds. Or hand round the bowl of flavored cream separately, so that those who want it can help themselves.

Serves: 6

Almost Eggless Egg Salad

Ingredients:
1 pound firm tofu, sliced and well drained
1 tablespoon minced onion
2 tablespoons minced celery
2 tablespoons mayonnaise
1 tablespoon sweet pickle relish
1 teaspoon distilled white vinegar
1 teaspoon prepared mustard
1 teaspoon white sugar
1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric
1/4 teaspoon dried dill weed
1 tablespoon dried parsley
salt to taste
ground black pepper to taste

Preparation:
1 In a small bowl, combine egoless mayonnaise, sweet pickle relish, vinegar, mustard, sugar, turmeric, dill, and parsley. Mix well, and reserve. 2 Place drained tofu in large bowl, and crumble with a fork. Stir in onion and celery. Mix in reserved mixture. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Chill for several hours to allow flavors to blend.



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Transportation and Living in Alaska
Posted by: Webmaster on Tuesday, April 06, 2010 - 02:45 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Transportation in Alaska

Alaska is a large state with some unusual transportation obstacles for both tourists and locals alike. Some parts of the state are on the "road system" and are accessed like towns in any other part of the US or Canada. Other towns and villages, especially in Southeast Alaska utilized the Alaska Marine Highway, a ferry system to get from town to town and to connect to the road systems in Alaska and Canada. While many of the rural communities in the interior of Alaska are only connected the outside world by bush plane, many also utilize the river systems of the Yukon and Kuskokwim to haul in freight as a water highway from town to town in small boats. In the winter ice roads will connect the larger communities such as barrow to the road systems, ports, and large commercial runways of the state. The challenges of the transportation in Alaska are just additional examples of the everyday tenacity of the people of Alaska.

Road System:

Alaska Marine Highway: The State of Alaska ferry system that servers southeast, south central and the Aleutian Islands. Ferries can carry cars, people, and cargo. Some have berths available. New fast ferry service added in Summer of 2005

Alaska Railroad: Railroad runs north from Seward, traveling through Anchorage, Talkeetna, and Denali National Park, on the way to Fairbanks. Very popular in summer and frequently requires early reservations for premium cars.

Alaska Airlines: Air carrier serving Alaska's interior and large communities. Most popular carrier among Alaskans.


Living in Alaska

Ever want to live in Alaska? Even if you are thinking about a summer job or maybe just coming up for a year or two -- you will find this section a great place to get started. Be warned -- many long time Alaskan residents originally came to the state with the idea of just spending a year or two.

There is no shortage of opinions on Alaska's economy, weather, job market, and all other aspects of life in the state. Many of which might be based on the first hand experience of the person telling the story, when they were living or working in Alaska -- ten or even twenty years past. What you might hear or read could be correct for the time of the visit, but some things change. So before you pack the bags and head north for that high paying welding job on the Alaska Pipeline or the abundant teaching jobs in the bush use our site and do a little research before you leap, so when you arrive you'll find what you seek.

Climate: Alaska is in a northern climate -- winters are long but fun -- summers are intense. Temperature varies dramatically across the state depending on the region. In the most general of terms Southeast Alaska (Juneau) experiences moderate winter temperatures with fewer sunny days. South-central (Anchorage) enjoys more snow than the Southeast and fewer cloudy days. The interior of the state can experience extreme cold for weeks at a time during the winter but people stay because of the countless clear days and nights throughout the year. Overall temperatures are warmer in the state as a result of climate change.

Cost of Living: Most goods and services cost more in Alaska than in the lower 48, however the disparity in prices is nothing like it was during the 70's. Overall prices are about 15% higher in the large towns. Prices in the bush can be exponentially higher due to shipping and reduced competition. Wages tend to be higher and for the most part offset the higher prices. The State of Alaska complied a great report on the cost of living in Alaska, in July of 2005

Housing: Rental housing for temporary and seasonal employees is often arranged or provided by the employer, especially in remote areas where housing options are extremely limited or non-existent. Some employers in the larger communities will not provide housing but will help to find suitable accommodations, which might vary from a room with a local to a hostel type bunk house.

Jobs in Alaska: The Alaskan economy continues to expand and add new jobs each and every year. Most job growth is in tourism, which tend to be seasonal. Recently, construction employment has shown sharp gains. With the exception of tourism jobs you will need to have an Alaskan address and phone number before you would be considered for a job. Exceptions to occur for highly desirable job candidates and for hard to fill positions. Read more on Alaska Jobs.

Quilting in Alaska: Quilting in Alaska is more than a pastime for many, many women in this state. Communities of any size have quilting as part of its make up. There are wonderful little quilting shops all over Alaska. These quilt shops offer camaraderie as well as a place to meet and socialize with other quilters. Fabrics of beautiful colors beckon quilters to come in and take home another fat quarter to add to their stash. Unique quilting patterns with themes found only in Alaska—Eskimo children in fur-trimmed parkas, Fireweed, Lupine, and Wild Iris, Salmon, the Northern Lights, and of course Moose, can all be found in these delightful little quilting shops.

Real Estate: Buying real estate in Alaska is no different than in other parts of the United States. Depending on the location of the purchase certain Alaska specific challenges may immerge during the purchase of sale of the property. As with most areas it is strongly advised to use a licensed realtor.

Schools in Alaska: Alaska has a wide variety of educational opportunities including 53 public school districts, 3 public universities, 2 private colleges, charter, and private schools. In addition to the traditional learning institutions the state is also home to several outdoor schools and programs ranging from fishing to mountaineering.

Volunteering: Opportunities for volunteers exist across a wide range of activities in addition to diversity in location and season. In addition to traditional volunteer options with social or educational groups, Alaska affords volunteers the chance to live and work in remote wilderness settings. Typically housing is provided as well as a small stipend to cover food and incidental expenses.



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RUBY ALASKA - A Gold Rush Town On The Yukon River
Posted by: Webmaster on Tuesday, April 06, 2010 - 02:43 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

RUBY ALASKA

A Gold Rush Town On The Yukon River

In 1906 gold was discovered on Ruby creek which brought more prospectors to the area. When word leaked out in 1910 about the discovery of gold on Long Creek, some 30 miles south of Ruby, it sparked a gold rush. New discoveries were then reported almost daily and continued through the following years. In 1912 gold was found on Greenstone and Poorman Creeks, in 1914 on Swift Creek and in 1920 on Moose Creek. Ruby became the supply center for mines in the area. Total gold production for the Ruby area through 1960 was about 390,000 fine ounces. Alaska’s largest gold nugget, 294 ounces, would be found near Ruby in 1998.

By summer of 1911 a tent city and a few wood frame buildings had sprung up. The city of Ruby was officially founded in January of 1912 and incorporated January 13, 1913. The name was actually a mistake as the early miners thought the red rocks (garnets) found in the streams were Rubies. In it's early days Ruby was sometimes called, "The Gem of the Yukon." Another nickname for Ruby was "The Hub of Alaska" for it's location in the near geographical center of the state.

At it's peak Ruby had a population close to 3,000 with as many as 5000 people in the area. Ruby had electric lights, telephone, stores, outfitters, two newspapers, a post office, two lumber mills, hotels, a movie house and a show hall. There was scheduled barge and riverboat service. For a few years Ruby rivaled Fairbanks as the center of civilization in Alaska.

Source: http://rubyalaska.info/  Use the link to view full article with pictures



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Where to Find Gold in Alaska
Posted by: Webmaster on Tuesday, April 06, 2010 - 02:42 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Where to Find Gold in Alaska

Bachelor Creek: Is 80 miles North of Fairbanks just past Montana Creek on the Steese Highway. There is a 4WD road that begins at the Dept of Transportation yard and goes around the fenced area. 4WD road not suitable for motor homes or most cars and you will go approximately 4 miles before reaching the mining area of the creek. No facilities available at the site. Area is open to gold panning, sluice boxes, rocker boxes, metal detectors and small suction dredges up to 6".

Caribou Creek in the Matanuska River Area (State Property): Access road located at mile 104 on the Glenn Highway. Turn onto 800ft long road at the 4'x5' billboard to parking area. Pans, sluices, detectors, and dredges. In 1991, the Alaska State legislature created the Caribou Creek Recreational Mining Area. Map and Information on Caribou Creek

Chugach (National Forest): Located Between Hope and Seward. Almost all active creeks, streams, and rivers are open to pans, sluices, & dredges (4"). The Alaska Mining Association has written a new guide for the area. Chugach Gold Mining Locations

Dalton Highway: Area on the "Haul Road" between Fairbanks/Prudhoe Bay. You can use: pan, pick, shovel, sluice box, rocker, metal detector. You can pan on any Federal stream segments along the Dalton highway south of Atigun Pass (mile 244) but no panning in the pipeline right-of-way (27 feet on either side of the pipeline) and no panning on Federal mining claims without the permission of the claimant. Dalton Highway Map

Eagle, AK (City and State Property): Along American Creek & S. of Eagle, Fortymile Creek along the Taylor highway, and the many tributaries feeding the drainage's. This is the original Jack London country and home to one of the original gold strikes in Alaska.

Hatcher Pass Recreational Mining Area Located approximately 15 miles northeast of Wasilla off of Palmer-Fishook Road, with recreational mining allowed along the Little Susitna River and tributaries and also with the Independence Mine State Park. Gold panning, shovels, picks, and small suction dredges. Check with State Ranger on permitting requirements for small dredges.

Nome Beach Gold Panning is permitted on the beach east of Nome between town and the Fort Davis Roadhouse (2 miles). There is gold in the sands and it's yours to keep. Tour companies will also take you to various panning locales along the beach.

Nome Creek, White Mountain National Recreational Area: Is the largest area of this kind in Alaska. Gold pans, metal detectors, sluice boxes and rocker boxes only. It has a rich history of gold production and is easily accessible even with the super size motor homes that tourists bring to Alaska. A huge road project completed in 1997 made access to this area from the Steese Highway very easy. Road begins at 57.3 mile Steese Highway. The road is approximately 5 miles long from the Steese Highway to Nome Creek mining area. Restrooms (outhouses) available and camping areas too. The Steese Highway is paved only to mile 44.

Pedro Dome: Is the oldest such area in the Fairbanks area. The area is the general location where Gold was first discovered in the Fairbanks area by Felix Pedro on July 22, 1902. This is the strike that put Fairbanks on the map. Small area, approximately 1 acre in size open to gold pans, metal detectors, sluice boxes and rocker boxes. There are no facilities such as restrooms, drinking water or food vendors in the area.

Peters Creek: State of Alaska managed recreational mining area, located at approximately mile 30 of the Petersville Road. Recreational gold panning, mineral prospecting, or mining using light portable field equipment are allowed without any permit. Also, you can obtain a permit from the DNR to use a small suction dredge. Primitive camping is available in the area. Map and information on Peters Creek Recreational Mining Area

Wrangell-St. Elias National Park & Preserve Mineral collection and gold panning are allowed within Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve. The use of metal detectors is illegal. Numerous historic mining locations on public land can be panned for gold and other minerals. In general the Dan Creek area, Nabsena, and McCarthy vicinity are the best areas to prospect.

And There are numerous other spots to pan for gold during a trip to Alaska. You might find a new spot or discover an old one just by panning for color when you stop along the highway. In addition to these public access areas for gold mining in Alaska, the state also offers a seemingly unlimited selection of commercial gold panning, sluicing, and mining operations, where a tourist can learn how to pan for gold. Many local visitor offices will be able to give specific advice on their local area. Some spots are better than other. We will continue to add to this list of "Where to pan for gold in Alaska". Good Luck.



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Alaska - Gold Rush History of Fairbanks
Posted by: Webmaster on Tuesday, April 06, 2010 - 02:41 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Alaska

Gold Rush History of Fairbanks

Gold fever struck Fairbanks and the areas surrounding this Interior Alaska city in 1902, and many people who sought the elusive gold nuggets never recovered. In Fairbanks, there is a replica Gold Rush street at Alaska land, including original pioneer log cabins and a saloon offering a Gold Rush revue

The Alaskaland Pioneer Museum chronicles the lives of those who made their fortunes in the Interior (after the stampede) and has an exhibit of Rusty Hurlein's paintings of the era. Alaskaland also has a "mining valley" display, where the Alaska Salmon Bake is located.

Fairbanks (actually Fox, a nearby community) boasts the only gold dredge open for public visit, Gold Dredge 8. Numerous museums are available, including the University of Alaska Museum.

Gold was not discovered in Fairbanks until 1902. The story of Fairbanks gold reminds one of Robert Service's famous poem about the "strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold."


Alaska GOLD Forum

http://bb.bbboy.net/alaskagoldforum



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SEARCHING FOR DRAGOON ARTIFACTS By Dean Adams
Posted by: Webmaster on Tuesday, April 06, 2010 - 02:35 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

The Western Treasure Hunter

SEARCHING FOR DRAGOON ARTIFACTS By Dean Adams

A Dragoon button was a Find of the Month winner at a recent club meeting. This rekindled my interest in the subject. I have studied the Dragoons and looked for their artifacts several places and for several years.

The finding of a Dragoon “D” button in our Denver area is quite rare. In fact this find is the second that I can remember ever being found by a club member. A friend found a coat “D” button a few years ago but unfortunately a cleaning error caused it to not reach the finds table.

First I’ll give you some history of the Dragoons then I’ll tell you my treasure hunting sob story.

In June of 1832 Congress authorized the formation of the Mounted Rangers for the purpose of guarding the Western frontier with a more mobile type of soldier. In 1833 Congress established the United States Regiment of Dragoons. This group remained active until 1855 when both the Mounted Rangers and Dragoons became part of the new US Calvary.

The Dragoons became somewhat famous during this period because of their accomplishments as well as their controversies. The massive Colt model 1848 .44 Caliber 6 shot revolver was introduced to rectify a number of defects found in the even larger Colt Walker revolver. This was named the Colt Dragoon, named after the Dragoons.

They were quite a flamboyant group. Their uniforms were gaudy and changed frequently and in each company all rode the same color horse.

When first organized they were stationed in the western Missouri – eastern Kansas area. Fort Scott Kansas was one of the first forts in this area and was used as a supply post for Fort Leavenworth Kansas. Fort Leavenworth was to become the main headquarters and supply post for later western development and Army activities including the Indian wars.

The Dragoon’s expedition in 1835 was down the South Platt River, through what was to become Denver, down to Bent’s Fort and back to Fort Leavenworth. An expedition came through the Denver area again, down from Wyoming in the 1840s. (So why hasn’t more “D” buttons been found here?)

In March of 1846 the Mexican war began and Colonel Kearney, the commander of the Dragoons, was promoted to Brigadier General.

Their first mission was to march to Fort Bent then south to seize Santa Fe. This as done without incident. They then marched west to invade California. Fortunately they met Kit Carson who they persuaded to guide them west toward their goal of San Diego. This would have taken them through the Dragoon Mountains in southeastern Arizona.

It is not known if the Dragoon Mountains were named for this occasion or when a regiment surveyed this area for the early route of the Overland Stagecoach Line. This route ran from St. Louis to San Francisco. When the Apache Wars broke out after the Civil War, Overland moved the route north, roughly along the California and Oregon trails.

Last winter a friend and I hunted in the Dragoon Mountains as well as at a stage swing station (changing horses only) in the Sulphur Springs Valley east of the Dragoons. This was east of Tombstone and was also the site of an Apache reservation. Strangely enough, the only significant artifact found on this hunt was a Civil War vintage Union Army eagle button.

The many bullets and cartridge cases we found consisted of just about every variety used throughout the history of the area. All in all we had three pounds of history. If it could only talk, what a story it would tell.

But I found no ”D “ button. From the various forums on the Internet I learned that others had hunted this area and found “D” buttons. (Woe is me).

In 2002 I had the opportunity of hunting in western Missouri with friends I had met through an Internet Forum. This was near the Kansas border and the town of Fort Scott Kansas.

All the sites we hunted had been found by research conducted by my friend and had been hunted many times before. This didn’t preclude us from finding artifacts, however. Our hunts were at the site of an early frontier Army outpost, possibly occupied before the establishment of Fort Scott.

This site, now in the middle of a very large field, must have been a small outpost because most everything found there was within a thirty or forty foot diameter circle. Our finds verified that this was a pre-civil war or early frontier site. Earlier finds in this small area by my friends consisted of about a dozen Army buttons, mostly Dragoon “D” buttons.

Buttons were still to be found in this small circle. My friend found a Dragoon “D” two-piece brass cuff button, circa 1850. My best find was a rare Infantry “I” two-piece silver plated cuff button, circa 1840. The closest I came to a “D” button was the back half of a possible two-piece Dragoon coat button. (Woe is me).

Where will my next quest for the illusive “D” button take me?

Sources:

US Dragoons 1833-1855

By John Langellier and Bill Young husband

The Life of the Dragoon Enlisted Men

By J. Patrick Hughes, Ph.D.



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Which is Better V-3 or E-Trac By Jason Sevene
Posted by: Webmaster on Tuesday, April 06, 2010 - 02:33 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Which is Better V-3 or E-Trac

By Jason Sevene

I will respond to this and hopefully will not sound too bias towards the E-Trac.....

From what I’ve read,, the V-3 is a fantastic instrument. I used one once for a short time at a local hunt and was impressed with what I saw ,but I will admit that my experience with this machine is obviously limited. The cordless headphone setup is definitely an outstanding, and very usable option. It also seems to be a very well balanced machine, in my opinion. I’m not sure all of the different colors on the monitor are all that necessary. Any serious metal detectorist will not go wrong by purchasing one and any diehard Whites fan with one would be a force to recon with on the detecting field. Downright deadly in the right hands!
With that said, I will speak a bit on the E-Trac and it's performance. Minelab is a newcomer to the detecting market and has since hit the hobby by storm and the storm has turned into a hurricane in short order! Their latest and greatest general purpose machine is the legendary E-Trac. This machine has an incredible following and is based on their fantastic Explorer series, but is NOT an updated Explorer. Learning to use this machine for the inexperienced is like picking up a guitar for the first time. Don’t be intimidated however, as it will soon show it's colors in short order. You do your part and the E-Trac will do it's part. It is similar to learning a foreign language. The different tones will blow your mind once learned. Will it go deep? You bet it will, but depth is not everything right? How about going deep and picking out that Seated half dime in ferrous trash that has been sitting there since 1840 when the farmer lost it feeding his oxen? YES IT WILL!!!!!. It's discrimination is the best that I’ve ever used. The quick mask option is a superb feature that basically lets you hunt in ''all metal'', yet allows a bit of discrimination based on user preferences. You also have many pre set programs to choose from and the USB port on the machine allows you to download other users programs from Minelab and other private users. You decide what you want to use and for what situation. Since owning my E-Trac, my finds have literally doubled, and at tough sites as well. I’m not trying to boast, but I have made some incredible finds to back up this statement.

This machine, combined with my Sunray X-1 inline probe, is the ultimate in serious equipment. The best I’ve ever used and will be my mainstay machine for years or until Minelab comes out with something better. This of course is just my opinion, but don't take my word for it....Try the both of them out and You be the judge. George Streeter has the both of them on his wall so go down and check them out.



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Time To Cut The Cord by Michael J. Beach
Posted by: Webmaster on Tuesday, April 06, 2010 - 02:31 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Time To Cut The Cord

Wireless Stereo Headphones For metal detectors!

Michael J. Beach “Lifesupsanddowns”


I just recently tried out a pair of Radio Shack wireless headphones, from Streeter’s Treasure Hunting Supply. They come W/ Wireless Headphones, 1-to- 2 Charging Hub, Universal Dongle, AC adapter, and a User Guide. They both come with a built-in NiMH rechargeable battery. Which will last you about 7 hours of time to go with Detecting.

On January 10, 2010 (Sunday) I took a trip to Hampton Beach, with a few friends just to see what we might come up with, after the nor eastern storm we had about a week ago. I found this a good time to check out the wireless headphones.. It was the coldest weather, I ever hunted in ( 8 Degrees )

I first started out with my Garrett GTI 2500 Once a geared up for the cold weather at hand, I was off to detecting the beach. I found out the headphones didn’t cover my whole ears & I had to use a ski hat to keep my head and ears warm… but I found out that the headphones were pinching my ears due to the hat… Later in the day I took off my hat and was just using a pull -over hood. ^& it was fine after that, no more pinching of the ears I was good to go.

I found the Headphones had nice sounds and I was hearing all of the hits nice and clear. The one thing I really like the best of this set-up is, “The wireless part” ( no cord ). If you wear glasses or sun glasses. When you have to set down your machine to start digging, many times the cord from your headphones pulls your glasses from your head, and you find yourself putting them back in place just to see again.

Later in the day I tried out the wire less Headphones with my wife’s Minelab X-Terra 705. I found out they work just as nice with the X-Terra 705 as of my Garrett GTI 2500. I was very pleased with the performance, of the Wireless headphones. I believe that I will be using them most of the time.. And use my regular headset which are “Koss” for my back-up headphones. I was at the beach from 9am to 4:30pm. When we all packed in for the day, the rechargeable batteries were still going strong.

Oh almost forgot, it comes with an 1/8” jack & I had to go buy a 1/8” to ¼” 90 deg adapter which was a few bucks.

In using the wireless headphones, it was a good time with good friends. I just would like to say Thank You to Bow and Pat, for the company, and having the passion of this wonderful hobby.

Special Thank You out to George Streeter “ Sea Hunter” of Streeter Electronics 307 Main St. Marlborough, NH 03431 (603)-876-4443) for letting me test and then keep these new cordless headphones.



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Spectra V-3 Evaluation By Lance Comfort
Posted by: Webmaster on Tuesday, April 06, 2010 - 02:29 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Spectra V-3 Evaluation

By Lance Comfort

I’ve always promised myself that I wouldn’t buy a brand new model detector until it had been on the market for a while and they had worked all the kinks out; that is until the Whites Spectra V3 came out.

Half out of an intense interest of all of the new features and half feeling sorry for myself for some health issues I decided that I was going to break my long standing pledge, and investigate this exciting new machine.

My brother Rick and I had just completed our week long fall “Brothers and Others” hunt, and I was taking him to Manchester Airport for his return trip to California. We had a few extra hours to kill and so I suggested that on the way down to the airport we stop by Streeter Electronics and check out the new machine. Although I had the money in my metal detecting fund to purchase the machine, I was still not sure I was going to get it that day.

I had called George before we left Vermont to make sure that he had a V3 available. I didn’t want to get all excited about a purchase, only to find there were none to look at. He assured me that he had a machine that I could try out, but that there was someone who was interested in it. He could get another one out to me by the next day should the person decide on it, however that would not be until later in the day, so I would be able to take a look at the Spectra and try it out in any case.

George greeted us at the door when we arrived and although we had not met before, it was if we had been friends for a long time. It’s a nice feeling when you meet people like that, and you make an instant connection.

As it turned out that other individual had called back and wanted a different machine, so the one at the store was available. I put on the very comfortable head phones and turned the Spectra on and new instantly that I wanted this machine, and not later, but right now.

I have always owned only Whites detectors, starting with a Classic ID my wife bought me for my birthday long ago. I then purchased a used and then later, new XLT, and have had and used predominantly my DFX for the past three years.

I have always felt that the DFX was the Cadillac of detectors. Well, if the DFX is a Cadillac then the Spectra V3 is like a Ferrari. The first thing that you’ll notice is how light and tight the machine feels. It is very well balanced and felt like a comfortable glove on my hand. As I mentioned earlier, the cordless headphones are among the most comfortable I have ever used, but the biggest surprise came when I turned on the Spectra and heard the sound of the machine. The sounds and tones were the most comfortable I’ve ever heard. I’m sensitive to loud and raspy sounds and have always had to maintain a low threshold and volume when detecting. Listening to the V3 was a pleasure. I am not sure how to explain it, other than you have to hear it to understand what I am saying.

Needless to say I purchased the Spectra V3 immediately along with the cordless headphones and a new Sun Ray DX-1 pin pointer to go with it.

We said our goodbyes and I brought Rick to the airport for his return flight to California. He made me promise to let him know how I like the “new” machine.

I was fortunate enough to have the next day off, and knew that I would be out in some of my favorite spots seeing what the Spectra could do. I placed the Nickel Metal Hydride battery in its charger and curled up in bed with my new owner’s manual. After just a little reading I knew that there was going to be a learning curve with this detector, unlike what I had previously experienced. Going from the XLT to the DFX was simple; this was going to take longer. It’s important to recognize this before you take the V3 out for the first time. There’s a lot to learn with new sounds and new exciting tools to help with your detecting.

If you have used headphones all along you’re going to love these cordless ones. I could detect no delay, despite what I have heard from others. The sounds are crisp, and as I said before, they are very comfortable and eliminate all outside sounds. The only draw-back I can see is they use up the two double AA batteries rather quickly, so always keep a spare set of two on you. There is no warning other than they turn off. You can turn them back on again for a few seconds, but they will keep going off. The nice feature is they automatically turn off when you turn your detector off.

The Spectra also uses batteries faster than the DFX, but the rechargeable will last you for a nice long hunt. (I still always carry a spare with me though).

The menu is easy to use and much quicker to get around than earlier Whites detectors. A nice feature is that your settings are all saved when you take out your battery and put a fresh set in. No more having to input your program again. Just continue detecting.

With three frequencies as compared with one on the XLT and two on the DFX, the Spectra is better able to differentiate between Nickel/Gold, Brass/Lead, and Copper/Silver than other Whites detectors. Three easy to use screens make determining your target easier too. Trigger centered is the active search screen. A nice new feature here is the “on-the-fly” depth indication along with target signatures on each of the three frequencies.

Once you have found a potential target, squeeze the trigger and you enter the Active Pinpoint Screen. The frequency with the longest bar indicates the probable metal you have found and the potential depth is indicated in large numbers

Push the trigger forward and you enter the Active Analyze Screen. This to me is one of the most exciting of the new features on the Spectra. This graph gives you a wealth of information and will take you the most time to learn, but will save you from digging so many of those deep iron targets that I have always hated. If any one of the line graphs is not smooth, you most likely have deep iron. What a time saver. (If you’re like me you will still dig them for a while just to make sure. The Spectra was dead on each time.)

There are many more new and exciting features that are too numerous to mention here. My suggestion is to get one of your own and see what you think. I believe you’ll be most happy with it.

You can put lots of bells and whistles on any machine, and make it light up in multi colors with graphs and other features, but when it comes right down to it, how it works is all that counts.

When I got my Spectra it was just about the end of our season here in Vermont. Most of my fields and cellar holes had been gone over for the year and I didn’t have any new spots to detect, so I went back to several fields I had detected many times before.

After getting used to the machine and what it was telling me, I started to find a number of targets in areas that had been detected many times before. Over the next month I found many small and deep targets in fields where I did not expect much would be found. Among the finds are two half Reales, a half cent and many small buttons, all which were over six inches in depth. I was able to get permission to detect one new field before the snow arrived. The Spectra V3 excelled there too, with two large coppers, several silver dimes, a half reale and a beautiful GAR Belt Buckle, to name just a few of the finds.

Does it work well? You bet!!!



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Nights of Gold
Posted by: Webmaster on Friday, February 12, 2010 - 05:44 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Nights of Gold

By Chris Valerio 

Time just seems to fly by these days and before I knew it, our next treasure hunting adventure and destination to the Isle of St Thomas, US Virgin Islands, had quickly arrived. Actually, I had not even fully unpacked from my last treasure hunt with George Streeter and it was already time to repack again! This adventure would be my first ever trip to St Thomas. I’m somewhat dramatic here because since I was a kid, I was interested in going to the Virgin Islands. I envisioned blue-green waters, palm-lined white sand beaches and lots of sun! When I was in High School my friend Paul Wilson packed his bags and left for St Thomas to make his fortune in the ice business. I always marveled at his bold and daring move at such a young age! Paul was mostly interested in making money, girls at the beach and drinking along with whatnot. The last I ever heard from Paul, many years ago, was that there were plenty of drinking opportunities and girls around the Island! I never heard from Paul again and I surmise that he either became a multi millionaire or fish food at the bottom of the sea! I suspect the latter. God Bless you Paul, wherever you are! But it really was not Paul who got me interested in the Virgin Islands. Long before meeting Paul, my father Joe is to blame for that! My dad had a dream back around 1965 to live on and charter a sailboat there. That dream was never manifested, but always seemed very exciting to me as a boy. Often I envisioned such a lifestyle shipboard on the sea and what one might expect the Virgin Islands to be like. A tropical Paradise! Yet as the years passed I never made it to St Thomas and only photos of the Island spoke their thousand words of someday. Then suddenly someday came, when George Streeter invited me and 6 others on a shallow water treasure hunting adventure for gold in the warm waters of St Thomas! That’s right folks, this was a group of 8! George, myself, Don Foster of NH, Peter Lopipero of NY, Charles Anderson, Paul and Pat Rodinsky and Mr. Goldmaster- all 4 from Florida. Mr. Goldmaster prefers to remain anonymous. Not only was this a big group, but was also one of those very rare times in the history of metal detecting that George Streeter invited a non-detecting observer along! In this case Pat, Paul’s wife. Pat was along for the ride and turned out to be a welcome addition to our group! Even though Pat did not detect with us, she helped to make our vacation easier and fun. As a gourmet cook Pat did some wonderful cooking while we were out looking for treasure. She also cleaned up after us and took care of laundry and other related chores. Pat is an attractive lady with a marvelous sense of humor and warm heart. She was always wishing us good luck. Her husband Paul is a very lucky man! Which brings to mind… having more women along on these treasure hunting vacations might be a fun idea? I would certainly enjoy the company of metal detecting ladies. Surely there must be some shallow water lady treasure hunters wanting to partake in such adventures? Any ladies out there interested in finding gold in the Caribbean Sea should contact George Streeter right away.

George rented a very nice Villa, Blue Horizons for our stay, January 31st through February 8th. This Villa sits on a mountain top overlooking the cruise ship docks below, with a million dollar view! We enjoyed the private swimming pool, a large living room, huge Master bedroom, washer/dryer and long outside view deck with BBQ, hammock, roomy kitchen and dining area along with beds for all. Except George did volunteer to sleep on the white couch. This was our home away from home and served us very well. We also rented 2 cars from Budget to transport us from beach to beach. I got lucky and got to drive a brand new Jeep Commander with a neck-snapping Hemi! Varoom! That power came in handy as most of the roads in St Thomas are very windy with lots of ups and downs and sudden traffic from every direction. Most there drove fast and it was like being in a mountain road rally! One could always smell our hot transmission and brakes! I normally do not drive like that, but that’s how it’s done in St Thomas. Additionally on the left or wrong side of the road! Which reminds me, a good business to start in St Thomas would be an automotive brake shop! Peter drove the other rental car, a Ford Focus with George as our navigator in the front passenger seat. I had it easy. All I had to do was follow them and keep the hemi on the road. George and Peter did a wonderful job, although we did make quite a few scary u-turns! Despite the wild mountain driving and every road looking nearly identical to the other, we got around. Really, I’m not exaggerating. Driving in St Thomas is almost like being on a roller coaster ride! On these trips and after driving in foreign lands, I always feel a small sense of relief when the trip is over and the driving is done without incident. Because driving is different in the Islands, the chances of an accident rise sharply. I do not want to scare anyone from driving in the Caribbean, but know that for the most part Caribbean driving is at a much faster pace than here in the States! Almost like a video game. Being an extra careful driver might not be enough. Driving too slow or cautiously could actually cause an accident! When driving in the Caribbean I often imagine some American police officer (traffic cop) riding with me in the car. He/She would be blown away by what they see and would not have enough tickets in a full case of ticket books, to write up all the moving violations in just one day! Often motorcycles drive right up the middle of the road at Mach 1 with just inches to spare between cars, nearly everybody speeds and tailgates, others park anywhere including on sidewalks and the local cops seem to look the other way. On top of this are all sorts of distractions such a cows, dogs, iguanas and chickens, all trying to cross the road to get to the other side without warning! While Island drivers have more freedom to drive as they please than here in the States, from what I understand all of that fun comes to an abrupt end, when one causes an accident. I guess that can ruin the entire day! So having full auto insurance when driving in the Caribbean is a very smart thing. In St Thomas my personal auto insurance fully covered us, just as if I were driving at home. So we saved some money by not having to buy extra rental car company insurance. But if your insurance company does not cover you in the Caribbean, then one must purchase insurance from the rental company for sure. A very smart thing to do! But actually I’m more nervous about flying on these vacations than driving. Although I did hear George say something about closing his eyes often as a passenger!

stthomasgoldfinds.JPG

Click to view more St Thomas photos

On this trip we all got along very well and shared responsibilities. That makes for a fun trip. Every morning Don or Mr. Goldmaster made a great cup of coffee. All I had to do was get up and pour! Charlie made pancakes, French toast, eggs and bacon for breakfasts. We ate our lunches out at Mickey-D’s, KFC or where the locals eat whenever possible. Charlie and Pat prepared simple dinners for us at the Villa. So we all ate well. Partly because of good planning, but also going major food shopping twice. My favorite dinner was the barbequed chicken legs prepared by Charlie and Pat, cooked just right! I was on a sea food diet. Whenever I saw food I ate it!

Our treasure hunting days were very long. We got up early and hit as many beaches as we could. Often driving to and finding a particular beach took up quite a bit of our daylight. Though by the end of this trip we had this Island down pat. Each night we returned to the Villa tired and eagerly soaked in the pool. But for me this was a special trip because on 3 occasions we went night treasure hunting! I have never hunted at night and this was an experience to remember and I now favor night hunting. There was one particular beach where for some reason metal detecting was not allowed. This is a big beach where many tourists like to deposit their gold in the sea for us to find. We tried detecting this beach during the day, but were escorted out promptly. But where there is a will there is a way and we found it. A friendly life guard suggested  we  return after 6:pm when all the staff went home. But this meant hunting at sunset and eventually in total darkness. We were prepared for exactly that and had all brought along small headlamps. So for 3 nights in a row we metal detected at night for several hours. This was a very exciting thing to do. We were like pirates in the night plundering an off limits beach and were sort of getting away with something! Hunting for gold and treasure at night reminded me of night crabbing here in Washington State for delicious Dungeness crab. One goes out at low tide and at night with a propane lantern and rake in search of crab. Night hunting in St Thomas brought back many good crabbing memories. The night air was still and crisp, the sea calm along with the smells of the ocean and saltwater, with the heavens above filled to the brim with dancing stars! There I was surrounded by darkness, chest deep in water and metal detecting for gold. Lights from a few nearby lights and anchored yachts reflected over the waters surface. Which each target dug I turned on my headlamp to discover what I had found in my scoop. Off in the distance were the other glowing headlamps of my treasure hunting partners. Every time a light went on, I knew that potentially someone had found treasure! Each night we found gold there and on the second night I found a ladies solitaire engagement style diamond ring! The main stone is at least a ¾ carret diamond with 5 smaller diamonds on each side, all set in 18 KT white gold and platinum! I could not believe my eyes when I saw that beauty sparkling in my scoop by headlamp light. Instantly I just knew the diamonds were real, as was later confirmed by an electronic diamond tester. I will never forget the moment and place of that find. It’s etched in my mind and I will savor this memory for years to come. It was as though that diamond ring was a falling star, somehow caught that night in my scoop. This is the stuff dreams are made of! Sadly I can just imagine the hearbreak and sense of loss felt by someone. Unfortunately there are no personal markings in this ring and if I could return this ring to a rightful owner, I would without hesitation! It is a very beautiful ring and the center diamond looks very white and nearly flawless! This ring is one of my best jewelry finds to date. I especially like that it was found at night. I find night hunting to be somewhat romantic and would call night hunting Midnight Blue- a favorite color of mine. However night hunting was not all fun and games. Night hunting requires some courage while submerged chest deep in dark waters. One never knows what might like to snack on you! As a matter of fact in 1963 and at the same beach we were at, a swimmer was killed by a 10’ Caribbean shark! While sharks feeding at night had crossed my mind, I was striken with a serious case of gold fever! And in this particular case I wanted the gold more than was scarred of Jaws! Yet to be honest there were a few times where I nearly jumped out of my swim suit. The bottom was a combination of sand and mud and with each dig of the scoop sediment billowed up like a cloud in the water. A couple of times I mistook that sediment cloud for something on the attack! Sometimes it was best just to keep the headlamp turned off. Fortunately none of us were eaten alive and we found some nice treasure while night hunting. I have always enjoyed seeing scooped gold glistening in the sunlight, but perhaps now prefer scooping gold in the dark? It’s just so very exciting! I will definitely try night hunt again.

While as a group in St Thomas we did not find as much gold as on some other islands and past trips, there was a potential to find better quality pieces, such as my diamond ring and the heavy platinum band found by George. On this trip our group found more than 40 pieces at over 200 grams! Mr. Goldmaster found the most, 12 pieces. I found 9 pieces of gold, George 8, Don 5, Peter and Paul 4 each and Charlie one beautiful wedding band! By weight George found the most, over 74 grams including the heavy platinum band. So I declare George the gold champ on this trip! Mr. Goldmaster came in a very close second at 67.5 grams and I third with 46 grams. Yet I feel my diamond ring was the best find of the trip, followed by George’s platinum ring. In all this was a very fun trip. I really enjoyed the fellowship of my treasure hunting companions. Together as a group we are a dream team, which helps to make such treasure hunting vacations possible, affordable and safe. And with the price of gold hovering around $1,100.00 an ounce, very $ green too!

There really is lots of gold to be found in the sea! If you would like to try Caribbean shallow water treasure hunting, give George Streeter of Streeter Electronics a call. (603-876-4443 www.streeter.org email  gstreeter@ne.rr.com ) George has great deals on all sorts of metal detectors and treasure hunting tools. George is a very giving man and will always help you discover your treasures. Happy hunting to all and may the gold be with you!



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Fish Pole Beach
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, February 11, 2010 - 06:26 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

Fish Pole Beach

By Chris Valerio 

This past November 10th thru the 18th, George Streeter invited me and 5 other treasure hunters, to partake in what turned out to be another successful Caribbean treasure hunting vacation, on the beautiful island of Guadeloupe. In Guadeloupe French is spoken there and Euros are the official currency. George Streeter has been to Guadeloupe many times now and with each visit, Guadeloupe still gives up some of her gold from the sea. I was one of the lucky 7 to go and partake in this golden treasure adventure. Yes there were 7 of us on this treasure hunt, and I was a bit concerned how that would work out. Much to my surprise and despite 2 being company and 3 a crowd, 7 worked out great! The best part, we all found gold and had a wonderful time in Paradise! Besides myself and George Streeter, Tom Blondell of Rochester, MN, Rich LaMothe of Fort Meyers FL, Bryan Llewellyn of Wales, UK, Don Foster of Claremont, NH and Mr. Jim Corbett of Princeton, NJ rounded up The Golden 7. And 7 turned out to be a lucky number! Everything about this trip just seemed to fall into place and work out right. This vacation was a piece of cake! 6 of us arrived and departed Guadeloupe at the same time! Only Bryan coming from the UK arrived early and departed later than the rest of us. This worked out pretty good, as within minutes after landing in Guadeloupe, we were shuttled to our bungalows by the sea, as a group. George smartly hired Tropical Transport to do the driving. All we had to do was get in Tropical’s large van and enjoy the ride. Bryan was already at the bungalows and was able to get a ride from fellow travelers he met on his flight. That was very nice. George rented 3 bungalows for us and that worked out well. We arrived pretty late and found comfortable beds and a rental van waiting for us. We put together our detectors and went straight to bed, eager for tomorrow to come.

The place we stay at is located in the town of St. Anne and only a 2 minute walk from a most beautiful palm tree lined beach . There is also a bakery, restaurant, deli, store, bank, payphones and more just round the corner. A sweet set-up for sure! The next morning found us all detecting for gold in the sea, practically right out our front doors! Soon we started striking gold and my first find was an 18 K gold chain with gold cross-style pendant! George and most in our group also struck gold on the very fist day! I tell you it simply does not get any better than this! Sun, sand, sea and gold! So we hunted this particular beach for the rest of the day. As if this were not enough, we had a rental van waiting to take us to several other beaches on the Island known to produce gold! George rented a 9 passenger full size Fiat van for us from National, through our hotel. So we didn’t have to pick the rental van up. It was delivered to out bungalows for us! After signing on the dotted line and with key in hand, we had our wheels and I was officially the designated driver.

That evening around 7 PM and every night thereafter around the same time, we ate delicious dinners at Le Lucellous, the open-air restaurant just 100 yards walking distance from our place. They serve affordable French-Creole dishes ranging from pasta to fish, to ribs and steak, chicken and lobster. It was simply too covenant and good not to eat there every night. Besides the good food we shared stories of the day along with other fine yarns and tales of past treasure hunting adventures. Our dinners also concluded our successful days hunting for treasure and provided a wonderful sense of camaraderie, laughter and friendship! We also have a favorite waitress there. Here name is Betty and she speaks some English. Betty is a beautiful, funny young French lady with a wonderful smile and helps make sure that our supper gets done right! On most of our trips to Guadeloupe Betty has been at the restaurant and helps makes our visit more enjoyable. I would also like to mention another restaurant we tried for lunch while on the road. Aux Artistes Restaurant in Bas-du-Fort. This is a small funky place with lots of artwork on the walls. (Tel: 0590 907 311- located on Route de Bas-du-Fort) Dany the owner, another beautiful and blond French lady, was happy to serve us her lunch specialty, smoked chicken with fries, followed by a delicious apple crumb cake desert with coffee. This is a fun place to eat lunch and as with Betty, I was taken with Dany’s good looks and first class personality! So when in Bas-du-Fort, do visit Dany at Aux Artistes. Dany does speak English too.

Our delightful setting of lodging, beach with gold and restaurant, would be plenty to satisfy any traveling treasure hunter. One could spend the entire week or 2 there hunting for gold, eating and sleeping and never get into a car! But George knows where there are some other very good and productive beaches around the Island. It took many visits to Guadeloupe to discover these golden beaches and several are off the beaten path. They all have names, but we have our own names for some of them, as French names can be difficult to pronounce if one does not speak the language! Our names are much easier and have meanings to us. Names such as The Little Pools, The Big Pools, Don’s Honey Hole and now one called Fish Pole Beach. Each of these beaches always produce gold finds. Why at Don’s Honey Hole I found 13 pieces of gold in a small area! That is why we rent a van to get around the Island to detect our favorite beaches. When you go with George Streeter to detect an island for gold, you become privy to valuable information. Such as where the best beaches are. This alone is worth thousands of dollars! So it is an honor to accompany George on these trips!

For the most part we stuck together as a group. When 6 or 7 of us went into the water, there were Excalibur detectors everywhere! Excalibur's are our detector of choice and simply find the most gold for us. If you want to find lots of gold on land and in the sea, give George Streeter owner of Streeter Electronics a call for great metal detector deals. George will steer you in the right direction! Gold is where you find it and while there are no guarantees gold will be found, when armed with a Minelab Excalibur metal detector your odds for gold go way up! Excalibur's are almost like gold magnets. Believe me, I have tried most underwater machines and Excalibur's find the most gold, silver and platinum in the sea. That is why all of us use Excalibur's. If there were a better machine, we would use it and George would sell it!

So just how good did we do with our Excalibur's on this treasure search? Well, how about a group total of 121 pieces of gold jewelry, including rings, bracelets, earrings, chains and pendants! 3 of my rings had small diamonds in them and most of the gold found in Guadeloupe is 18 K, as that is what the locals prefer! On top of the gold finds we found many, pieces of silver and Euro coins. While one might not be able to survive on bread alone, one sure could on found Euro coins in the sea! We found many 1 and 2 Euro coins and while I normally do not dig coin signals while hunting for gold jewelry, I do when it comes to Euros. Each Euro found is worth about $1.50 US and on this trip finding 2 Euro coins was rather common. That’s like scooping $3.00 for each 2 Euro coin found! These found Euro coins add up quickly and easily paid for all my gourmet food on this adventure!

Rich turned out to be the Gold King on this trip finding 32 pieces. George found 20 pieces of gold and I 29 total. Bryan who is somewhat new to shallow water detecting found 3 pieces of gold, Jim 10 pieces, Don 13 and Tom 14 pieces of gold! My gold found weighs over 2 ounces! Tom’s pieces were larger pieces and Rich may have found a 22 K gold chain and ring! Remarkably Jim found a 1700’s silver Spanish 4 Reale coin in beautiful condition! What a great find Jim! Now that’s real treasure and when I go back to Guadeloupe, I know exactly where I am going to detect for more Reales! There is lots more treasure to be found in Guadeloupe!

A certain beach we always hit has a new name now, Fish Pole Beach. Why, it’s a whale of a tale! One that I simply would not believe if I had not seen with my own eyes! I can only give testimony as to what I saw. And as unbelievable as this will sound, it really did happen. Did you know George Streeter is a fisherman? I did not know that until now. George did not tell me this, he showed me first hand how fishing is done! Picture this. The 7 of us are detecting in blue green water waist deep on a beautiful beach where only the locals swim to lose their gold jewelry. That is why we are there, to find the lost gold. We are not supposed to be relaxing on the beach sipping a drink, frolicking in the water or sightseeing, as we are there to detect for gold. As a matter of fact George frowns when we stray from treasure hunting! Yet we caught the Master himself with his pants down, so to speak, taking a break from detecting! At first when I saw George taking a break from detecting I thought to myself, Ah Ha! Here I was hard at work stricken with Gold fever and looking for gold, and there was George Streeter recreating! Unbelievably as I’m detecting in the sea for gold, I just happen to look up to see George pursuing apparently his other pastime, fishing! That’s right folks, George was standing in waist deep water with a fishing pole in hand and fishing! What a nerve having fun like that while the rest of us are busy looking for gold! Not only this but George was actually playing a fish! I watched him reel in a 20 plus inch Bonefish! Heck it might have been a 5’ Tarpon! From what I could see the fish put up quite a fight, but by the time I reached George, he landed his prize! What was George trying to pull on us? Having fun like that! To keep an amazing story short, George spotted the fishing pole underwater by mask and snorkel. Then naturally being the treasure hunter that he is, George grabbed his prize, only to discover there was a hooked fish at the other end of the line! So George reeled him in, in a rather sporting fashion I might add! Finding a fishing pole underwater is one thing, but what are the odds of finding one with a fish attached? But that is exactly what George did, and why we now and forever will refer to that beach as Fish Pole beach! Strange but true story! George said that he would not do it again and will concentrate more on finding gold next time. We forgive him this time! For more specific details in George’s Guadeloupe fishing techniques please ask Streeter himself!

Besides George distracting us with his fishing activities, there are many other distractions on the Guadeloupe beaches in the form of, well eye candy! Put your children to bed now! Many of the French ladies for some reason do not like wearing one half of their bathing suits. The upper half that is! Now they might be too hot or something? Perhaps they desire an even tan? But a woman going topless in Guadeloupe is as normal as me having my morning coffee! Nobody there thinks anything of it. But we treasure hunters find the local culture rather interesting. It’s almost like reading a National Geographic magazine! Just like I did when in 4th grade! Well, with that said and out of the way it is now time to move on here.

Our diesel Fiat van was rather fuel efficient and I wish I could buy one here in the States. It lad lots of room, plenty of power and handled rather well. Build quality seemed up to snuff too! It is always nice to drive such a quality vehicle on these treasure hunting trips. If anyone wants to see what our van looked like, just Goggle “Fiat Scud Van”. We drove all over the Island for less than $60 in fuel! That was truly amazing! Good choice George!

Don and I shared a bungalow and I like Don. Don has a great memory and helps remind me where he puts the room keys often. Don makes me laugh and I admire his love of cats. At the bungalows there are several cats that come to visit. The are starving for attention, which Don is more than happy to give. Don also brings the cats leftovers to feed them. Anyone who is a friend of cats and dogs is a friend of mine! But I am a bit concerned about Don seemingly getting better each trip at finding gold with his detector! This means less gold for the rest of us! This was the first time I met Bryan and found him to be a very nice and thoughtful man. Bryan was full of conversation and my prayers are with him for the serious challenge he now faces. I am looking forward in meeting Bryan again. Bryan, God Bless You! Rich is a retired Nurse and is ready to take care of any problem one might have. Rich even took George’s pulse, when George was not feeling good one day. Rich is a good man to have along! Tom is rock steady and also a good man to have on your side. Tom is cool with his detector and as mentioned before tended to find the larger pieces of gold. Way to go Tom! Jim is quite the fun character to have along. Jim is a good guy, an expert and has been detecting for years. Tell Jim a joke and he laughs very, long! I like that because I laugh too. When Jim speaks, I listen to his valuable detecting advice. Well, what can I say about George? How about that he is the best fisherman that I now know? Without George these trips would not happen and I have to thank George for that!

We all had a wonderful time and found plenty gold in the sea. But as always the real treasures are the times and moments spent with good friends. Good memories to last a lifetime! Those are worth far more than shiny, glittering gold! Guys, thanks for a good and safe trip!

Treasure hunting is fun. Looking for treasure is fun. Finding treasure is real fun! Finding treasure with your friends is the best! If you desire to look for gold on a most beautiful Caribbean beach, these treasure hunting adventure vacations organized by George Streeter can’t be beat! Give George a call, become a customer of his and ask about his next planned adventure. A slight warning though, once you go on a Caribbean treasure hunt, they get into your blood and you will want to go again and again! Happy hunting to all and may the gold be with you!



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What have you Found detecting?
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, February 11, 2010 - 06:26 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

What have you Found detecting?

By Norma Parda

I have to say, in all the years my husband and I have been detecting the best finds yet, have been the people we have met doing this hobby. From the very start, when we bought our first used Whites detector, we made our first friends in the hobby. The guy who sold it to us and his wife. To this day, 22 yrs later, we are still friends. No matter how long between visits of seeing each other, we pick up where we left off, and most of the talk is about our finds.

For another example, the editor of this paper. We met George when we bought our Eagle 2, and then later bought our Whites Spectrum, which is a great machine that we've had for a long time. Since then, about 21 yrs later or so, we still joke and talk about the hobby. He was the one who gave me my first writing job, which is for this paper, and which has been a great experience for me. Over the years many people have crossed our paths and we've become very good friends with many of them. Not just in the hobby, but also on personal levels. People young and old.

We met this young couple while we were out detecting in a field, in the rain, on a very chilly day. They were checking the area out and saw us detecting. They parked beside the field we were in and headed in my direction. My husband was a little distance away. At first I wondered why they were coming our way, and what they wanted. I was a little worried, but as they approached, I noticed they were young adults, and just curious about what we were doing. We started a conversation and I soon discovered they were detectorist as well. The guy had been detecting for a few years already, and his girlfriend went along with him and got into it too. We talked for some time and found fast friends in each other. They were college students at UMASS at the time and have since graduated and move East. But, that hasn't stopped our frequent visits. Three years later now, and we are the best of friends. We have 20 plus years of age between us, we being the older I hate to admit, but it sure doesn't matter to either of us. When we get together and go out hunting, none of that age stuff is a factor. We call each other when we find something good, and get excited for the other.

Along those same lines, we met a couple at our county fair while they were running a detecting booth there. Again, we struck up our many hobby finds conversation, and the rest is history. They are 20 yrs our senior, and the age span makes no difference. We get together and play cards, cook out, celebrate birthdays, special occasions, and everyday things together, just from that chance meeting at our local fair, with detecting being the catalyst that got it all started. We have met many more people through these people, who have also became good friends, and so the snowball effect takes wing.

We have been so blessed by having to been able to meet people from just this hobby alone. It's more than finding stuff which are just inanimate objects, it's all about the people who cross your path while enjoying this hobby that makes the difference, and always will. Family, friends, and people of all ages, that is what is the most important. Don't lose sight of that in anything you do, and your life will be richly blessed. God bless you all. And of course, happy hunting.



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Dreams of Aruba By Chris Valerio
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, February 11, 2010 - 06:26 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

Dreams of Aruba By Chris Valerio


I am not exactly sure when or how I was bitten by the treasure bug, but treasure hunting has always been in my blood as far back as I can remember. Even as a young boy I searched the beaches for treasures with my parents by the sea (rocks, shells, floats, driftwood). I believe my first real treasure found, was a 1,000 year old skeleton castle key on a trip to Europe with my parents. I simply could not get over that that key was older than me and The United States of America, and it was as though I had discovered The Lost Ark! To this day mention the word treasure and you’ll have my full attention, with visions of gold, pirates, rum, whatnot and loot dancing through my vivid imagination! Oops, did I inadvertently mention rum and whatnot here? What could the whatnot be? Please forgive me as I have been known to get carried-away at times when stricken by Gold Fever!

If there ever was or really is a problem with my lust for treasure, it is that I have always been lusting for too many treasures. That is I’m interested in old coins, gold nuggets, lost jewelry, historic artifacts, gemstones, lost, hidden and buried treasure and so on. If it involves treasure I like it! I must also point out that there are many other sorts of treasure I did not mention, such as waterlogged old growth timber, rocks and meteorites, fossils, old bones and ancient ivory. Even possible thrift store treasures! Then there are also the natural treasures such as sunsets, babies, fresh air, dogs and family. Did I mention cold beer, hot dogs, apple pie, boats, fishing, Big Macs and BBQ in general? The problem is that with so many treasures knocking at my door, I could spend 3 lifetimes searching for them! I believe the reason I’m more of a dreaming treasure hunter is because I may have spread myself too thin! One only has to point to my treasure hunting library consisting of hundreds of books on the subject, to see that! Care to check one out? And then there is my treasure hunting file cabinet full of magazine articles, maps, brochures and personal treasure notations. Why with all that stuff to read and ponder, one might think that I am some sort of treasure hunting hound? On top of all this there is my famous wall of detectors, digging instruments and other necessary tools of the trade, including scales, gold and diamond testers and more whatnots! Why I would even own a burro or 2 if it were practical! Hey do them critters eat grass? Because I have about an acre to mow!

Now that I am thinking about all of this, I can sort of hold Charlie Garrett of Garrett Metal Detectors somewhat responsible for my fever! I read all of his books and Mr. Garrett fully convinced me that I could actually find treasure with my Grand Master metal detector! Plus Mr. Garrett says treasure hunting is healthful. I now agree with all that walking, digging and such. And for many years with Garrett setting the tone, I discovered the treasure of satisfaction. Weekends found me and a buddy or two, their wives and 1 dog, hunting for real treasure in the great outdoors. We searched for meteorites, buried loot, gold coins, dredging rivers and took my 86 Toyota 4-Runner into places a rabbit wouldn’t go! I can remember three of us once digging an 8’ deep hole with shovels by hand! What we found? Dirt! We even detected the exact same tailing piles for large goose egg gold nuggets that Garrett described in one of his books. On that adventure we discovered mosquitoes, but walking in the footsteps of Garrett was an honor! Such is the life of a treasure hunter!

Once my female black lab Bantu (named after an African tribe and who one day showed up unexpectedly in my life on a scuba diving trip, and adopted both my lunch and I, but now resides in doggie Heaven) disappeared into the bush while we were metal detecting Red Top Mountain for beautiful Liberty Washington State wire gold. After several hours I heard some serious rustling and growling behind a pine tree, only to see Bantu eventually immerge out of that tangle in reverse and dragging something. That something turned out to be what was left of an elk carcass! Then there was the time we followed one old time treasure story to an end conclusion. Most time spent was on research and a lot of it. The icing on all of this was the actual field work and search for the treasure. This involved a treacherous hike through the Rainforest vines and stickers of our Pacific Northwest jungle. We found the exact spot at a place named Oxbow along a river and discovered nearly everything about this treasure story was true except 1 thing. The treasure! There never was a treasure to be found. I should have discovered that during the research phase, because the only thing I could not verify in this yarn, was any mention of the treasure. Yet Gold Fever got the better of us and we wanted the treasure to be, and went in search of Fools Gold! Yet this was a valuable learning experience and there still was a sense of satisfaction even though we came up empty handed. I guess I should have been somewhat suspicious when the treasure was supposedly buried under a big rock, that looked like the fin of a fish! But you know, I’ve been thinking… perhaps we just missed that rock and should go back for another look-see? A stiff drink just might set my mind straight and at ease on this!

I also would like to blame treasure hunting magazine articles. Those articles helped to fuel the fire. 2 of which in particular are forever etched in my mind. One a successful story of water hunting with metal detectors for lost gold jewelry on the Caribbean Island of Guadeloupe, and the other about finding a Piece of Eight and 2 gold nuggets on the Island of Aruba. Wow, the idea of adding travel to exotic places along with treasure was simply too much to resist! So I started files on Aruba and Guadeloupe knowing one day I would visit each to find my share. Why I know so much about Aruba I could be a tour guide there! But the years passed by and those Islands were always calling me. Kind of like in the movie South Pacific. (Uh, did I just give away my age? Nope!)

Enter George Streeter, one of the worlds Greatest Shallow Water Treasure Hunters! Well I did not always know that. I had recently discovered using the computer for treasure hunting research and had read everything I could get my hands on at the local library! The only thing left for me was surfing the internet. Then one day I received an email from George Streeter. To this day I do not know how or why? But that did not matter at the time, because this email naturally spoke of treasure and hundreds of gold rings found by Streeter and his crew in the Caribbean! I mean hundreds of pieces of gold found in the sea on every trip! I wondered could this claim be for real as I lapsed again into another spell of Gold Fever? It just sounded too good to be true? Why I had yet to find my first gold ring and here was a man who claimed to have found thousands! At the bottom of his Spiel was printed in all capitals “WANT TO COME ALONG ON MY NEXT TRIP?”, or something to that effect. Do I want to come along to scoop up all that gold? Heck yes, that‘s a no-brainer! So George, count me in on your next trip! I will pay my way and share in all related group expenses! Boy that was simple. Only I did not realize at the time George would have to first actually invite me! I knew that I needed to play my cards right, so I made up the best letter about myself that I could, presented it to George and crossed all shovels, in hopes that my resume would work magic. And Poof, it did as I was eventually invited to go Caribbean treasure hunting with George Streeter!

Know what? Finding 100 pieces of gold jewelry on a Caribbean 10 day to 2 week trip turned out to be true, and I found my first gold wedding band on my first trip with George! And no he did not toss it in front of me either, thank you very much! I have since gone on many such adventures with George and found my fair share of the gold! George has been a great teacher, even though he professes not to be a treasure hunting teacher! Yet just by going with George, what one learns from George is worth thousands of Dollars! Even when unspoken and by simple observation!

Even though I had always dreamed about going to Guadeloupe long before I ever met George, he got me there! And several times too, and each time loaded down with 18K found gold! Plus many other Caribbean Islands too. I could talk about those other Treasure Isles visited for hours. They include The Bahamas, Grand Camen, Puerto Rico, Dominica, St Martin, Curacao, Barbados and more! But there was one island that always seemed to elude me, Aruba! The island that sort of was a treasure dream of mine. But every time George went to Aruba to hunt for gold in the sea, I could not take the time off! Each time I passed on Aruba killed me. Well figuratively! It got so bad that I almost went to Aruba alone, but came to my senses in the nick of time. I was beginning to think Aruba was simply out of my reach and grasp, despite knowing for years exactly where I would find the gold there! Yes, as far as I was concerned Aruba was simply loaded with gold and I had known that for years! With place names such a Spanish Lagoon and Palm Beach, how could this not be?

Just about the time I sort of gave up on Aruba forever, I was again invited by George to go with his group to Aruba. I just knew that if I passed this time, I might never get there. So I did what it took to go on that trip. Only this time it ended up that George could not come along! Well that was a real heartbreaker as George helps to make these trips fun! When I found out our fearless leader was not going I almost cancelled. Yet the call of Aruba was too strong and I needed to get this Island out of my system once and for all. This trip would do exactly that! Besides I would not be alone. I would be with other treasure hunting brothers and sometimes sisters too! Yup, show me a treasure hunter and I will show you a good friend for life! That is if a dose of stiff competition does not get in the way!

I think the best thing about this treasure hunting vacation was that I was actually going to the island of my dreams. I had been so close once before when I visited Curacao with George, but now I was Aruba bound and the gold would be mine! I should mention that leaving on this trip was sort of bitter sweet. Not only was George not going, but that whole Natalie Holloway affair had left a bad taste in my mouth for Aruba. But as soon as that big jet airliner took off for the clouds, only dreams of treasure filled my mind. Deep down I knew that over the years I had turned Aruba into a golden goose of treasures and that I might very well be disappointed. In a way I almost did not want to find out by letting the dream remain just that, a dream.

I found Aruba to be beautiful and our group of treasure hunters friendly. We got along well, shared most expenses and detected as many beaches as possible. Unfortunately my golden dreams were crushed, as there was little treasure to be found. Unknown to us a big winter storm had brought tons of sand in and sent most all the gold to sea. We found a few pieces here and there, but nothing like what I had built up in my mind and hoped for! Though this seamed a defeat we made the best of our trip with great dinners and some sightseeing trips. I finally got to see all the places I read about over the years. But I have to say the best treasure hunting experience that has ever happened to me, happened on this trip, making the wait all worthwhile. Destiny took years to get me to Aruba so I could be there at a very critical moment in time.

It was late in the afternoon and we had been detecting hard in the sea for gold most of the day. I was empty handed again and somewhat tired. I found myself in one of those all-day detecting trances. Kind of like in those Westerns where they have to cross a vast burning dessert without much water. Suddenly my rhythmic sweeping of the detector coil was interrupted by a beautiful and golden bikini clad woman. She called to me and when I finally took my headphones off, I saw her pointing and heard her say something like, “she needs you“! Was I hallucinating? Did the hot sun, sand, salt sea and long unfruitful days in the field finally get to me? Was I really needed by some damsel in distress? Why yes I could see another young lady on the beach in tears. A bit reluctant at first I made my way towards her. She was shaking from head to toe and said she had just lost her engagement ring. She desperately needed my help. At first I thought good luck, as I had found nothing all day. Plus in the past many who asked me to look for their lost ring, were not exactly sure where it was lost and there‘s lots of Real Estate out there! I was about to call it a day and now this woman asked more of me. But when I looked into her eyes, I knew what I had to do. I inquired if she knew where she may have lost her ring and much to my surprise she knew exactly. She had taken her ring off to apply some suntan lotion, setting her ring on a towel. Later she forgot about the ring and shook the sand from her towel, only recalling this when she discovered her ring was missing. Now I know that this can be very upsetting, but this gal was nearly in trauma and I was more concerned about her physical well-being than the ring! I tried to calm her and told her I would find the ring. The pressure was now on big time and at the area in question and loss, I directed her family and friends to remove all the beach hardware and chairs. Soon a large crowd of onlookers gathered watching my every move as this unfolded. I asked her mother what sort of ring I was looking for and she told me it was silver. I found that rather odd, as who would get so upset over a silver ring? Nonetheless I started searching for high silver tones with my detector and started finding coin after coin. After a few minutes I asked the mother if the ring was really silver and she finally admitted that it was indeed white gold. Then I finally knew what tone to really listen for, aluminum! In a few more minutes I got a good gold/aluminum tone hit and carefully scooped a few inches deep in the dry sand. As the sand fell away I simply could not believe the ring I saw glinting in the sun at the bottom of my scoop! There were big diamonds everywhere and I knew why the mother had originally told me the ring was silver- she feared I might try to keep the ring if found! This was the most beautiful and expensive ladies ring I had ever held! Someone in the crowd declared that I had found the ring and everybody cheered. But before I could celebrate, the young lady said there is another ring somewhere in the sand to complete the set. So I started searching again and soon got another good hit. This time I dug with my hand so not to damage anything and came up with another stunning ring totally surrounded by big diamonds! Upon this the woman fell into my arms, and it became clear to me that I had saved the day! Her mother then told me those 2 rings were worth more than $75,000! I told here I would have gone nuts if I had found those rings in the sea, but this was not the case and I was happy to reunite these rings with the rightful owner. A reward was offered but graciously declined. But still, I can just imagine finding such a ring in the sea. I took satisfaction in knowing such rings are actually out there, and I now wondered about detecting the dry sand more. This young lady along with her friends and family, did not even try looking for the rings in the sand. They simply assumed the sand had gobbled them up forever. Were it me, I would have been pushing sand with my hands! Had I not come along with my machine, those rings might still be there baking in the sand today! But the right thing happened and I was glad for that. That ladies vacation was restored and I simply waded off into the sunset.

I had a wonderful time in Aruba despite finding little gold on this particular trip. I was with good friends, ate delicious food, experienced some wonderful nightlife and saw the sights! Those are some real treasures. At first I may have been a bit disappointed, but Aruba slowly won me over and I would go back again. As a matter of fact there is a little known treasure story of a huge golden hoard hidden in a cave on Aruba. This was a political treasure of the time, and is clearly calling to be found. Let the dreams roll on!



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Treasure Hunter's Gazette Early Winter 2009-2010
Posted by: Webmaster on Friday, December 04, 2009 - 03:59 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

Treasure Hunter's Gazette Early Winter 2009-2010

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Whites Electronics Spectra V-3 . First Impressions…Awesome Power….
Posted by: Webmaster on Saturday, September 12, 2009 - 11:53 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Whites Electronics Spectra V-3 .  First Impressions…Awesome Power…. Bernard Kravitz.

In August of 2009 I started using the Spectra V-3.  So far I have been impressed and equally glad that I have added this machine to my stable of detectors.  It is important to point out that I have been a lifelong user of metal detectors produced by Whites Electronics.  My DFX now resides next to the V-3.

In the past month my finds include two pre 1800 copper coins (most likely King George), several mercury dimes, a gold cross, a pocket watch, a gilded button, and a variety of farm items.  Most of the detecting occurred in a New Hampshire hay field.  The owner was excited when I found a metal plate with the name of the original owner of the farm.

The Spectra V-3 is a breeze to set up and get running.  The opening menu allows for easy navigation.  This is a nice improvement over the DFX navigation system. I was able to select a hunting mode and go.  The machine runs well and is extremely stable over a variant of soil conditions.

I have a variety of coils that I purchased to use with the V-3 (the coils from my DFX were too old to use with the V-3)  I have the 9.5 concentric coil that is optimized for salty environments, but I have yet to try the beaches. I will head to the beaches in the near future.  I plan on hunting stone walls with the Eclipse DD 4x6.  The Eclipse 5.3 performed well in a high trash park (with my DFX I found the 5.3 coil to find silver in parks filled with tabs, foil and other trash items… the same was true with this coil on a V3)

The one V-3 attribute that has impressed me the most was the Active Analyze Screen.  The first thing it is accurate and dependable.  It allowed me to analyze a potential target with confidence.     I was able to clearly avoid targets that I would have dug with the DFX.  I found the Active Analyze Screen to be a dependable option when I hunted a in a hay field.  In conjunction with dependable VID numbers the active analyze screen is one of the best features of this machine.

Hunting on the farm presented a variety of challenges… one being the electrical interference from the fence used to keep us separated from the bulls.  The frequency offset allowed me to hunt closer to the source of the interference.  This allowed me close enough to the area where I found my first King George.
  
As my time with the V-3 increased so did my position on the V-3 –Learning Curve.  I found the Live Control probe options be interesting and useful.  I was able to probe the ground and optimally set the RX Gain.  This helped improve depth and minimize false sensing from a setting that might have been too high.

I must state that I have not yet used the wireless headphones..  I must say that the weather has been too darn hot to use headphones that cover my ears.  I will try these them out this fall and winter.  I look forward to the freedom that a wireless system affords the user.  It would be nice to have some head phone options for ear size and season.  Maybe next year.

I found the Spectra to be a giant leap from the DFX.  I must say I have the DFX and will keep it in the active line up.  But the V-3 is worth the investment.  Its performance is superb, the color screen is bright and efficient even in bright sunlight, the menu based navigation system is outstanding and intuitive, the live controls allow the user to make changes on the fly, and the NiMH battery provides power for long hours of hunting.

If you are considering an upgrading your detector … consider the Whites Spectra V-3.     It is an investment that you will not regret.



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Treasure Hunters Gazette Sept-Oct 2009
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, August 27, 2009 - 04:05 PM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Treasure Hunter's Gazette Sept-Oct 2009

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Treasure Hunter’s St Jude Hospital Fund Cookout & metal detector planted hunts
Posted by: GeorgeStreeter on Monday, August 03, 2009 - 03:54 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

 

Treasure Hunter's, Columbus Day, St Jude Hospital Fund Cookout & metal detector hunts

Notice!

For Treasure Hunter's Gazette readers, Professional Treasure Hunters, Best O' New England & North East Metal Detecting Forum members & guestsBONE 16 events in 2009, made $250 in profits for St Jude Children’s Research Hospital. With additional donations from friends, members & the PTHHS, our 2009 donation is now over $500. There were prizes left over from the BONE 16 events & we will use some for prizes at the St Jude cookout & the rest will be use at BONE 17 April 23, 24 & 25th, 2010

ALL INVITED

St. Jude Hospital Fund cookout & metal detector hunts on Columbus Day, Monday, Oct. 12, 2009

@ Post 24 Legion, Rte 101, Marlborough, NH

NOTE!! Must have 25 register before Oct. 1, 2009, for the event to be a go.

There is a cover charges for hunts & the cookout is free for members & guests.
$25 donation cover charge for both hunts for members & if not a member, the hunts are $20 each. Profits benefit our St Jude Hospital Fund.

Schedule

10:am to 2:pm Minelab & Garrett metal detector booths & maybe some workshops in Legion Hall

Each hunt is limited to just 25 hunters, so register early

10:am - 11am, 1st Treasure Hunt. All metal detector hunters must wear headphones, use a spreadsheet to put dirt on, and fill in all holes neatly. Noon! Cookout is hot dogs & hamburgers, chips & cold soda. Salads, hot or cold dishes & desserts donations appreciated. 2:pm to 3:pm, 2nd Treasure Hunt. One hunters per metal detector, & all hunters must wear headphones, use a spreadsheet to put dirt on, and fill in all holes neatly.

The Treasure Hunter’s St Jude Hospital Fund Cookout, & planted hunt's profits to benefit the PTHHS St Jude Children's Research Hospital Fund

Any questions or to volunteer to help, contact George Streeter 603/876-4443, email gstreeter@ne.rr.com or write care of 307 Main St., Marlborough, NH 03455

Brian Thomas, Peterborough, NH will be hunt master & he will need help. Volunteers needed

to help bury coin & tokens for hunt,
to do 3 workshops in Legion

Help with the Minelab & Garrett booths.
help for the gold panning & Best Finds Contest .



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Hunting Backwards
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, July 16, 2009 - 07:20 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Hunting Backwards

By Bob Krupicka (RelicHunter Bob), Brookline, NH


It all started in March 2008. I was attending DIV IX in Culpeper, Virginia. For those not familiar, Diggin' In Virginia (DIV) is an invitational hunt dedicated to the ideals of friendship, fun and the proper recovery/identification of historical artifacts. They are held on private property under contract with the land owners. On this hunt there were about 300 of us on a 1,200 acre farm where there had been documented Civil War activity.  I had been on several of these hunts over the last two years. They are three days long starting on a Friday held each year in the Spring and Fall. They start with a Thursday night pre-hunt meeting where we get to hear the rules and where we will be the next morning. There are usually several tables set up where vendors offer some metal detecting related items. At one such table this time, for display only, was this new Whites Pulse Induction (PI) machine. I had read about this rumored new machine for several months. Here it was. Big Bobby, one of White's long time distributors, had a prototype that he was going to be testing at DIV IX.

This part of Virginia has highly mineralized red soil. It makes it very tough to detect in until you become experienced detecting in it. At my first hunt, DIV VII, I was in a corn field on a 3,400 acre estate with about 250 other people. I was using my DFX in Relic mode as had been suggested by many. Hunt in all metal mode and dig every signal they had said. In my first 15 minutes I got a strong signal that was showing about 5" deep. I cut out a plug and got a signal in the plug. I broke it in half and a signal in the half I was holding. I broke it in half again. I had two soft ball size clumps of red soil. I took a guess and laid one down. Bingo, the signal was in the clump I had. I slowly took it apart not wanting to damage a potential brass button. Nothing, I scanned the crumpled dirt and nothing. However the other clump showed a signal. I repeated this process with it and then the other half. I checked the hole with my DFX and pin pointer and no more signals. A newly made friend from Pa., who had hunted here several times, explained to me that I had just had my first experience with the red mineralized soil. I went on hunting and over the three days I found my first Civil war relics. Brass finds: eagle button, kepi buckle, rifle sling buckle, J hook and rivet. Iron finds: various belt and pack buckles, watering bit for a horse, horse and mule shoes and lots farm parts and nails. Many, many nails! Also found a musket ball and several types and calibers of two and three ring mini balls.

Lunch is put out around 11:30 each day. Some grab a lunch and head out and others sit, eat and chat about the mornings hunting. It was on this first day that we started hearing how Big Bobby was doing with the TDI. He was finding tons of bullets and buttons. Many in areas others had just hunted. He would even follow a short distance behind some of his friends to show them what they had missed. At the Sunday BBQ you are encouraged to display your finds. Bobby had a large case full of brass items he had found. The most interesting fact was that after 2 1/2 days of hunting he had only dug several nails.

The rest of us were digging several nails an

hour! It was at this point that I decided I wanted one of these new White’s TDI's for relic hunting in the Virginia mineralized soil.

I got back to NH and contacted Streeter to find out about getting one of these new machines. George said you want a what? Seems White's hadn't officially announced the machine so their dealer weren't aware of them. George, a long time White's dealer, called one of the White's Distributors & directly placed an order for one. It was going to take a few weeks as they weren't in production yet and were being handmade.

Sooner then I thought, I got my TDI and started learning how to use it. For those not familiar with this model, it has no display. You just hear high and low tones. With the TDI you have the option of hearing both tones or just one.

My wife Wendy & I were selected for Div. X with about 350 other people. The estate, we were to hunt was about 2,000 acres. I couldn't wait to try the TDI out in Virginia. Two days into the hunt and I had only found one button, my mail target. I spoke on Saturday night with friend Doc Rodney who also had recently got a TDI. Doc is an ER doctor by trade. He is an avid relic hunter in his free time and a walking encyclopedia on the Civil War and relics. He told me of a hill that had been named button hill there were some many buttons found there. He said there was part of it that had tall grass and hadn't been hunted much. He said hunt in low conductivity mode in the grass area if you want to find buttons. I knew where the area was and headed there first thing Sunday morning. The tall grass was about waist high. Now I knew why it hadn't been really hunted. The area I was looking at was about 50 by 90 feet. How do you swing a 12" coil in heavy tall grass. The answer is you hunt backwards! It is easier to pull than push through the grass. Furthermore, as you walk backwards you are flattening out the grass. I checked out the area and there were no holes, rocks or branches to worry about tripping over. On my first pass I found an eagle button. After a few passes I had a wide enough area to do a good size swing on each subsequent pass. I ended up finding one ball and 12 eagle buttons, two brass rivets and an iron gun tool. The gun tool although only 4" deep hadn't registered in the low conductivity mode. I found it with my pin pointer while looking for a button. This was all found in the bottom half of the tall grass area. Two others were trying to hunt the rest in the traditional manner with little success. Best find was a gold gild Eagle I button.

So next time you see an area not being hunted because it is over grown, consider hunting it backwards. It worked for me.



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Brian Thomas's Opinion on the White's Spectra V3
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, July 16, 2009 - 07:19 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Brian Thomas's Opinion on the White's Spectra V3

by Brian Thomas, Peterborough, NH

My metal detector dealer friend, Streeter gave me the opportunity to test the new White's Spectra V3 metal detector. WOW !! I used the V3 at a small park, several fields, a well maintained public gathering place, and a couple of night detecting forays.

In 2 weeks, I was able to put about 15 hours of solid detecting time, behind the swing.

Several things about the swing that were of particular notice to me. First, I was surprised at the center of gravity (balance) difference from my personal detector (to remain brand-less for this writing). Second while swinging with my right arm, was the continued interference of the battery box hitting my pin-pointer and digger on my belt.

After a short time the swing became familiar and easy to maneuver. I swing for extended times with both arms, and became comfortable with the balance of the V3.. However, with my pinpointer in my favorite place, I continued to hit my pinpointer on my belt when swinging with my right arm. The only way to avoid this was to ether move the items or extend my arm out away from my body further. This way caused severe fatigue. In the end I could not adjust my swing with my right arm to become comfortable. Maybe if this was my personal detector I could live with the dings that would end up on it, but it is Georges & I was very careful not to injure the detector.

The V3 has a nice rechargeable battery pack and a regular battery pack that holds 8 double A's. The battery life indicator is easy to identify. The detector uses a lot of power, and battery life is not as robust as I had anticipated. There are some features that are power drains. One being the TX boost. I did not run the detector long enough to see the advantages of this feature. Another is the backlight. During day light detecting, there is not much use for this and thus you can save battery life by turning it down or off.

I ran the V3 at night for about three hours a couple of times. One of the really nice features of the V3 was the ability of the backlight. I would start out with it on, and after a few minutes shut it off, and the residual light from the LCD would leave a very nice amount of light. Detecting with the LCD back light on is interesting. Your swing leaves a streak of light in your swings path. This causes your eyes to constantly adjust. But, with the back light off, the glow from the LCD is just right. For those of you that detect at night, you should like this feature. My personal detector has no light at all, so I run strictly by sound, and then turn my head lamp on for VDI confirmation.

I ran the V3 in a city park on my lunch break one afternoon. This is a park in Manchester that has undoubtedly been detected many, many times. I switched the detector to high trash, and swing away. I was surprised and happy with the level of nulling. I swung the detector directly over pull tabs and bottle caps and was pleased with the response of the nulling out. This is exactly what I would hope for. Although you will bypass good finds, using this detector will allow you to hunt city parks with results. I found a silver, Ben Franklin half dollar that lunch break. I think this detector, in the hands of someone that takes the time to learn the menu's and programs will be very successful in places that have been "hunted out".

You can customize your own high trash program or any other. This is a great feature. It's easy to save your own settings and retrieve them. So when you are going between hunt sites, you can reset that program for that location.

I went to an old field that I had recently found 1700's coins and many buttons. I was able to dig a couple more buttons at 10 inches that I surely missed before. I wish I had more time at is field with the V3. I'm sure to have found some deeper targets.

The wireless headphone feature is awesome, however a bit expensive at $250.. No cord! One great feature for the wireless headphones is that more than one set of headphones can be used for a single detector. The headphones are really comfortable. But, as with most things, there is one serious drawback to these headphones. The fabric covering the foam is very thin, and the stitching is not adequate. The fabric rips easily.

After using the V3 , I was impressed and pleased with the detector. Although there are lots of menu picks and selection choices. Taking the time to learn this detector will certainly reward the owner with new finds in old hunting grounds.

This particular metal detector was purchased by Peter Osowski, Gardner, MA



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Around the World Recipes
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, July 16, 2009 - 07:19 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Around the World Recipes

Coconut Meringue Pie

makes two pies

Filling:
5 cups of half and half
1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter or margarine
1 cup granulated sugar
3 extra-large eggs
1/4 cup cornstarch
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 cup miniature marshmallows
1 1/4 cups flaked coconut
1 baked 9-inch pie shells

Meringue:
1 1/4 cups egg whites (from 8 - 9 extra-large eggs)
1 teaspoon cream of tartar
1 1/2 cups granulated sugar

For the filling:
In a large saucepan, combine the half and half and butter.
bring just to a boil over medium heat.
Ina a medium bowl, whisk together the sugar, eggs, cornstarch, vanilla, and salt until the cornstarch is completely dissolved and mixture if well-blended. gradually add to the mixture in the saucepan, stirring constantly with a wire whisk.
Cook, stirring constantly, about 1 minute of until thickened.
Add the marshmallows and 3/4 cup of the coconut.
Cook and stir until the marshmallows melt and the mixture is well-blended.
Pour into pie shells (2).
refrigerate at least two ours.
heat the oven to 350 degrees F.

For the meringue:
In a large bowl, beat the egg whites and cream
of tartar until soft peaks form.
Add the sugar, a small amount at a time, beating
constantly until stiff peaks form.
Spread half the meringue over each pie to the edge of the
crust.
Sprinkle each with 1/4 cup of the remaining coconut.
Bake 12-15 minutes or until lightly browned.
Refrigerate until ready to serve.
Makes two nine-inch pies.

Langouste al ajillo

(fried lobster in garlic sauce)
Serves: four to twenty, depending on use
Preparation time: Under thirty minutes
Ingredients:
(A) The meat from one large lobster or about two pounds of lobster meat.
Always at their best when fresh. If frozen, thaw quickly under running tap water. In all cases, rinse in tap water and set on paper towel to drain excess moisture.
Dice into bite size pieces.
(B) 1/2 cup white wine
1 teaspoonful ground garlic
1 teaspoonful of parsley flakes
1/3 teaspoonful ground oregano
1/3 teaspoonful ground Italian Red Pepper
2 tablespoonfuls melted butter
Preparation:
Blend all the ingredients in B together. If possible, use the same dish for cooking and serving, to preserve the light gravy.
Baste the lobster meat thoroughly in the mixture.
If you have time to spare, allow the lobster to
marinate in the mixture for at least two hours, covered, in your refrigerator.
Mari nation works wonders for this dish.
Microwave for about 4 minutes on HIGH or cook in the range over medium to medium high heat for about eight minutes. Stir at
least once throughout the cooking process. The lobster is ready to eat when its color is
paper white. Do not overcook. Since the cooking time is so short, you are well
advised to watch them continuously to learn the best cooking time in your circumstances.
Most probably, you'll be asked to repeat this recipe many times!
For finicky diners, hold the Italian Red Pepper and add at the table.
Serve as a fitting appetizer for almost any occasion!
Or convert to a full dish by adding the lobster to a bowl of spaghetti. Enjoy!

Budin de pan (Bread pudding)

Ingredients:
(A) 1/2 pound of bread, after removing the outside rind This can be French bread, Puerto Rican pan criollo, sandwich bread,
etc.
Bread can be fresh or preferably one or two days old.

4 cups whole milk, warm

4 large eggs at room temperature

4 tablespoonfuls butter, melted

(B) 2/3 cup raisins

teaspoonful ground cinnamon

1 cup sugar or suitable substitute like Equal or
Splenda
1 teaspoonful vanilla
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/3 teaspoon salt
Procedure:
Mix together the ingredients included in (B) and set aside.
Shred the bread into small pieces. Add 4 cups warmed milk and whisk until the bread soaks up the milk. If necessary, let stand 15 minutes
for the bread to soak up all the milk.
Beat 4 large eggs. Add slowly to the bread and milk mix, whisking the eggs into the mix. Add the melted butter and whisk in.
Add the ingredients included in (B) which you had previously mixed together. Blend in thoroughly.
Pour all ingredients into a buttered baking dish.
Place the baking dish into a much larger dish. After placing the baking dish into the larger dish, add enough water to the larger dish to fill
it nearly three-quarters full.
Bake in a pre-heated oven at 350 degrees. It will take approximately one hour for the pudding to reach the desired
consistency. Add water to the larger dish if necessary.
Alternately, you may use a "Baño de María" or double boiler to cook the pudding on the range over medium heat. Add water to the bottom section of the double boiler as necessary.
Try not to overcook. The pudding should be removed from heat as soon as it shows consistency (a couple of minutes earlier than
you would normally remove a cake).
Some people like to eat it warm. For best results, though, refrigerate before serving. It will last two to three days, well covered, in the
refrigerator. Enjoy.

Quick Caribbean Chicken

1/4 tsp salt
12 oz chicken tenderloin strips
1/8 to 1/4 tsp ground red pepper
1 tsp oil
1 med sweet potato, peeled halved and thinly sliced
1 small banana pepper, peeled seeded and chopped
3/4 cup unsweetened pineapple juice
1 tsp cornstarch
2 unripe bananas, diced in 3/4 in cubes
cooked brown rice
Season chicken with salt and red pepper. Heat oil in a large
nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add chicken and cook for 3-4 min.
Add sweet potato and banana pepper, cook and stir for 5-6 min. In a
small bowl stir together pineapple juice and cornstarch. Add to skillet, cook, stirring gently til bubbly. Add bananas, cook & stir 2 min more and serve over rice. 4 servings.


LEMON MERINGUE PIE RECIPE

I wouldn't go so far as to claim that Lemon Meringue Pie is a South African invention.
However, it is a South African favorite.

Any restaurant offering morning and afternoon tea/coffee and cake that doesn't have a Lemon Meringue Pie on the menu is looking to lose customers.
Also, through the ages, South African cooks have added their own improvements to the basic Lemon Meringue Pie Recipe.
In this sense the Lemon Meringue Pie Recipe given here may, at a stretch, be considered a truly traditional and authentic South African recipe.
For the pie you obviously need a pie shell, for this I use a rich, sweet shortcrust pastry.
Rich, because the Lemon Meringue itself is rich and sweet to compliment the sweet meringue and contrast with the tart sweetness of the lemon pie filling.
SHORTCRUST PASTRY PIE SHELL:-
Note, this Shortcrust Pastry recipe will make 4 pie shells. Presumably, you won't be making 4 Lemon Meringue Pies at the same time, so you can either halve the quantities or wrap the pastry in waxed paper and chill until needed. Will last for a week in the refrigerator. DO NOT FREEZE.
500g cake flour (1 lb 1 ½ oz)
350g shortening (12 ½ oz) (butter, a combination of 50% butter and 50% lard, or margarine)
125ml iced water (½ cup)
40 g sugar (granulated) (1 ½ oz)
25 ml lemon juice. Preferably freshly squeezed. (2 tbsp)
5ml Salt (1 tsp)
1 Egg
Double sift the dry ingredients (flour, sugar & salt) together into a mixing bowl.
Cut the shortening into the dry mixture and rub until the mixture takes on the appearance of coarse crumbs.
Sprinkle the water and lemon juice onto the crumb mixture and press together lightly to form a solid mass.

IMPORTANT: Do not knead the pastry and avoid over working.
Wrap in waxed paper and chill until required.
As an added taste I often add 10 ml (2 teaspoons) of lemon zest (the finely grated outside either yellow or green of a lemon) to the dry ingredients when I know that I am going to be using the pastry for Lemon Meringue Pies.
When ready for use, line pie tins with the pastry and bake at 190oC (375oF) for 15 minutes

LEMON MERINGUE PIE FILLING
250g (sweetened condensed milk (9 oz)
65ml castor sugar (6 tbsp)
3 medium sized lemons
3 eggs

Juice the lemons and using a rasp grate the outside of the lemons to obtain the zest. Be careful to only grate the outer colored skin of the lemons and not the white pith.
Separate the eggs.
In a mixing bowl beat together the egg yolks, lemon zest and lemon juice until the mixture becomes thick and creamy.
Beat in the condensed milk and pour the resulting mixture into a baked pastry shell.
Using a clean bowl beat together the egg whites and castor sugar until the mixture forms stiff peaks, be careful not to beat so much that the meringue mixture becomes dry.
Spoon the meringue mixture over the lemon pie filling. Do not smooth the top.

Bake in a pre-heated oven at 180oC (350oF) for 25 minutes.
Remove and allow to cool.
Serve the Lemon Meringue Pie cold; some people prefer to chill Lemon Meringues in a refrigerator before serving.

HERTZOG COOKIES

Hertzog Cookies, or Hertzoggies, a delicious blend of coconut and apricot jam, are uniquely South African cookies

The Cookie Pastry:
· 1 lb self-raising flour
· 4 Tbsp sugar
· 2 Tbsp margarine
· 3 egg yolks
· milk or water (as required)
· 1 tsp vanilla essence
· ¼ tsp salt

Beat the margarine and sugar together in a bowl to a light and creamy consistency
Stir in the egg yolks and vanilla essence, taking care to blend well.
Sift the flour and the salt into the mixture, ensuring that it is thoroughly mixed.
Stir in enough milk or water so that a fairly stiff dough is formed.

Place the dough on a floured surface and roll out to a ¼ inch thickness. Cut into rounds with a cookie cutter.
Line a greased patty tin with the rounds of dough.

The Cookie filling:
· 3 egg whites, stiffly beaten
· 2 cups desiccated coconut
· 1 cup sugar
· apricot jam

Gradually add the sugar to the beaten egg whites, beating well to blend.
Fold the coconut into the mixture and mix well.
Place a little apricot jam in the center of the rounds in the patties and spoon some of the coconut mixture over the jam.
Bake in the oven at 400o F for approximately 15 minutes. The pastry should be a light golden color.
Leave to cool slightly in the patty tin and then place on a rack and let the cookies cool completely.

Makes approximately 60 cookies. These may be stored in an airtight container for 2 weeks



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Don't Be Fuelish, Save Gas Money
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, July 16, 2009 - 07:17 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Don't Be Fuelish, Save Gas Money

(NAPSI)-With gas prices soaring, drivers and their gas dollars aren't going nearly as far as they used to. However, there are a number of things you can do to help improve your car's fuel efficiency. Here are six tips to maximize your car's performance.

1. Check your tire pressure. Improperly inflated tires can greatly reduce your fuel economy, so make sure your tires are inflated to the manufacturer's recommended pressure level. The right tire pressure will provide you with a safer ride and help reduce wear on the tires.

2. Maintain your vehicle. Replacing a dirty, clogged air filter will go a long way in improving your car's fuel efficiency. According to the federal government, your car's gas mileage could improve by as much as 10 percent with a clean air filter. In addition to the fuel savings, the new filter will help protect your engine as well.

3. Clean your fuel system. Carbon and resin buildup in your car's fuel system stifles your engine's ability to breathe and reduces fuel efficiency. Flush out your fuel system, including the fuel injector, intake valve and combustion chamber, with a specialized tank additive, such as 3M Fuel System Cleaner. Have your fuel system professionally cleaned by shops that use the complete 3M Fuel Injector Cleaning System. By keeping your fuel system clean, you'll improve your vehicle's fuel economy.

4. Take it easy and slow down. Driving your car at high speed, "jackrabbit starts" and aggressive driving in traffic can greatly reduce fuel efficiency. The U.S. Department of Energy says, "As a rule of thumb, you can assume that each 5 mph you drive over 60 mph is like paying an additional $0.20 per gallon for gas." And every time you "hit the gas," you get closer to your next refill.

5. Remove excessive weight. Remove any unnecessary objects in your vehicle, especially heavy items. An extra 100 pounds in your vehicle could reduce fuel efficiency by as much as 2 percent. Lighten up and your mileage will go up.

6. Use your air-conditioning sparingly. Don't just run your air conditioner out of habit in the summer. If it's not too hot out, try using the fan setting alone. This will help you get more miles to the gallon.

For additional information, visit www.3Mcarcare.com.

Keeping your fuel system clean will put you on the road to better gas economy.



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Keep Your Eyes to the Ground
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, July 16, 2009 - 07:17 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Keep Your Eyes to the Ground

Over the years I have been an avid metal detectorist frequenting local beaches and parks. One of the things I have noticed in that time, is that a third of the treasures I found of value, was without a metal detector. Many of the goodies were lying on top of the ground and perfectly visible before I got to them ahead of me.

The funny part is, even though I see objects on top of the ground frequently, and even when partially exposed in beach sand, I still swing the metal detector over them as if to verify they actually are metal detecting finds. Though this seems an odd practice, I know of other hobbyists who do the same thing. The methodology must be a psychological way of justifying the find even though the find was not
unearthed. Anyway, the point is, an awful lot of treasure could be found without a metal detector if one where to simply keep their eyes to the ground. I’ve, tried this and I know the fact to be true.

A short while ago I found myself in a park with some of my work colleagues. We met there at lunch to discuss some not so business like business. It was my boss’s idea to get into a casual, laid-back atmosphere to discuss plans for the next Christmas party.

Of course, I did not bring my metal detector to the park but my skills where with me. Instinctively, while walking by the children’s play area on the way to the meeting, I kept my eyes to the ground. Sure enough I found a gold necklace with a pendant partially exposed in the sand under the swings – and I
wasn’t even metal detecting – I was just walking to the meeting.

After finalizing the Christmas party plans with my co-workers at the pick-nick table, I made it a point to visually scan the rest of the park on the way back to my car. There was time left before I had to be back to the office and I did not have to make a beeline to the parking lot. The strategy worked and produced
a number of coins and also an inexpensive child’s watch. Viola! I had successfully gone treasure hunting during my lunch hour without a metal detector. I have had worse days when being serious, hunting with a metal detector when I had plenty of leisure time.

Treasure hunting with a metal detector obviously is the way to go but my point here is, you don’t always have to have one to find treasures. A good mindset for the hobby is sometimes all you need. So, if you get in a situation similar to the one I was in, where you are in a good location without a metal detector, it pays to keep your eyes to the ground. You’d be surprised what you might find. Try it sometime.



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Life's Little instructions
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, July 16, 2009 - 07:17 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Life's Little instructions


Sing in a choir. Plant flowers every spring. Have a Dog. Always accept an outstretched hand. Take Responsibility for every area of your life. Wave at kids on school Buses. Be there when people need you. Feed a stranger's expired parking meter · Don't expect life to be fair. Never underestimate the power of love. Drink champagne for no reason at all. Live your life as an exclamation, not in explanation. Don't be afraid to say, "I made a mistake. Don't be afraid to say, "I don't know". Compliment even small improvements. Keep your promises no matter what. Marry only for love. Rekindle old friendships. Count your blessings. Call your mother.



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HISTORY OF GOLD IN NEW ENGLAND
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, July 16, 2009 - 07:17 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

HISTORY OF GOLD IN NEW ENGLAND

New England has no mother lode similar to California. Rather, the gold in New England is found associated with quartz intrusions into country rock, often with the sulfide minerals of pyrite, chalcopyrite and galena. The gold was moved to the surface when metal bearing silica intrusions were forced up and into existing country rock. The material cooled into quartz, pyrite and other minerals. Much of the gold, with its lower melting point, was driven out of the cooling material into the nearby country rock. Recovery of the gold required the removal and processing of the quartz vein and country rock to a depth of several feet from the vein. Specimens of gold in quartz are very rare from New England but there are several specimens in museum and private collections. Another source of gold in the streams is from glacial deposits.

The mining was done by blasting with strong explosives which caused the loss of much of the flour and fine gold. Some of the gold that we find in streams today has worked its way into the streams from those operations. Mercury amalgamation was used in the early days to recover fine gold. Amalgamation occurs when the gold and mercury are mixed physically but not chemically. Gold will adhere and mix with mercury to form a milky white blob of paste called amalgam. The two metals attract each other and mercury will "catch" any clean gold that touches it. The gold was separated out of the amalgam with heat. Mercury vaporizes to a deadly gas at 605 degrees and gold melts at 1954 degrees F. Vaporizing the mercury leaves a spongy mass of gold that can be melted into an ingot. Mercury rejects gold that is not clean. Much fine gold released by blasting has bits of pyrite and other minerals attached, as well as soil.

These rejected pieces are also finding their way into streams, where the adhering material gets broken off by stream action.

We have recovered gold with pyrite attached and gold coated with mercury in the Wild Ammonoosuc River in New Hampshire. The mercury is a real danger to the ecology and finding it in our New England streams is upsetting. Anyone using mercury in a stream today is in violation of federal and state environmental protection laws. They are also risking their lives by exposure to mercury vapors.

The history of placer gold mining in New England goes back only to the early Nineteenth Century. In 1826 a 6.5 ounce nugget was found in the West River at Newfane, Vermont. The West and Rock Rivers in Newfane still produce gold for the recreational prospector. A true but small gold rush did occur in Vermont in 1855. Matthew Kennedy was a California 49er who returned home in the 1850's. While fishing in Buffalo Brook in Plymouth his eye caught a familiar glitter in the brook. It was a small gold nugget. Town records show that in one day in 1858 one of the claims produced $2,800 in gold from Buffalo Brook. By 1885 the search for new gold deposits was reaching its end. Two mining operations were started in that year in the little town north of Plymouth called Bridgewater. They were on Raymond Hill and Freetop Hill. Both mines were unprofitable and the gold rush was effectively over in Vermont. Today Buffalo Brook still produces gold for the recreational prospector. One of the gold mine sites, the Fox mine, is still there, next to the brook. All that is left is a trench cut into the hillside and a lot of milky quartz lying around. The mine had a 300 foot tunnel at its peak. It is on the left side of the brook going up stream just past the forth ford over the brook. I once acted as guide for a club trip to this spot by the old mine, with first time prospectors, and all had a successful and enjoyable trip. It is easy to get to and is in a beautiful setting. Many productive placer gold streams are in the north country of New Hampshire, along the western sections of the White Mountains and to the Canadian border. The area along route 302 from Bath to Littleton and north to the Gardner Range of small mountains produced several gold mines that were profitable during the second half of the Nineteenth Century. The gold was high quality, over 950 fine, with traces of silver. Yet silver is rare in New Hampshire. Today, the final five miles of the Wild Ammonoosuc River along route 112 in Swiftwater, New Hampshire, just up river from the confluence with the Ammonoosuc River, is a favorite of the recreational prospector. This roaring river moves gold during the spring thaw each year and each summer produces a new area for the prospector.

The river is so wild and turbulent during the spring thaw that large boulders are rolled over and can be heard to thud against each other. Another popular river is the Baker River along route 118 in Warren, New Hampshire. The picnic area on route 118 just north of Warren, between the road and the river, is at a bend in the river that offers many likely areas for gold. It is a scenic spot with all the beauty of the White Mountains.

The areas of Maine north and east of Rumford are the most visited areas for gold prospecting. The area around the Rangeley Mountains is not yet well explored but there are proven streams in the area. Maine has had a gold rush too, but a very short one in an unusual area. It happened along the sea coast, about half way between Portsmouth and Kennebunkport, in Perkins Cove at Ogunquit. It occurred during this century while engineers were dredging and pumping gravel to fill a parking lot when placer gold in small amounts came up through the dredge. The completed parking lot was the end of the gold rush of Maine, much to the sorrow of the recreational collectors in the area. The East Branch of the Swift River at Byron is an exceptionally productive stream that is currently getting state support as a recreational prospecting area.

Rhode Island has no placer gold deposits that I am aware of. A publication by the University Of Rhode Island, written by Clarence E Miller, reports that gold has been found at several places in the state and that there are still abandoned mine dumps available to the collector (as of 1972). The glaciers that dumped debris in the area scooped up that debris in Maine, New Hampshire and Canada. It seems only likely that the glaciers dropped placer gold somewhere in Rhode Island. Please let me know where.

Until recently Massachusetts had been listed as one of the states with no reported placer gold. There are now three streams that I have worked and found gold. Two of them are within a few miles of the Vermont border in an area of Vermont where Professor Hitchcock of Yale University reported placer gold in a state survey publication about a hundred years ago. They are close to Route 5 just before it crosses the Vermont border.

The third of these Massachusetts brooks is roughly north of Litchfield County, Connecticut. This area of Massachusetts may be the source of

the gold in the most reliable Connecticut gold bearing stream. Leadmine Brook in Harwinton, Connecticut, has placer gold and it is believed that some of it moved into the watershed during the big floods following two hurricanes that stalled in New England in the early 1950's. Placer gold has been reported in several streams in Litchfield County. Gold in Connecticut is rare and finding it requires a combination of skill and luck. There recently has been a report by a geology professor and his students of finding gold in a quartz sulfide vein in Cobalt on a field trip in Connecticut. But do not get excited, the gold is found in thin section specimens using an electron microscope at very high magnification.



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New England Gold
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, July 16, 2009 - 07:16 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

New England Gold

BUFFALO BROOK, PLYMOUTH, VT


This is the stream that started the 1855 Vermont gold rush. The gold is available in all sizes from flour to fair size nuggets. The brook crosses Bushwell Pond Road just past the Camp Plymouth State Park. Parking is available at the park. The Jeep trail up the hill by the brook is steep and it crosses the brook four times in shallow fords only several inches deep.

You will need tools for digging in gravel and working cracks in the stream bed. There are traverse cracks that trap gold that can be opened with a pry bar. It is a long steep climb so go easy on heavy tools. The brook was totally cleaned out by mining operations in the last century, yet each year there is gold to be found. The banks of the stream and the little side brooks are constantly replacing the gold.

Gold will be found anywhere in the brook. Below the Fox Gold Mine just past the forth ford of the brook seems to be the more productive area. The mine had two shafts, one 300 feet long. The mine today is simply a big trench into the slope. Mossing is not as productive as working the brook and cracks.

The area is shaded and has little open area. The brook is a favorite trout stream. It certainly is not suited for swimming. In places it runs a few inches deep in late summer.

Note! It’s against the law to use a dredge in Vermont & sluicing requires a permit.


Wild Ammonoosuc River, SWIFTWATER, NH

This is a productive river for gold, fishing, swimming and fun. The river parallels Route 112 from the corner of Route 302. There is placer gold to be found anywhere in the first five miles of the river. The gold here comes in any size from flour to nuggets of pennyweight size. If you cannot find gold here, you are doing something wrong. During the spring thaw this river carries the run off from a wide area of the western range of the White Mountains and it runs very wild. Water levels can be ten feet above the summer levels. This means mossing is good far from the summer water levels. The river offers many curves and bedrock ledges as well as boulders to trap gold. The gorge called Little Eddy is full of obstructions. The waterfall area by the bridge is not a good spot to work.

Tools needed will depend on your plans, the river has so many panning environments. Hardpan clay is under the gravel in many places, with gold sitting on the hardpan. Try digging in the water to hardpan and after panning it off I using diving goggles to examine the bottom for gold. Some areas are in the White Mountains Park and restrictions apply to prospecting. Hand tools are allowed at this time. Other areas are near private homes where permission is needed.

Note ! In New Hampshire, Permission is needed from land owner & a permit from the State is required for dredging, however a permit is not needed to sluice or pan.



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His Addiction Part 2
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, July 16, 2009 - 07:16 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

His Addiction Part 2
by Eunice Miller


I promised George the final part of this story on addictions so here it is! You may also suffer from it as well.

It started with a simple Gold Pan, and of course a shovel. We would pour through the articles on Gold Prospecting in our local area. These included books we had purchased while at Streeter’s.

Then we would leave early in the morning and look for bends in these rivers and streams and try to figure out where the most likely deposits of gold may land.

This is very hard work for two cripples to do. We watch the shows that tell us it is awesome exercise though and push through the pain in our search, for this elusive deposit here in NH.
So we locate a nice spot and he digs and we get a sample, oh I forgot, you also need a 5 gal bucket or two, wait and a screen, oh no what size?

So let’s see we have 3 buckets 2 gold pans, 5 screens we need to get down to the smallest of particles, for the Gold here in NH is this size, for the most part.

We work all day with one break but we have fun. Really we do love the outdoors, and the scenery along streams and rivers in NH are real beauties!

We screen his gravel he has dug out of the stream bed and look real hard at what we dump back into the stream and bring home only the small stuff with lots of black sand in it as we have been taught that this is also found in areas where GOLD is found.

A few small flecks are found! Well now we have to be able to move even more and take less dirt home with us(this they call concentrates)so now he says we need a Sluice!
We purchase a nice big one from a man in the Want-AD this keeps out cost down somewhat) and ready ourselves for some much better Gold the next time.
So now with buckets, screens, shovels and gold pans, oh and our new Sluice, we head to a potentially good section of our favorite stream bed!

We work just as hard but now we run the screened gravel over this new sluice and check the riffles often to see if we see any of that Yellow Gold! We do this once a week and still only small flakes are recovered on our trips to the streams.

Next step for him was to put together a high banker, we still shovel and then take home concentrates to pan at home.

He wants to go after the Gold easier so he starts to look for a dredge, because he feels he needs to go deeper, so he puts together a 2 1/2" dredge but he can not go deep enough!
I tease him about this and he says "You’ll see!"
We locate a man way up in Maine who has not 1, but 4, used dredges to choose from(gee he had this Gold Addiction BAD).
Ron loves the 6 inch but when I tell him in case he has forgotten, we are old and injured and this is awfully heavy looking and we will need a trailer just to get it from place to place he thinks about it and goes with this man’s 4" one.
He is excited and can hardly wait to use it so we try it up there in another of our favorite places.
It works great though I am not impressed with all the times good size rocks jam up the suction hose. He said not to worry as it comes with a metal rod you put inside the hose and it looses the rocks and we will be back at vacuuming the stream soon.


Now this dredge comes with a sluice box attached along with a gas motor, but it is missing the foot valve so it is horrible to start, I worry about him with all this pull starting and getting no where quickly!

Finally it starts when we fill every hose and we work for about an hour and then wash it down into a bucket but since we are now real tired and hurting badly, we decide to pan it out while we sit with a drink in one hand and relax in our comfortable chairs back home.
Well we work this dredge with State of NH Recreational Permits for a few years. We still can’t get deep enough though. We either can’t get where we want to because the roads washed away in a flood or the weather continues to be lousy but we try and try to find that deep pocket of gold just waiting to be found.
Now don’t forget, we also have all those metal detectors we use and hit the fields and beaches and ponds with, so with so much equipment and two old, crippled people using them we sometimes get so tired we don’t feel like doing anything.

Then we decide to take another trip to visit friends and family. We have to decide which equipment we will need bring.

Don’t get me wrong we still have lots of fun but no more gold then when we just went out with our shovel and gold pan!

So as you laugh at our problem be careful to watch yourselves, as addictions come on you without you even realizing it!

Happy Treasure Hunting to YOU ALL.



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Tips for Traveling Abroad
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, July 16, 2009 - 07:15 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Tips for Traveling Abroad

If you are traveling abroad here are the top 10 tips you need to make your trip easier:

Make sure you have a signed, valid passport and visas, if required. Also, before you go, fill in the emergency information page of your passport!  Read the Consular Information Sheets (and Public Announcements or Travel Warnings, if applicable) for the countries you plan to visit.

Familiarize yourself with local laws and customs of the countries to which you are traveling. Remember, the U.S. Constitution does not follow you! While in a foreign country, you are subject to its laws. Make 2 copies of your passport identification page. This will facilitate replacement if your passport is lost or stolen. Leave one copy at home with friends or relatives. Carry the other with you in a separate place from your passport. Leave a copy of your itinerary with family or friends at home so that you can be contacted in case of an emergency. Do not leave your luggage unattended in public areas. Do not accept packages from strangers.

Prior to your departure, you should register with the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate through the State Department’s travel registration website . Registration will make your presence and whereabouts known in case it is necessary to contact you in an emergency. In accordance with the Privacy Act, information on your welfare and whereabouts may not be released without your express authorization. Remember to leave a detailed itinerary and the numbers or copies of your passport or other citizenship documents with a friend or relative in the United States.

To avoid being a target of crime, try not to wear conspicuous clothing and expensive jewelry and do not carry excessive amounts of money or unnecessary credit cards. In order to avoid violating local laws, deal only with authorized agents when you exchange money or purchase art or antiques.

If you get into trouble, contact the nearest U.S. embassy.



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Eagle Times Printed the Gazette
Posted by: Webmaster on Friday, July 10, 2009 - 03:46 PM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Ever since the Treasure Hunters Gazette became newspaper style, it was printed by the Eagle Times In Claremont, NH. Without warning, the Eagle Times, went out of business July 9, 2009

With the help from friends, Streeter's made the Gazette, hand delivered each issue to be printed, to the Eagle Times in Claremont, NH (about 50 miles from my home).

The Eagle Times printed 5,000 copies for $378.25. Color pictures cost an additional $285. per issue & B & W pictures were cheap. The Gazette was then picked up by Bill & Barbara Barker of Keene, NH. They distributed 4,000 to businesses for $400. and the balance were delivered to me & I distributed via businesses & mailings for about $300.00. The only other people who get paid were writers, who promise to submit 6 articles for $100.00 and at some point most ended up writing for free.

Most articles in Gazette were from PTHHS members & supporters, NAPS or poorly written by myself.

We advertise we accept advertising, however rarely sell any.
Truthfully, we only sell about 100 subscriptions a year and the rest of the Gazette expenses are paid by Streeter Electronics.

Before issue #148 can be printed, we must find a new printer for the Gazette. If you know of a business that can print similar sizes of the Gazette, with weight of each, just under a ounce, please get a quote and send to me. George Streeter 307 Main St., Marlborough, NH 03455
603/876-4443, gstreeter@ne.rr.com

Best regards,
George "Sea Hunter" Streeter



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Hunting Virginia, Digging in Virginia VII & VIII
Posted by: gwatson on Saturday, April 04, 2009 - 04:41 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Hunting Virginia, Digging in Virginia VII & VIII
G.M. Doc Watson

I hadn’t realized how long it had been since I had written here for this web site; time had really gotten away from me, so I will go back and relate a couple of finds from the past two years.  In 2007 I was invited to attend two organized Civil War relic hunts here in Virginia; Digging in Virginia VII in March, and Digging in Virginia VIII in November.  For those of you not familiar with the Digging in Virginia (DIV) association, it is a small group of dedicated relic hunters who have been holding invitational relic hunts since 2003.  They research an area, secure permission from the landowner(s), and organize a three day relic hunt on the property.  Those invited to attend pay a fee, and this money is used to compensate the landowner for allowing access to their property.  Without such an arrangement, many sites would have continued to be off limits to detectorists.  More on DIV can be found on their web site, hosted on The Treasure Spot.

The hunt in April was a 2000 acre site Near Culpepper that contained part of the Battle of Brandy Station.  The soil in this part of Virginia is very mineralized, and my detector has its work cut out just to get a signal.  Despite these limitations, I still managed a few keepers.  My best finds were some bullets, artillery shell fragments, a gun tool, part of a fuse, and an iron piece I believe to be part of a horse bit.  The iron is twisted for decoration or strength, and is a little fancier than standard horse tack.

digginvga1.jpg

The bullets are .58 three ringers, .54 Sharps, a .58 round ball and a .44 pistol bullet

The second hunt in October was held on a site called Hansbrough Ridge, also near Culpeper, Virginia.  It saw troops from both sides during the war, with Union troops dug in and camped during the winter of 1863-64.  It was an amazing site to walk and take in.  Along the top of the ridge the depressions from the soldier’s huts could still be seen, most marked by small piles of stones, the remains of their fireplaces.  The area looked undisturbed for much of the past 142 years.  The first day of the hunt was the worst detecting day I could recall in thirty-five years detecting.  It rained hard for most of the day, conditions in which I normally would not even consider using a detector.  But then, what can you do when you only have three days to detect?  As it turned out, despite a rain cover and attempts to waterproof the control housing, my detector got wet.  I didn’t catch the problem right away, and spent the whole second day only digging iron.  On the third day I switched to my back-up detector and began digging bullets again.

digginvga2.jpg

Here are a carriage bolt, a miscellaneous iron piece I have yet to identify, horse and mule shoes, an iron key, pocket knife and several bullets.  A few are standard .58 three ringers, the smaller are .44 colt pistol bullets.  All are from the site of a Union Calvary camp.  I don’t usually keep dug horse shoes, since they could be from anything, but this site was different.  Because it was a wooded ridge top, and it had never been plowed or farmed, I knew that the shoes were indeed Civil War.  The up side of not finding a lot of the shiny brass stuff; I have perfected my use of electrolysis to clean and preserve iron.  If you know how bad dug iron looks, this was no better when found.  But, a few days of electrolysis and an iron preservative, they are now cleaned and sealed, and should stay this way for a long time.  Since I hadn’t dug much of anything else that year, I have been going back through some of the more interesting Colonial iron that I had found over the years and cleaning it up during the winter.  Most of it is not particularly valuable; actually it has little to NO value, but it’s old and I thought it would be worth keeping.  There is a lot of workmanship in those early iron pieces, and they are worth saving.  In all, the hunts were very enjoyable, seeing old friends and getting to see all of the relics that were uncovered.  While I remain a solo digger, a few times during the year I look forward to the camaraderie of a long detecting weekend with other relic hunters.  Good luck, and good digging.



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Revere Beach Hunt Finds
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, March 30, 2009 - 06:30 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

George,

Attached are pictures of what Tommy & I found at today's hunt.  We had a really good time today.  We look forward to the BONE hunts!  Thank you for organizing these hunts.

Tom & Tommy Daigle

reveretom3-29-09.JPG

reveretommy3-29-09.JPG



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Primm 2009 Hunts Notice
Posted by: Webmaster on Wednesday, March 04, 2009 - 12:28 PM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Hello Folks:  I have revised a section for our web site at www.AMDAONLINE.NET with the attached Notice that should be posted shortly.  The Notice states that we will NOT be holding hunts at the Primm 2009 GPAA Gold Show on April 25 and 26th, 2009, in Primm, Nevada.  Although, we won't be there, we encourage your attendance at the show which in years past has been a successful event for both the GPAA and AMDA.  Our Huntmaster reports that the field is hard-packed and without proper equipment and personnel, there is not time to prepare the ground for a hunt.  Also, Primm Resorts require a higher insurance premium to cover the hunters on the field, that we do not want to pay at this time.  

This cancelation does not involve any other hunts we may do in conjunction with the GPAA in the future or at any of their other scheduled sites for 2009.

If you have any further questions, please contact me at cgarrett71@hughes.net or by phone at:  (719) 749-0134.  As I have indicated in the Notice, Bernard is retiring March 15th giving him more time to work on plans for Laughlin 2009.  I will be periodically making updates to the web site and releasing soon a newsletter to members of news from around the country affecting our hobby.  I realize that some of you can not download my attachments, so for those who need a hard copy, please let me know and I will see that you get a copy.

Click to Read Notice

Thanks for listening,

Carolyn Garrett, AMDA's Chairperson



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Best O’ North East Recommended Metal Detecting Clubs
Posted by: Webmaster on Friday, February 06, 2009 - 04:58 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Best O’ North East Recommended Metal Detecting Clubs

Discovering Rhode Island Treasures, Gregory Wightman GSWIGHTMAN@AOL.COM or Arturo Rodriguez mmi.tesoro@gmail.com

Granite State Treasure Hunters Club, Concord, NH. Website www.gsthc.com/

Green Mountain Treasure Hunters Club, Inc., Rutland, VT. Info Harold Eaton, E-mail th_ing@cfraser.org

National Metal Detecting League, for details KeyblankJ@aol.com

Nutmeg Treasure Hunters , N Haven, CT website www.geocities.com/Area51/Comet/7671/

Professional Treasure Hunters Historical Society, Marlborough, NH. Shared website with Streeters www.streeter.org for info’ gstreeter@ne.rr.com

Yankee Territory Coinshooters in Hartford, CT. A great club with great leadership. For details contact David Gregorski dgrookie@sbcglobal.net

Yankee Treasure Hunters Club, (meets in Keene, NH) David Gaillardetz email dgailloo@yahoo.com



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Suzy’s Jokes
Posted by: Webmaster on Friday, February 06, 2009 - 04:58 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

Suzy’s Jokes

Exercise: I met someone in the elevator who was drinking coffee and complaining about how coffee made him nervous. I said why don't you quit drinking coffee. He said, "Because if I didn't have the shakes I wouldn't get any exercise at all."

A man is talking to the family doctor. "Doc, I think my wife's going deaf." The doctor answers, "Well, here's something you can try on her to test her hearing. Stand some distance away from her and ask her a question. If she doesn't answer, move a little closer and ask again. Keep repeating this until she answers. Then you'll be able to tell just how hard of hearing she really is." The man goes home and tries it out. He walks in the door and says, "Honey, what's for dinner?" He doesn't hear an answer, so he moves closer to her. "Honey, what's for dinner?" Still no answer. He repeats this several times, until he's standing just a few feet away from her.

Finally, she answers, "For the eleventh time, I said we're having MEATLOAF!"

Recently, I got to thinking about my first skydiving instructor. During class he would always take the time to answer any of our stupid first-timer questions. One guy asked, "If our chute doesn't open, and the reserve doesn't open, how long do we have until we hit the ground?" Our jumpmaster looked at him and in perfect deadpan and answered, "The rest of your life."

Medicare Coverage IN A NUTSHELL

The phone rings and the lady of the house answers, "Hello." "Mrs. Sanders, please."

"Speaking." "Mrs. Sanders, this is Doctor Jones at Saint Agnes Laboratory. When your husband's doctor sent his biopsy to the lab last week, a biopsy from another Mr. Sanders arrived as well. We are now uncertain which one belongs to your husband. Frankly, either way the results are not too good." "What do you mean?" Mrs. Sanders asked nervously.

"Well, one of the specimens tested positive for Alzheimer's and the other one tested positive for HIV. We can't tell which is which." "That's dreadful! Can you do the test again? questioned Mrs. Sanders. "Normally we can, but Medicare will only pay for these expensive tests one time." "Well, what am I supposed to do now?" "The folks at Medicare recommend that you drop your husband off somewhere in the middle of town. If he finds his way home, don't sleep with him."

A minister checking into a hotel asks the clerk: "I trust the porn channel in my room is disabled." "No," the clerk fires back. "It's regular porn, you sick bastard.'

Baptizing a Drunk

A man is stumbling through the woods, totally drunk, when he comes upon a preacher baptizing people in the river. He proceeds to walk into the water and subsequently bumps into the preacher. The preacher turns around and is almost overcome by the smell of alcohol, whereupon he asks the drunk, "Are you ready to find Jesus?" The drunk answers, "Yes, I am." So the preacher grabs him and dunks him in the water. He pulls him up and asks the drunk, "Brother have you found Jesus?" The drunk replies, "No, I haven't found Jesus." The preacher shocked at the answer, dunks him into the water again for a little longer. He again pulls him out of the water and asks again, "Have you found Jesus my brother?" The drunk again answers, "No, I haven't found Jesus." By this time the preacher is at his wits end and dunks the drunk in the water again -- - but this time holds him down for about 30 seconds and when he begins kicking his arms and legs he pulls him up. The preacher again asks the drunk, "For the love of God have you found Jesus?" The drunk wipes his eyes and catches his breath and says to the preacher, "Are you sure this is where he fell in?"

A champion jockey is about to enter an important race on a new horse. The horse's trainer meets him before the race and says, ''All you have to remember with this horse is that every time you approach a jump, you have to shout, 'ALLLLEEE OOOP!' really loudly in the horse's ear. Providing you do that, you'll be fine. ''The jockey thinks the trainer is mad but promises to shout the command. The race begins and they approach the first hurdle. The jockey ignores the trainer's ridiculous advice and the horse crashes straight through the center of the jump. They carry on and approach the second hurdle. The jockey, somewhat embarrassed, whispers 'Aleeee ooop' in the horse's ear. The same thing happens--the horse crashes straight through the center of the jump. At the third hurdle, the jockey thinks, ''It's no good, I'll have to do it,'' and yells, ''ALLLEEE OOOP!'' really loudly. Sure enough, the horse sails over the jump with no problems. This continues for the rest of the race, but due to the earlier problems the horse only finishes third. The trainer is fuming and asks the jockey what went wrong. The jockey replies, ''Nothing is wrong with me--it's this bloody horse. What is he--deaf or something?''
The trainer replies, ''Deaf?? Deaf?? He's not deaf--he's BLIND!''

An investment counselor decided to go out on her own. She was shrewd and diligent, so business kept coming in, and pretty soon she realized that she needed an in-house counsel. The investment banker began to interview young lawyers. "As I'm sure you can understand," she started off with one of the first applicants, "in a business like this, our personal integrity must be beyond question." She leaned forward. "Mr. Mayberry, are you an honest lawyer?" "Honest?" replied the job prospect. "Let me tell you something about honest. Why, I'm so honest that my father lent me $15,000 for my education, and I paid back every penny the minute I tried my very first case." "Impressive. And what sort of case was that?" asked the investment counselor.
The lawyer squirmed in his seat and admitted, "He sued me for the money."

Missing husband; A lady calls the police to report her husband is missing. The police arrive and ask for a description. She tells them he's 6 foot 2 inches tall, blonde wavy hair and has a smile that makes everybody love him.
The police then go to the next door neighbor to verify this report and the lady next door tells the police, "You can't believe her. He's 5 foot 4 inches tall, has no hair and he wears a perpetual frown on his face." The neighbor then goes and asks the lady why she gave the police such a false report. She replies, "Just because I reported him missing, doesn't mean I wanted him back!"

Exercise: I met someone in the elevator who was drinking coffee and complaining about how coffee made him nervous. I said why don't you quit drinking coffee. He said, "Because if I didn't have the shakes I wouldn't get any exercise at all."

A man walked into a health center and the receptionist asked him what he had. He said, "Shingles." So she told him to have a seat.
An hour later he got in to see the doctor who asked him what he had. He said, "Shingles." The doctor said, "Where?" He said, "Outside in the truck. Where do you want them?"

A man is talking to the family doctor. "Doc, I think my wife's going deaf." The doctor answers, "Well, here's something you can try on her to test her hearing. Stand some distance away from her and ask her a question. If she doesn't answer, move a little closer and ask again. Keep repeating this until she answers. Then you'll be able to tell just how hard of hearing she really is." The man goes home and tries it out. He walks in the door and says, "Honey, what's for dinner?" He doesn't hear an answer, so he moves closer to her. "Honey, what's for dinner?" Still no answer. He repeats this several times, until he's standing just a few feet away from her.

Finally, she answers, "For the eleventh time, I said we're having MEATLOAF!"

Recently, I got to thinking about my first skydiving instructor. During class he would always take the time to answer any of our stupid first-timer questions. One guy asked, "If our chute doesn't open, and the reserve doesn't open, how long do we have until we hit the ground?" Our jumpmaster looked at him and in perfect deadpan and answered, "The rest of your life."

Medicare Coverage IN A NUTSHELL

The phone rings and the lady of the house answers, "Hello." "Mrs. Sanders, please."

"Speaking." "Mrs. Sanders, this is Doctor Jones at Saint Agnes Laboratory. When your husband's doctor sent his biopsy to the lab last week, a biopsy from another Mr. Sanders arrived as well. We are now uncertain which one belongs to your husband. Frankly, either way the results are not too good." "What do you mean?" Mrs. Sanders asked nervously.

"Well, one of the specimens tested positive for Alzheimer's and the other one tested positive for HIV. We can't tell which is which." "That's dreadful! Can you do the test again? questioned Mrs. Sanders. "Normally we can, but Medicare will only pay for these expensive tests one time." "Well, what am I supposed to do now?" "The folks at Medicare recommend that you drop your husband off somewhere in the middle of town. If he finds his way home, don't sleep with him."

A wise schoolteacher sends this note to all parents on the first day of school: "If you promise not to believe everything your child says happens at school, I'll promise not to believe everything he says happens at home."

A champion jockey is about to enter an important race on a new horse. The horse's trainer meets him before the race and says, ''All you have to remember with this horse is that every time you approach a jump, you have to shout, 'ALLLLEEE OOOP!' really loudly in the horse's ear. Providing you do that, you'll be fine. ''The jockey thinks the trainer is mad but promises to shout the command. The race begins and they approach the first hurdle. The jockey ignores the trainer's ridiculous advice and the horse crashes straight through the center of the jump. They carry on and approach the second hurdle. The jockey, somewhat embarrassed, whispers 'Aleeee ooop' in the horse's ear. The same thing happens--the horse crashes straight through the center of the jump. At the third hurdle, the jockey thinks, ''It's no good, I'll have to do it,'' and yells, ''ALLLEEE OOOP!'' really loudly. Sure enough, the horse sails over the jump with no problems. This continues for the rest of the race, but due to the earlier problems the horse only finishes third. The trainer is fuming and asks the jockey what went wrong. The jockey replies, ''Nothing is wrong with me--it's this bloody horse. What is he--deaf or something?''
The trainer replies, ''Deaf?? Deaf?? He's not deaf--he's BLIND!''

Hospital Accident

An extremely modest man was in the hospital for a series of tests, the last of which had left his bodily systems extremely upset. Upon making several false alarm trips to the bathroom, he decided the latest episode was another and stayed put. He suddenly filled his bed with diarrhea and was embarrassed beyond his ability to remain rational. In a complete loss of composure he jumped out of bed, gathered up the bed sheets, and threw them out the hospital window. A drunk was walking by the hospital when the sheets landed on him. He started yelling, cursing, and swinging his arms violently trying to get the unknown things off, and ended up with the soiled sheets in a tangled pile at his feet. As the drunk stood there, unsteady on his feet, staring down at the sheets, a hospital security guard (barely containing his laughter) who had watched the whole incident walked up and asked, "What the heck is going on here! ?" The drunk, still staring down replied: "I think I just beat the crap out of a ghost!"

A blonde is walking down the street with her blouse open, exposing one of her breasts. A nearby policeman approaches her and remarks, "Ma'am, are you aware that I could cite you for indecent exposure?" "Why, officer?" asks the blonde. "Because your blouse is open and your breast is exposed." "Oh my goodness," exclaims the blonde, "I must have left my baby on the bus!"

A man came home from work one day to find his house in total mayhem. The children were outside, still in their pajamas, playing in the mud. Empty food boxes and wrappers were strewn across the yard. When he went inside, the mess was even worse. A lamp had been knocked over and the throw rug was wadded against the wall. The family room was strewn with toys and clothing. In the kitchen, dishes filled the sink, cereal had been spilled on the counter, dog food was spilled on the floor, a broken glass lay under the table and a small pile of sand was spread by the back door. He quickly headed up the stairs, stepping over more piles of clothes and toys to look for his wife. He was becoming worried that she may be ill or that something serious had happened. He found her in the bedroom, still curled in the bed in her pajamas, reading a book. She looked up at him, smiled, & asked how his day went. He looked at her, bewildered, & asked, "What happened here today?" She smiled. "You know how every day when you come home from work, you ask me what I do all day?" "Yes" he said, still quite baffled. "Well," she said "today I didn't do it."

Visiting the modern art museum, a lady turned to an attendant standing nearby. "This," she said, "I suppose, is one of those hideous representations you call modern art?" "No, Madam," replied the attendant. "That one's called a mirror."

A police officer, though scheduled for all-night duty at the station, was relieved of duty early and arrived home four hours ahead of schedule, at 2 in the morning. Not wanting to wake his wife, he undressed in the dark, crept into the bedroom and started to climb into bed. Just then, his wife sleepily sat up and said, "Mike, dearest, would you go down to the all-night drug store on the next block and get me some aspirin? I've got a splitting headache."
"Certainly, honey," he said, and feeling his way across the dark room, he got dressed and walked over to the drug store. As he arrived, the pharmacist looked up in surprise, "Say," said the druggist, "I know you - aren't you a policeman? Officer Fenwick, right?" "Yeah, so?" said the officer. "Well what the heck are you doing all dressed up like the Fire Chief?"

Heart Murmur An eighty-year-old man was having an annual physical. As the doctor was listening to his heart with the stethoscope, he began muttering, "Oh oh!" The man asked the doctor, "What's the problem?" "Well," said the doc, "you have a serious heart murmur. Do you smoke?" "No," replied the man. "Do you drink in excess?" "No." replied the man. "Do you have a sex life?" "Yes, I do!" "Well," said the doc, "I'm afraid with this heart murmur, you'll have to give up half your sex life. "Looking perplexed, the old man said, "Which half - the looking or the thinking?"

Two Wal-Mart greeters were sitting on a bench during break. One turns to the other asking, "Slim, I'm 73 years old and I'm just full of aches and pains. I know you are about my age. How do you feel?" Slim says, " I feel just like a new born babe." Rather amazed his co-worker repeats his statement in the form of a question, "Really? A new born babe???"
"Yup", grins Slim, " No teeth, No hair and I think I just wet my pants."

Share your joke w’ George 603-876-4443



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Coming Events
Posted by: Webmaster on Friday, January 30, 2009 - 02:31 PM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

February, Feb 22, 11:am For members and guests. Hampton Beach Hunt.. Provided a minimum of 10 reservations with payment is received. Make check payable to PTHHS & mail to 307 Main St., Marlborough, NH 03455..

March, 30, 11:am For members and guests. Open Revere Beach Hunt. Provided a minimum of 10 reservations with payment is received. Make check payable to PTHHS & mail to 307 Main St., Marlborough, NH 03455..

Both Beach Hunts have a $10 each cover charge & required reservations at least 2 weeks before hunt . Make check payable to PTHHS & mail to 307 Main St., Marlborough, NH 03455..

16th BONE National Raffle prizes 1 pound round & 10 oz Silver. For tickets contact Streeter 603/876-4443 or gstreeter@ne.rr.com.

April 25 NH Bob’s Spring Natural Hunt, an all day hunt on a Colonial site. Sponsored by NH Bob. More info 603/313-6300 and in Treasure Hunter's Gazette. and at www.northeastmetaldetectingforum.com

Sat. night, April 25, 2009, 7:00pm Get Together pot luck cookout. What to bring for food for pot luck!! If your last name begins with “A to G” bring chicken, steak, hotdogs, hamburgers, baked beans, or Chili, “H to O” bring a salad, a casserole or a surprise, and letters “P to Z” bring a dessert or a surprise. BONE will provide refreshments & condiments. COVER CHARGES = if you bring food to share, your cover charge is $5 each and if an adult & only bringing yourself & no food your cover charge is $15 each. Under 16 cover charge is $5 each. Advance tickets only and its asked, "everyone pays the cover charge before April 20, 2009. Mail pot luck cover charge to Pot Luck, c/o 307 Main St., Marlborough, NH 03455.

Sunday April 26, 2009, 8:30 to 3:00pm mini Treasure Hunters workshop at Post 24 Legion Hall, Rte 101, Marlborough, NH. Note! Please attend meeting on preserving the hobby. NOTE!! workshops held across a busy highway from the hunt fields. You must use extreme caution when crossing the highway. Streeter is trying to get people to set-up display booths, he asked reps from Garrett & Minelab for help & we also  wants metal detector, club, business & individual displays and maybe some workshops & an important meeting on saving the hobby. Helpers needed!! NOTICE extreme caution should be used when crossing Route 101 to get to the seeded hunts on Sunday. The hunt was once considered for a natural hunt

Sunday April 26, and  2 one hour seeded hunts, 9am & 1pm (limited entries), are in the field, across from Post 24, & across busy & dangerous Rte 101, Marlborough, NH

April 26, 2009 1:pm to 2:pm, BONE 16 National metal detector Hunt with 100s of buried old & silver coins, artifacts, relics, five tokens worth $100+ each and a drawing for paid hunters at end of hunt for a Minelab metal detector. (Hunt held in a field once considered for a natural hunt) $60 advance entry fee required by April 20, 2009 to National Hunt, c/o 307 Main St., Marlborough, NH 03455. Hunt location is across from Post 24 Legion Hall on bust Rte 101 in Marlborough, NH. Special!! both Sunday hunts $75 in advance.

Note! For proper planning we are requesting that hunt entry fees be paid before April 20, 2009, send to National Hunt, c/o 307 Main St., Marlborough, NH 03455.

What do you think? Send your thoughts to gstreeter@ne.rr.com or tel 1-603/876-4443

April 26 3:00pm drawing for BONE National raffle prizes at mini workshops.



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BITS AND MOSTLY PIECES
Posted by: Webmaster on Monday, January 05, 2009 - 06:54 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

BITS AND MOSTLY PIECES
By Don Foster

Warning for Minelab owners - do not let your dog borrow your detector. No matter what George Streeter says, they can't detect buried bones with one, therefore your dog must find something else to chew, check out them photos at www.streeter.org.

Although it's been rumored that our friend, Billy Mitchell from MA (that state should be bulldozed into the ocean for putting Barney Frank into office), can detect anything under 24 inches deep with his hi-tec, modified, almost illegal, Minelab, even dog bones. Billy's No. 1, as far as I'm concerned. I'm confident he could find gold in a landfill, in the dark, with a dead battery!

Our good west coast friend, Chris Valerio, and George are a close second. Privately we figure they usually bring 4-5 pieces of gold from home to increase their gold count on our trips. I'm hoping Chris received a new diamond tester for Christmas, with instruction on how to use it. Green is diamond, red is cz (private joke).

I have a plan to find more gold each trip than my detecting friends. I'm booking my trips alone!
Finally, my New Years Resolution. This year, with the help from all our friends, is to support our friend George, in losing lots of weight. I have to keep him healthy and alive forever, because it will probably take me that long to beat him in gold finds. Besides, George would no longer have to pay for two seats and half the aisle when flying. "Just Kidding, George!" We love you, no matter what.

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Foster Dogs 056.JPG




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His addiction, and how it started
Posted by: Webmaster on Saturday, December 27, 2008 - 05:47 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

His addiction, & how it started by Eunice Miller

My boyfriend started treasure hunting 20 years ago, on a hit and miss basis, searching for others’ lost treasure. His idea of what treasure was, pretty much is the same, but boy has his equipment changed.

When he started out it was like me, you find things like change or other free things in parking lots and places where people gathered. He bought a Radio Shack machine and when he had the time would use it to see what else he could find.

We found each other again after 30 years and he told me about this man George Streeter who had a cool shop in Keene. He said he wanted to go for a ride with me someday, and for me to meet him and for him to get a few things. A few things! Well we stayed for hours talking to George, I bet he was glad when we left!

Well he put his order in for a White's DFX. His dream machine! He had wanted this one from the first time he saw it at George's. It was a special at the time George told him. It came with a nice White's bag, to keep this machine in and a digging tool and OH Yeah a pin pointer! Don't these expensive machines tell you where it is? Why a pin pointer? Hang on I know, now..........

So we are off. Headed back to the coast where he can hardly wait to see how much more he can find with this top of the line White's machine. We had to stop and charge the batteries at home, boy another delay for him! He was excited with this purchase and wanted to use it now!

You know about treasure hunting if you are reading this short story, you know there will be times, many in fact that you get no more than change, dirty change to boot!

As we approached the sandy area of Hampton Beach, me with the digger, him with his new toy,'The Ultimate Machine' we decided on a direction to walk & as I walked beside him I could see how happy he was. To me that is all that has ever meant anything to me. I knew he went years in life, providing for others, ones who could care less about his feelings, only what this man could do for them. Well we are now together & all I care about now is him & his health & I mean overall health. We all need an outlet when in pain, as it is very depressing. So as we walked the beach together, where we had in fact gone on dates like I said so long ago, we began the search for goodies.

Well I can tell you it was accurate. When it said a penny and we found lots of them, and it said 4 inches I would scoop just the right amount of sand into our scoop and I could hear the coin banging on the sides telling me I had it! We wore aprons we bought from George and I would slide it into a pocket so as to not loose it and continue walking just out of the reach of his swing. When we would get to the end of our row we had decided on, he would then walk in my footprints as I would lay tracks beside him for the next row. We had a system for sure, others had just gone through with their machines but had missed the coin, we didn't.

I remember when he got a reading that said .50 cents, I looked up at him and said 'Ya Right!'. Well sure enough there were 2 quarters in my basket having dug down to the proper depth. This machine was good.

I loved the day we found our first silver ring. Oh!  It was my size, imagine that. We continued to use this machine almost daily and I mean daily. Winter, spring, summer and fall, we were out there. We got a lot of comments on how the two of us worked as a team, him swinging and me digging, the treasure his machine said was just laying there waiting to be found. Many men said they wished their wives would go with them I laughed and said 'Oh well that's why, I am just his girlfriend! ' No I understood how they must have felt having a hobby that the wives and kids could actually go with them and have fun doing and they chose to send them out alone. I saw them watch us and how excited we got when it was a ring and not a nickel.

We went everywhere with his detector. From northern Maine to Cape Cod. We even took it to Virginia Beach, when my Grandmother was not doing too good, so I could say goodbye. We were on the beach in a motel anyway so in the early morning hours as well as late at night this is where we were. We found a cool coin there on VA Beach so it will be a moment of our trip as well as treasure.

I remember calling George as we went to the Cape and found that they had made the beach a National Seashore where we were not allowed to metal detect. I asked him if he knew where we could go and he told us and then said always do the edges of land off limits, I believe his words were 'you can't fence it all in'. We found a ring that weekend as well, Wow, we were starting to get good at this detecting stuff. Slow and deliberate swings, with headphones on, puts him right on his target and of course I am always ready with the scoop to see what he found!

So now instead of HIS addiction, now it is OURS. He searches through the want ads for a machine for me you know just a cheap one easy to use, well he found an old Minelab a man had for sale 3 hours away (gas was not high like now) and we called and set up a time to go look at it. This man's Dad had died and he was selling lots of his beloved treasures. We picked up this Sovereign with no books or paperwork with a few other items and both of them were so happy. When we go home he charged it up and off we went to the beach, we never turn down a chance to go. Now remember, I thought I would use this one but no, Ron had to test it out first! Well he never uses his Ultimate machine anymore, well that's not true when we look in parking lots and the like, he does because it is so easy to see if it is a penny or quarter or jewelry. It has so many programs he doesn't even use and now with my trucking injuries I can not swing even this light one long enough to make it worth the trouble and the pain. I say SELL IT!
Well so now remember, we have gone from his $49 Radio Shack one to DFX and now a used Minelab to guess what? A used water machine. Yes you know the one! Another Minelab. He uses in the lakes, ponds and streams in search of rings and he finds them! This gets a lot of rest all winter but come warmer temps we hit the water for the newest drops left by visitors! All the while we keep track of the lost and found columns and see if anyone is searching for what we have found. That finishes the story when you can put owner back with their lost items.

Ok so now we have, what 4 machines and his addiction strikes again after that trip I wrote about to Stanton AZ last year for the 3 day dig and our stay out there. Well we really do need a machine to find the Gold Nuggets, but I thought a used Gold Bug out there in Wickenburg would have fit the bill, but no he had his heart once again set on a Minelab 3500. We called George Streeter once again and tried to place an order but he had bad news for him, it was not available so he just had to get the next best thing! Yes a 4000. I sure hope he finds a lot of gold this winter in NC, GA and of course AZ. Maybe just maybe his addiction is at it's worst! I have included a photo of him reading his new instruction booklet while setting his new machine up, now I will tell you this, when it comes to digging up the gold pieces I will once again be right beside him looking for the pieces the old timers out in the gold mine areas never found. I will dream of quartz laced with Gold, just like Ron will, with this new machine oh no I think I have caught his disease.

Well, we can grow old together happily chasing the nuggets and watching the smile on his face.



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Hunting an Old Homestead
Posted by: Webmaster on Saturday, December 27, 2008 - 05:47 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Hunting an Old Homestead by Ed Frulla

Doing research on the web for the towns in our area I discovered that the County Clerks office maintains an ATLAS of 1876 for the County and the towns. There is a town that borders the Hudson River to the west of the town we live in and there is a road that follows the river and the rail road tracks. My wife and I travel this road almost every weekend because we enjoy the scenery so much. The Atlas indicated that there was a school house located between the road and the tracks at a location that we were familiar with. When we got to the site it was apparent that the current road had been moved east closer to the tracks as we could see the remains of the original road up the hill and too our left. It suddenly dawned on us that we had parked the truck directly over the location of the old school house. Unfortunately, the school house was directly under the current paved road. We then decided to search a location a little further up the road where the atlas indicated that there had been two dwellings. A search of the site indicated numerous hits (hunting All Metal) but excavations to a depth of 8" turned up nothing. The cold weather finally got the best of us and we agreed to hunt the site next summer and to bring shovels this time. All in all it was a great time and we have a new place to research and hunt. I enjoy the research almost as much as I enjoy the hunting.



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My 1st Great Find
Posted by: Webmaster on Saturday, December 27, 2008 - 05:47 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

My 1st Great Find

November 20, 2008

I bought my X-Terra 50 metal detector on George Streeter’s recommendation from Streeters. I don’t have the time to go metal detecting as much as I would like and am still in the learning process of how it works and the different functions.

I have scoped out some old farm house properties that are close to my work and use my lunch time for metal detecting. I received permission from the owner’s to detect the property. I believe the properties date from 1790-1860. I have found by asking the land owner’s permission you make friends and learn a lot, not only about them but the history of the land. They become comfortable with you and even come out and visit with you to see if you found anything good. A lot of times they will tell you about other property that may have old findings; old cellar holes, etc.

I decided to search one of those older properties one afternoon on my lunch hour.

My lunch hour passes too fast. One day I wandered off my grid pattern & headed out into the middle of a big field, quite far from my car and close to the end of my lunch break. I was detecting at a fast walk pace back to my car, I was about 40 yards from the car when I received a loud signal (# 36) on my X-Terra 50. Now I knew that I was going to be late returning to work. I dug into the ground and pulled up the piece of metal that set my detector off. I wasn’t even sure what I had found until I returned to work. I washed it off and saw that it was a belt buckle; not sure how old it was but surmised that it was in the 1800’s.

Belt Plate 001.jpg

That evening when I got home I looked it up on the Internet and was shocked to find how old it really was. I got to thinking and thought maybe it was a reproduction. I called Streeter and told him what I found, he asked me to bring it over so he could take a look at it. When I arrived NH Bob was there, they both looked my buckle over and confirmed they felt it was the real thing; 1818-1835 Militia Belt Plate, belt loop and tongue in tact and in great condition. I was told it was worth more than $500.00. I went back to that same field every day at lunch time for another 2 weeks, without much luck. However I enjoyed each outing anyway. From the American Military Belt Plate book it is plate # 152. George took pictures & posted it at his website www.streeter.org .

Belt Plate 002.jpg 

What a lucky find and my first great find! They both congratulated me and George called me a name that we can’t print.

I really enjoy metal detecting and the anticipation of what is going to be found when it is pulled from the ground.

HAPPY HUNTING! Greg Patnode



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Recipes to Try
Posted by: Webmaster on Saturday, December 27, 2008 - 05:46 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Recipes to Try

Sweet Potato and Fish Chowder

Ingredients 55mins

1 tbsp Olive Oil
1 Onion, coarsely chopped
350g/12oz Sweet Potato, cut into 2.5cm/1 inch cubes
1 Carrot, chopped
1.1L/40fl.oz. Fresh Fish Stock
175g/6oz firm White Fish Fillets, cut into bite-size pieces
1 teasp freshly chopped Oregano
1/2 teasp freshly grated Nutmeg
120ml/4fl.oz. Single Cream

Freshly chopped coriander to garnish

Instructions

1. Heat the oil in medium saucepan, add the onion and sauté until softened.

2. Add the potato and carrot and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes then add the stock, bring to a boil, cover and simmer gently for 20 minutes or until the potato is cooked.

3. Allow the soup to cool a little then transfer to a blender or food processor and process until smooth.

4. Return the mixture to the pan, add the fish, oregano and nutmeg. Bring to a boil then reduce the heat, cover and simmer for 5 minutes or until fish is cooked.

5. Stir in the cream and continue to simmer, stirring all the time, until soup is heated through. Do not boil.

6. To serve - transfer to warmed soup bowls/plats and sprinkle with the chopped coriander. Serve hot.

Vegetable Roti

Ingredients

1.3kg/3lb Plain Flour

6 teasp Baking Powder

1 teasp Salt

450g/1lb Butter

480ml/16fl.oz. Water (approx)

Vegetable Oil

Instructions

1. Sift together the flour, baking powder and salt into a large mixing bowl.

2. Rub the butter into the flour mixture with your fingertips until it resembles fine breadcrumbs then slowly add the water and mix to form a dough.

3. Knead well and allow to stand for 30 minutes.

4. Knead the dough again then divide into 12 small balls. On a floured board, roll out each ball out as thinly as possible with a rolling pin.

5. Brush a large frying pan or flat griddle with oil and heat until hot. Cook the rotis for about 1-1/2 minutes on each side, brushing with a little vegetable oil as it cooks. Remove and drain on paper towels. Serve hot or cold as an additional accompaniment to meat stews or curries.

Bajan Beans

Serves 4

Ingredients

1 tbsp Vegetable Oil

1 medium Onion, chopped

1 Green Chili, deseeded and chopped

2 teasp Curry Powder

450ml/15fl.oz. Fresh Stock

100g/4oz Brown Rice

200g/7oz tinned Chopped Tomatoes

2 Courgettes (zucchini), chopped

½ Red Capsicum (sweet pepper), chopped

½ Green Capsicum (sweet pepper), chopped

1 x 400g/14oz tin Flageolet or Cannellini Beans

125g/5oz Sweetcorn Kernels (tinned or frozen)

2 tbsp freshly chopped Coriander

Instructions

1. Heat the oil in a saucepan, add the onion, chilies and curry powder and sauté until soft.

2. Add the rice, tomatoes and stock, mix well and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat, cover and simmer for 25 minutes, stirring from time to time.

3. Add the courgettes and peppers to the pan but don't stir them in yet, cover and cook for another 30 minutes, stirring 2 or 3 times.

4. Drain and rinse the beans then add to the pan together with the Sweetcorn . Mix well and cook gently for about 5-10 minutes.

5. To serve - stir in the coriander, transfer to a heated serving dish and serve immediately.

Fresh Coffee Ice Cream Recipe

Ingredients:
6 egg yolks
4 tablespoons fresh coffee (finely ground)
8 oz (200g) soft brown sugar (light)
1 pint (500ml) milk
6 fl. oz (approx 185ml) very hot water
Tip: Make sure you use good quality, fresh coffee
Take the finely ground coffee and pour the water onto it then let it stand for about 10 mins.


You then need to remove the coffee grounds so strain the mixture. In a heatproof bowl mix together the sugar and egg yolks, then whisk until thick and pale. Whisk in the milk and the coffee, then put the bowl over a saucepan of simmering (though not boiling) water. Cook until the mixture is thick (ie. until it forms a layer on the back of a wooden spoon) being sure to stir it all the time. Take the saucepan off the heat and place the bowl to one side to cool. NB. If you want to prevent a skin forming on the mixture you can try covering the surface with a piece of damp, greaseproof paper.

When cool, transfer the complete mixture into an ice cream maker and follow the manufacturer's instructions.

Corn Pone

1 cup whole grain cornmeal (or plain yellow)

1/2 teaspoon salt

2 tablespoons oil

1/2 cup water or milk

Mix all ingredients. Drop 1/4 of the batter into hot, oiled skillet. Flatten batter with a spoon or spatula. The batter will tend to break apart. With spatula push edge of cake to unite fragments. The batter handles very much like the mortar that bricklayers use when placing bricks and concrete blocks.
Fry until browned on both sides, about 2 minutes per side.

Eat as is or with a topping such as peanut butter, raw tahini, or apple butter. Or if you're heavy into sugar, you can use jam or syrup.

Peanut butter sauce:

3 tablespoons peanut butter

1 teaspoons soy sauce

1 tablespoon olive/vegetable oil

This sauce can be used on linguine, spaghetti or rice. Prepare the pasta according to directions on the package. Mix all the sauce ingredients together and stir until smooth. Spoon onto the pasta and toss or stir. Top with chopped, raw tomato if desired.
Makes enough sauce to season 4 large servings of pasta or rice. If you like, also add tomato sauce over the rice or pasta. Makes a good salad dressing on chopped green or red sweet peppers or chopped tomatoes.

Fall Salad

about 1/4-cup apple, diced to 1/4-inch pieces

about 1/4-cup cabbage, diced to 1/4-inch pieces

about 1/4-cup carrot, diced to 1/4-inch pieces

Just mix 'em. The tangy sweetness of the apple counters the pungent cabbage. The carrots add mildness, crunchiness, and color. Use slightly different proportions to get more or less sweetness, mildness, or sharpness.

As with any salad, you can substitute:
for the apple - banana, fresh pear, onion (chopped, microwaved);
for the cabbage - romaine lettuce, fresh parsley, collard greens, arugala, mache, mustard greens, spinach, fresh basil, kale, pesto (about 1 tablespoon);
for the carrot - red bell pepper, sweet potato, raw pumpkin.

A tablespoon of veg oil is optional. It will make the salad milder and may help with the absorption of some nutrients.

To make a main dish out of this salad, dump in 1/4 cup of whole wheat flour, 1/16 teaspoon (2 pinches) of salt, and finely diced rind from 1/16 of an orange. Use the optional 1 tablespoon of oil. It will moisten the flour. Stir until well mixed and no dry flour can be seen. I sometimes substitute raw, dry oatmeal for the flour, but then I'm particularly fond of oatmeal.

To make the main dish salad a complete meal, increase the amount of the fruit and vegetables:
1/2 of an apple

1/3 cup cabbage or 1 or so tablespoons pesto
2 or so cu. in. carrot

Go easy on the greens if you are not used to them. It doesn't take much to cause digestive system upset for some people. 1/4 to 1/3 cup chopped greens will make a large salad. Then add 1/8 cup or so of beans such as water-soaked or boiled black-eyed peas, split peas, or lentils. If desired add 1/4 cup of walnuts, sunflower seeds, flax meal, sesame seeds or almonds. The combination of grain, beans and seeds gives the dish enough protein and calories to keep you going. The vegetables are high in vitamins and other nutrients. The ingredient choices let you change the salad to keep it interesting. And it is quite tasty and satisfying.

Yummy Deep-Fried Twinkies

Makes 8 servings
Note about Twinkies:
The original Twinkie was create in 1930 and had a banana crème filling. Hostess changed it to vanilla during World War II due to a banana shortage.
8 individual cream-filled sponge cakes, such as Twinkies
1 ½ cups buttermilk
1 ½ tbs. oil plus additional for frying
1 ½ tsp. vanilla extract
1 ½ cups all-purpose flour, divided
1 tsp. baking powder
1 tsp. ground cinnamon
½ tsp. salt
Wooden skewers
Freeze sponge cakes at least 8 hours or overnight. In measuring cup whisk together buttermilk, 1 ½ tbs. oil and vanilla. In bowl combine 1 cup flour, baking powder, cinnamon and salt. Whisk buttermilk mixture into flour mixture until smooth. Refrigerate until ready to use.
Meanwhile, in deep pot heat 3” oil over high heat until very hot but not smoking, registering 350 degrees F on deep frying thermometer. Coat 1 frozen sponge cake in remaining flour. Insert skewer 1 ½” into sponge cake. Holding sponge cake by skewer dip into batter, using spoon to help cover.
Fry turning often, until golden brown, 3-4 minutes. Using second skewer to help, remove sponge cake from oil; drain on paper towels. Gently pull skewer out of sponge cake. Repeat with remaining sponge cakes, flour and batter.

Rainbow Glazed Popcorn
Makes 2 Quarts
8 cups popped popcorn
¼ cup butter or margarine
3 tablespoons light corn syrup
½ cup packed light brown sugar or granulated sugar
1 package (4-serving size) Jell-o Brand Gelatin, any flavor

Place popcorn in large bowl. Heat butter and syrup in small saucepan over low heat. Stir in brown sugar and gelatin; bring to a boil over medium heat. Reduce heat to low and gently simmer for 5 minutes. Pour syrup immediately over popcorn, tossing to coat well. Spread popcorn on aluminum foil-lined 15x10x1-inch pan, using two forks to spread evenly. Bake in pre-heated 300 degree oven for 10 minutes. Cool. Remove from pan and break into small pieces.
Rainbow Popcorn: Prepare Glazed Popcorn 3 times, using 3 different gelatin colors, such as strawberry, lemon and lime. Bake as directed and break into pieces. Layer 3 cups of each variety in 3-quart bowl. Serve remaining popcorn at another time. Makes 6 quarts.

Hush Puppy
1 cup corn meal
1 cup flour
1 tablespoon sugar
10 hot dogs
Wesson oil
Prepared mustard
Mix meal and flour together with sugar. Pour enough water in to make batter stiff enough to adhere to the hot dog. Roll the hot dog in batter and drop into a skillet of hot Wesson oil until brown. Serve with prepared mustard.

Very Best Blueberry Cobbler

"I've tinkered and tinkered, and this is the very best blueberry cobbler recipe I've found. Cakey/biscuit topping with a slight crunch on top and ooey gooey delicious blueberries hidden on the bottom. It can also work with other fruit fillings. Works best with delicious fresh blueberries and is the perfect summer treat.... An amalgamation of mine and my grandmother's cobbler recipe.... I think it is the best! Serve plain or with whipped cream. Enjoy!"

INGREDIENTS

2 1/2 cups fresh or frozen blueberries

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1/2 lemon, juiced

1 cup white sugar, or to taste

1/2 teaspoon all-purpose flour

1 tablespoon butter, melted

1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour

4 teaspoons baking powder

6 tablespoons white sugar

5 tablespoons butter

1 cup milk

2 teaspoons sugar

1 pinch ground cinnamon

DIRECTIONS

Lightly grease an 8 inch square baking dish. Place the blueberries into the baking dish, and mix with vanilla and lemon juice. Sprinkle with 1 cup of sugar and 1/2 teaspoon of flour, then stir in the tablespoon of melted butter. Set aside. In a medium bowl, stir together 1 3/4 cups of flour, baking powder, and 6 tablespoons sugar. Rub in the 5 tablespoons butter using your fingers, or cut in with a pastry blender until it is in small pieces. Make a well in the center, and quickly stir in the milk. Mix just until moistened. You should have a very thick batter, or very wet dough. You may need to add a splash more milk. Cover, and let batter rest for 10 minutes. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C). Spoon the batter over the blueberries, leaving only a few small holes for the berries to peek through. Mix together the cinnamon and 2 teaspoons sugar; sprinkle over the top. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes in the preheated oven, or until the top is golden brown. A knife inserted into the topping should come out clean - of course there will be blueberry syrup on the knife. Let cool until just warm before serving. This can store in the refrigerator for 2 days.



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Change is Coming...
Posted by: Webmaster on Saturday, December 27, 2008 - 05:46 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Change is Coming...

By Jules Razquin


I recently had the opportunity to attend a talk on cellar holes at the Harris Center in Hancock, NH. RonNH was there with me. I attended the talk, as I know Ron did, with a genuine interest on the research that others had (and still are carrying out) in order to locate and preserve these historical


A person may not knowingly and intentionally excavate, injure, destroy or alter an archaeological site or object from private lands in Oregon unless that activity is authorized by a permit issued pursuant to this rule.

In Oregon, a person such as you or me, would be required to obtain a permit to dig on privately owned land, even with the permission of that land's owner/s!

Wait, it gets better..

According to the Assistant State archaeologist of the State of Oregon, Susan Lynn White, an "official" archaeological site (such as mentioned in the Oregon Administrative Rule cited above), is a site that contains 10 or more artifacts that are 75 years or older located in a concentrated geographical area. This merits further exploration as to the definition of "concentrated geographical area"; the wording hints at a desperate and very vague attempt on behalf of individuals to classify and designate a specific area a historical site, yet ultimately effectively and lawfully negating access to it.

Oh, so you have a permit, huh? Where's your archaeologist?...
Once you have acquired a permit, it is your responsibility to arrange for an archaeologist to oversee and observe your excavation. By the way, you have to pay the archaeologist observing you. As a resident of Oregon, I'd have to wonder as to just what my tax dollars entitle me to.

That's what it's like in Oregon for people like you and me.

Clearly, there is an effort on behalf of some within the archaeological community here in New Hampshire to see that metal detecting comes to an end.

To have an item 75 years old, or older, classified as historic in North America is questionable, yet somewhat reasonable, considering that this nation's history is relatively young in comparison to other parts of the world. The term historic, or treasure, in places such as the UK applies to artifacts more than 300 years old, and with stipulations and conditions regarding their silver and/or gold content. Silllvar and Comcat (online forum names), who are contributors to the New England Metal Detecting Forum, and friends of mine, perhaps can further enlighten us, considering they have detected in the UK for many years, and have had to adhere to the laws and regulations there.

As of now, Federally, or State owned lands such as National Parks, or other such areas, are protected by law, and anyone attempting to metal detect on these is clearly in violation of the law, and punishable by such law/s. On the other side of this country, In Oregon, any individual metal detecting, or digging for bottles or any other historical artifact/s (as per the definition cited in the Oregon Administrative Rule above) without a permit (even on private land and with permission of the owner/s!) and without the observation of an archaeologist while doing so, is punishable by up to six months in jail. In Oregon, this is a Class B misdemeanor.

So, let's rewind to the part where cellar holes are historical resources, as per archaeologists, who insist that these should be off limits to metal detecting enthusiasts... Right now, there is a legitimate and worthy effort to locate and catalogue these features, finding them and including them in a State data base (as in New Hampshire - which is not to be made public!). Archaeologists lack the time and funding necessary to carry out a comprehensive search for and study of each and every cellar hole in existence. And this is why they are using the grassroots approach of talks and presentations to get communities to do the searching for and reporting of cellar holes' locations for them. To think that an archaeologist will be able to locate and excavate each and every cellar hole in New Hampshire within the next 10, 20, and even 50 years is unrealistic, and even naive. And yet they are sponsoring, and holding presentations such as the one I attended, pushing their views and attempting to convince people that people using metal detectors are out to loot, plunder, and destroy cellar holes. Perhaps they ought to scrutinize the practices of the logging industry, which according to my own observations, has inflicted destruction on an incredibly ridiculous scale to old roads, stone walls, and cellar holes. Need proof? I'll be more than happy to provide photos, and even a guided tour, if necessary.
On my time off work, I never once bumped into an archaeologist at a cellar hole on a weekend, or after 5pm. This is not meant as derogatory to their efforts or methods, but to note and underline the reality that very little, if anything, has been done to locate and excavate these features that dot the woods of New England along trails, roads, and highways.
Somehow, at some point, someone took the time to go where no archaeologist had gone before, and probably never will go.
Out of 28 cellar holes I have visited over the last three years, only one had not been previously detected or excavated. The hobby of metal detecting has been around for just over 30 years, so to think that you can find an untouched site to carry out excavation in this day and age such as a cellar hole borders on fantasy. Metal detecting enthusiasts have for years been using old maps and other resources to locate and excavate in and around old foundations. As much as it hurts for me to tell you archaeologists this, "too little, too late". As worthy as your cause is, and I know so because my grandfather was an archaeologist in South America, it is subject to question when it comes to how much you actually can achieve in the region of New England by restricting access to sites such as cellar holes, when you consider just how much has already left the ground.

So, when talking about what has already left the ground, this begs the question, where are all these relics today?

I've been at this for a mere three years. I know people who've been at it since the first metal detectors came out. Hobbies can, and will most often evolve into passions. Passions sometimes denote, entail, and evolve into selfishness. In short, a "I found it. It's mine" kind of attitude. This is the kind of attitude that fuels archaeologists' arguments as they attempt to substantiate their views and their call for a ban on metal detecting. Do not underestimate or misunderstand for one minute the effect that these people are having on others, many of whom are right now downloading and printing out "No Metal Detecting" signs to post on their properties, and encouraging their neighbors to do so as well. The countless relics and coins found and dug since the advent of metal detecting are scattered everywhere, in attics, drawers, and boxes. Have they been taken out of their historical context, such as archaeologists claim? For the most part, I'd agree, and say "yes". Perhaps one way we can go about bridging the existing chasm between metal detecting enthusiasts and the archaeological community is by performing more detailed recording of our finds, more effective methods of preservation, and sharing them with entities such a historical societies, and archaeological societies as well. This demands a lot more responsibility and discipline on our part, such as educating ourselves in the practices and methodology of the archaeological community, in order to contribute to the cause of locating, retrieving, and preserving bits and pieces of American history. In my opinion, we can contribute greatly to, and complement archaeology by direct and constant collaboration.

What has left the ground, has been saved from the onslaught of time and the elements. So, whether you're a property owner answering the door, only to find me (or any other metal detecting enthusiast/historical researcher) asking for your permission to detect on your land, or whether you're an archaeologist stating your case, the fact remains that were it not for individuals such as myself, a lot of history would be left to deteriorate. Forgotten and forsaken due to the bureaucracy and financial restrictions afflicting the archaeological community's intents and efforts.
The future of our hobby (passion is the word that applies to me, as I know the term applies to so many of you as well) lies in our ability to keep tabs on what happens on town and state levels. We may not be at the crossroads yet, but rest assured that the day will come when our activities and methods will be called into question, restricted and punishable by law. This may even happen without prior knowledge or notice, unless we keep our ears to the ground, and our eyes open. Maybe not in our time, but if your son or daughter enjoy metal detecting...

This is not a call to war, rather a call to awareness. But considering the existing negative and aggressive anti-detecting attitudes I have encountered and witnessed, I have to consider the philosophy that was ingrained in me through my military experience, which states: Hard training, easy combat.
Inform yourselves. Educate yourselves. If the archaeological community, our lawmakers, and our fellow citizens are allowed to cast a vote in our favor, or against us, on the issue of metal detecting, we must know so well in advance. If we can work with the archaeological community to enrich the experience and knowledge of generations to come through our passion and our skills, we must find out how to do so. Whether it be on a club level, or as groups of friends, we must somehow continue to stay in touch and informed on this issue, and be prepared to act accordingly in our best interest.

In the end, it is really in the best interest of our children, and our grandchildren. Not just for the sake of metal detecting, and our history, but as proof that laws may be slipped by, right under tax payers' noses, without prior public notice or consent. Jules Razquin



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Tips For Snagging A Cheap Travel Deal In Today's Economy
Posted by: Webmaster on Saturday, December 27, 2008 - 05:46 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Tips For Snagging A Cheap Travel Deal In Today's Economy

(NAPSI)-Frugal travelers, listen up: Prices for air travel are not that high these days and are in some cases actually lower than they were just six months ago. There are still plenty of great airfare deals available, so you can take that trip your family has been talking about. To find the best deal, you just have to be flexible and know where to look.

According to Travelnomics, a new report from Cheapflights.com, a Web site that helps people find cheap flight deals to destinations around the world, prices are just 4 percent higher than they were six month ago-even though airlines are actually paying 40 percent more for fuel. With data from the Bureau of Transportation Statistics, the U.S. Department of Transportation and analysis from industry experts, Cheapflights.com found that flying isn't as expensive as travelers think. You can still get a great deal!

"Good deals do exist; don't let today's gloom and doom news get you down and discourage you from taking that well-deserved vacation with your family," said bargain travel expert Carl Schwartz. "By taking the time to search for a deal, you will find something that works for you. Keeping your options open will go a long way toward finding something that makes everyone happy without breaking the bank."

Here are tips for finding the best airfare bargains in today's economy:

1) Be flexible on travel dates. The first flights of the day-along with flights on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Saturdays-generally tend to cost less than their evening or Monday/Thursday/Friday counterparts.

2) Consider alternate but similar destinations. For example, if you're looking for a warm coastal destination to simply relax poolside and drink cocktails, check out places such as the Dominican Republic or Puerto Rico, where the U.S. dollar is still strong and flights are generally less expensive, instead of pricier Caribbean destinations.

3) Check the one-way fares. In some cases, you can find a cheaper flight by booking two one- way tickets. This is usually the case if you aren't planning on staying more than three nights or are planning a Saturday night stay.

4) Sign up for multiple "deals" newsletters. The weekly "Trips and Tips" e-mail from Cheapflights, for example, has news and deals including cheap airfares, vacation packages, short breaks and hotel stays. You can find more money-saving advice online at www.cheapflights.com.



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Miners & Treasure Hunters Calendar
Posted by: Webmaster on Saturday, December 27, 2008 - 05:46 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Miners & Treasure Hunters Calendar

January 10-11, 2009, San Bernardino, CA

GPAA Gold and Treasure Show at National Orange Show, 689 South "E" St, Citrus Bldg. Call (800)551-9707 ext. 123 for details. Complimentary copies of ICMJ’s Prospecting and Mining Journal available.

January 16-18, 2009, Globe, Arizona

52nd Gila County Gem & Mineral Show at Gila County Fairgrounds, 3 miles north of Junction US 60-70. Info’ Andy Clark (928)473-3042 Complimentary copies of ICMJ’s Prospecting and Mining Journal available.

January 24-25, 2009, Fort Mojave, Arizona

GPAA Gold and Treasure Show at Mojave Crossing Events Center, 101 Aztec Rd. Call (800)551-9707 ext. 123 for details. Complimentary copies of ICMJ’s Prospecting and Mining Journal available.

February 14-15, 2009, Phoenix, Arizona

GPAA Gold and Treasure Show at the Arizona State Fairgrounds, 1826 W McDowell Rd, Phoenix, Arizona, AG 2. For info’ (800)551-9707 ext. 123. Complimentary copies of ICMJ’s Prospecting and Mining Journal available.

February 15, 2009, Phoenix, Arizona

FMDAC's 4th Annual Digging in the Desert Treasure Hunt at Arizona State Fairgrounds. details, Mike Smith (480)983-7011 or email: promack@quik.com

February 21-22, 2009, Fresno, California

GPAA Gold and Treasure Show at the Fresno Fairgrounds, 1121 S Chance Ave., Fresno, California, Commerce Bldg. Info’ 1 (800)551-9707 ext. 123. Complimentary copies of ICMJ’s Prospecting and Mining Journal available.

February 21-22, 2009, Monroe, Washington

Washington Prospectors Mining Association 14th Gold Gem & Mineral Show at Evergreen Fairgrounds. Info www.washington prospectors.org Complimentary copies of ICMJ’s Prospecting and Mining Journal available.

Feb.22 Hampton Beach, NH Beach Hunt at 11:am, by kids playground. Advance registration with $10 entry fee, required to Streeter 603/876-4443

Feb 28-Marc 1, 2009, San Francisco, CA

The Great San Francisco Crystal Fair at Fort Mason.

March 22 Revere Beach hunt on Revere Beach, MA. Meet 10:30am on beach in front State Police for the 11:am beach hunt. Advance registration with $10 entry fee, required to Streeter 603/876-4443



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Where to Find Gold in Alaska
Posted by: Webmaster on Saturday, December 27, 2008 - 05:46 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Where to Find Gold in Alaska

Bachelor Creek: Is 80 miles North of Fairbanks just past Montana Creek on the Steese Highway. There is a 4WD road that begins at the Dept of Transportation yard and goes around the fenced area. 4WD road not suitable for motor homes or most cars and you will go approximately 4 miles before reaching the mining area of the creek. No facilities available at the site. Area is open to gold panning, sluice boxes, rocker boxes, metal detectors and small suction dredges up to 6".

Caribou Creek in the Matanuska River Area (State Property): Access road located at mile 104 on the Glenn Highway. Turn onto 800ft long road at the 4'x5' billboard to parking area. Pans, sluices, detectors, and dredges. In 1991, the Alaska State legislature created the Chugach (National Forest): Located Between Hope and Seward. Almost all active creeks, streams, and rivers are open to pans, sluices, & dredges (4"). The Alaska Mining Association has written a new guide for the area.

Dalton Highway: Area on the "Haul Road" between Fairbanks/Prudhoe Bay. You can use: pan, pick, shovel, sluice box, rocker, metal detector. You can pan on any Federal stream segments along the Dalton highway south of Atigun Pass (mile 244) but no panning in the pipeline right-of-way (27 feet on either side of the pipeline) and no panning on Federal mining claims without the permission of the claimant.

Eagle, AK (City and State Property): Along American Creek & S. of Eagle, Fortymile Creek along the Taylor highway, and the many tributaries feeding the drainage's. This is the original Jack London country and home to one of the original gold strikes in Alaska.

Hatcher Pass Recreational Mining Area Located approximately 15 miles northeast of Wasilla off of Palmer-Fishook Road, with recreational mining allowed along the Little Susitna River and tributaries and also with the Independence Mine State Park. Gold panning, shovels, picks, and small suction dredges. Check with State Ranger on permitting requirements for small dredges.

Nome Beach Gold panning along the beach in Nome, Alaska. Panning is permitted on the beach east of Nome between town and the Fort Davis Roadhouse (2 miles). There is gold in the sands and it's yours to keep. Tour companies will also take you to various panning locales along the beach.

Nome Creek, White Mountain National Recreational Area: Is the largest area of this kind in Alaska. Gold pans, metal detectors, sluice boxes and rocker boxes only. It has a rich history of gold production and is easily accessible even with the super size motor homes that tourists bring to Alaska. A huge road project completed in 1997 made access to this area from the Steese Highway very easy. Road begins at 57.3 mile Steese Highway. The road is approximately 5 miles long from the Steese Highway to Nome Creek mining area. Restrooms (outhouses) available and camping areas too. The Steese Highway is paved only to mile 44.

And There are numerous other spots to pan for gold during a trip to Alaska. You might find a new spot or discover an old one just by panning for color when you stop along the highway. In addition to these public access areas for gold mining in Alaska, the state also offers a seemingly unlimited selection of commercial gold panning, sluicing, and mining operations, where a tourist can learn how to pan for gold. Many local visitor offices will be able to give specific advice on their local area. Some spots are better than other.



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White Cup Press Release: 11-08
Posted by: Webmaster on Saturday, December 27, 2008 - 05:45 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

White Cup Press Release: 11-08

(printed with permission from my friend Chris Valerio & his sister, Kim Farrell, who own & manage Coneheads, a popular coffee & ice cream business in Sequim, WA.)

Why pay so much for a cup of coffee? That is exactly what the owners of Coneheads in Sequim, WA, Chris Valerio and Kim Farrell are now wondering about.

Espresso has been thought of as a luxury drink and recently popularized in America by Starbucks Coffee. It is easy to charge a premium for luxury and coffee connoisseurs up till now, have been willing to pay sometimes well over $4.00 for a cup of Joe!

However, coffee habits may be changing and that can best be demonstrated with the recent entry of McDonalds Hamburgers into the luxury espresso business. Only McDonalds is dropping the price! Combine that with our current economic situation, along with Starbucks closing many of its retail stores nationwide and all of a sudden an expensive cup of coffee can make some consumers think twice!

In a poor economy many consumers must make some choices and luxury items such as custom espresso coffee drinks may be the first to go, resulting in fewer espresso drink sales at retail outlets. Purveyors of fine coffee espresso drinks can raise their prices to compensate for this loss of business, or simply hope for the best. When some customers at Coneheads started cutting back on their coffee consumption, invariably the reason given was a lack of funds for such an expensive daily luxury. Rather than play the price raising game to make up for lost sales and ingredient price hikes, Coneheads decided to take a Contrarian approach, by actually lowering espresso drink prices. In doing so, Coneheads hopes to help make quality espresso drinks an affordable luxury again.



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For Sale
Posted by: Webmaster on Wednesday, October 29, 2008 - 08:18 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

For Sale USED White’s 5900 D metal Detector w’ Pinpointing & ID $300 Streeters, Rte 101, Marlborough, NH 603/876-4443.

$100 off Garrett GTI 2500

Metal detector w’ Coin Hunter Special w’ Free Garrett Pro-Pointer, 4.5 inch Sniper Coil, Stereo headphones, meter cover, & a book & guide.

Streeter Electronics

307 Main St. (Rte 101), Marlborough, NH 603/876-4443

8 HORSE BRIGGS with 3x4 Keene pump. T80 compressor, foot valve, like new—$550. (520)326-8801.

4" DREDGE =Gold Nugget, Hookah air system, 5.5HP Honda, good condition—$1,400. Portland, OR (503)234-1980.

Lost something metal in the water ? Rent an underwater metal detector $50 a day @ Streeters, Rte 101, Marlborough, NH

 



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METAL DETECTING ETIQUETTE
Posted by: Webmaster on Wednesday, October 29, 2008 - 08:12 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

METAL DETECTING ETIQUETTE

1) Always have permission from landowner before searching land not your own..

2) No matter where you detect, city or private land, Always fill In your Holes neatly!!

3) If you carry it in, take it with you. Don't leave your soda pop cans, plastic wrappers, or any other trash behind.

4) Be extremely careful about fire!. The landowner and neighbors, livestock & wildlife in the area, are depending on you to make sure all campfires & smoking materials are out.

5) Here's a sticky point & one that has, unfortunately, cost a few friendships: If a friend takes you to one of his or her digging spots, it doesn't necessarily become your spot as well. Check with your friend, then the landowner, before going back to the spot alone --- & definitely check with them before you bring your friends to the spot as well.

6) I wish this were law rather than etiquette: Keep a careful record of the particulars of your finds. This record keeping will help maintain the artifacts' historical context, & the what & where of an excavated artifact is of great importance to future historical research.

In short: abide by the law, respect the landowner & his property, value the friendship of your fellow detectorist and maintain a careful record of your finds.



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Lost Ring
Posted by: Webmaster on Wednesday, October 29, 2008 - 08:06 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Lost Ring

Hi treasure hunters,

Don Tyler here to tell you about a lost ring find. On a Saturday in September, I received a registered letter from A doctor in the Dartmouth area. the doctor had lost a ring in a pond on a small island of shore while washing his dog. He tried by using a mask and snorkel with no results. He got in contact with someone that knew me but did not have my phone number .I gave the doctor A call and he asked me if I would accept the challenge, I said sure. Then he said when could you get here. I said I could leave in about ten minutes. I was just about to leave for the day to hunt anyway. It took over an hour to meet up with the doctor. I followed him to the pond and we put a nice wood canoe in the water and paddled out to the island. once there I noticed it was loaded with large rocks on the shoreline. To myself I thought, always come ready. I had my excal 1000 but not my 800 with the smaller coil {George Streeters favorite size coil} I entered the water and searched along with the doctor for about a 1/2 hr found a few coins and bottle caps I told the doctor I hope the ring did not fall between the large rocks. After doing the area I asked the doctor were he entered the water with the dog. I searched the very edge of the shoreline BINGO.I put the ring on my finger and as a joke ask the doctor to describe again the ring to me. Then he saw it on my finger. It's still a great rush to me seeing someone being so happy. Then we had lunch on the island. The ring was a custom made ring, something you dream about finding. But it's sometimes more rewarding, when giving back.



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Recipe Section
Posted by: Webmaster on Wednesday, October 29, 2008 - 08:01 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Recipe Section

Roast Bologna
Skin one 3 lb. bologna. Score surface to form diamond pattern. If desired insert a whole clove in each diamond. Place the bologna on rack in shallow roast pan. Bake in (350) oven for 1 hour and 30 minutes. Brush several times with pineapple juice or other fruit juice while baking.

Cottage Cheese Sticks
1 cup flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1 1/2 teaspoon celery seed
1 teaspoon caraway seed
6 Tablespoons butter
1/2 cup creamed cottage cheese.
1 Tablespoon Milk
Preheat oven to 425 degrees Lightly grease 2 cookie sheets.
Sift flour with salt and baking powder. Stir in celery and caraway seed.
Cut butter into mixture
Combine cottage cheese and milk. Add to the flour mixture stirring to form a soft dough. On alightly floured surface, divide dough into 12 parts. With palms, roll each part in pencil thin strips about 14" long. Cut in half . Bake 10 to 12 minutes or until golden. Remove to wire rack and cool. Makes 24.

Bing Cherry Salad Mold with Coke
1 can Bing Cherries
1 can crushed pineapple
1 package cherry Jell-O
1 package cream cheese - about 3 ounces
1 Coke
chopped nuts (about 1/3 cup)
Drain juice from fruit, add water to make one cup. Heat and dissolve Jell-O. Mash cream cheese and beat into Jell-O. Put into refrigerator. When starting to set, beat with egg beater. Add Coke, pineapple and nuts. Arrange cherries around the bottom of individual molds and pour mixture over all. Then return to the refrigerator.

Cold Cut Pie

"Make it ahead of time and be the coolest cook in town. An you need to complete the menu is a tossed salad or some sliced tomatoes, a basket of bread or rolls, a pitcher of ice tea and dill pickles."

Prepare the filling:
1 pound potatoes (about 3 medium)
1/3 cup vinegar
1 tablespoon prepared mustard
1 teaspoon seasoning salt
1/2 cup sliced celery
1/2 cup diced green pepper
1/4 cup minced onion
1/4 cup pickle relish
3 hard cooked eggs, diced
1/2 pound boiled ham or 1 can (12 oz.) luncheon meat, diced
1/2 pound salami, diced.
Cook the potatoes in boiling salted water until barely tender - still firm in the center
Meanwhile, combine remaining ingredients. Then potatoes are ready, peel, dice; add to filling mixture. Chill for 2 hours.
Fix the dressing and crust:
1 envelope unflavored gelatin
1/2 cup water
1 pound sliced bologna
1 cup mayonnaise
1/2 cup commercial sour cream
Place gelatin and water in small sauce pan and let stand two minutes, then heat to the boiling point, stirring until gelatin is dissolved. Remove from heat. While it cools a bit, line a ten inch pie plate with bologna, overlapping the slices. Now, using rotary beater, combine the gelatin mixture, mayonnaise, and sour cream. Chill till gelatin is just slightly thickened - about 20 minutes. Fold in filling mixture; spoon into bologna "crust". Chill at least 3 hours. (Store in refrigerator up to two days if you wish.) Serves six as a main dish.

Coffee Gel

Add one envelope unflavored gelatin to 1/4 cup cold coffee and let stand 5 minutes. Stir into 2 cups scalding hot coffee. Add 1/2 cups sugar and 1/2 teaspoon vanilla. Cool. Refrigerate about 4 hours or until firm. To serve, spoon into deep sherbet cups. Pour over each serving one tablespoon sweet cream or whipped cream.
"P.S. You can substitute Irish Whiskey for the vanilla (sometimes). Just any measurement will do.

Beef and Beans Barbecue

RECIPE INGREDIENTS:

1 lb. ground beef

1 clove garlic, minced

1/2 cup minced onion

1/4 cup diced green pepper

1/2 cup diced celery

1 tsp. dry mustard

1 tbsp. brown sugar

1/2 cup water

1 8-oz. can tomato sauce

1/4 tsp. thyme

2 tbsp. red wine vinegar

1 15-oz. can pork and beans

1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
2. In a large skillet, combine the beef and vegetables and cook until the beef is browned and the vegetables are soft.
3. Add the rest of the ingredients, except the pork and beans. Simmer 5 minutes.
4. Pour pork and beans into a casserole dish, and pour the cooked mixture over the beans.
5. Bake for about 45 minutes. Serve and enjoy!
Apple Cider Shake

2 c apple cider

2 c vanilla ice cream

2 tb honey

1/2 ts cinnamon

1/4 ts nutmeg

Blend all, except the nutmeg.
Pour into glasses.
Sprinkle nutmeg on top.
Garnish with cinnamon stick, if desired

Baklava

Ingredients

2 cups white sugar

2 cups water

1 cup honey

1 cinnamon stick

1/4 lemon

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 1/2 pounds chopped almonds

2 tablespoons white sugar

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon ground cloves

1 1/2 cups unsalted butter, melted

1 (16 ounce) package frozen phyllo pastry, thawed

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). In a saucepan over medium heat, combine 2 cups sugar, water, honey, cinnamon stick, lemon and vanilla. Bring to a boil, then simmer for 15 minutes, skimming any foam that is formed. Set side.

2. In a small bowl, combine chopped almonds, 2 tablespoons sugar, ground cinnamon and cloves; set aside. Brush butter on bottom of a 9x13 inch pan. Each sheet of phyllo dough is twice as big as the pan, so cut each in half, making 2 sheets. Place a sheet of phyllo on bottom of pan, and brush with melted butter. Repeat process for a total of 8 sheets, buttering each. Sprinkle about 1/4 to 1/3 cup of nut mixture evenly over the phyllo, and cover with 4 more sheets, buttering each. Continue sprinkling nuts after every 4 sheets of phyllo, until all but 8 sheets (4 full sheets) are used.

3. Use remaining 8 sheets for the top layer, buttering each sheet of phyllo. Before buttering the last sheet, tuck in any loose edges. Press down layers with palms of your hands. Pour remaining butter over the top. With a large knife, cut 5 strips lengthwise about 1/2 inch deep, then cut diagonally to form diamond shapes.

4. Bake in preheated oven for 50 to 60 minutes, or until golden brown. Remove from oven, and immediately pour syrup over baklava. Allow to cool thoroughly. Cut diamonds to go all the way through, and serve.

Khao Phat Sapparot (Stir Fried Rice and Pineapple) ข้าวผัดสับปะรด

This is an unusual recipe for Thai food because it is essentially a vegetarian dish - they are not common in Thailand, where even nominally vegetarian dishes often have quite a large amount of meat. This one has a little dried shrimp, and the true vegetarian could easily leave that out.

It is also unusual in that it is rather a theatrical dish: though the theatricality comes from a Thai habit of frugality, and perhaps a desire to have less dishes to wash!
For two people you need a medium size pineapple: choose carefully. It should be sweet and juicy.

1 pineapple
⅔ tablespoon chopped shallots, or purple onion
½ tablespoon grated ginger
about 4 to 5 red chiles, finely julienne
the green of 2 spring onions, coarsely chopped
about 1 tablespoon chopped cilantro
2 tablespoons dried shrimp
⅔ tablespoon garlic, coarsely chopped
1 to 2 tablespoons nam pla
1 teaspoon granulated sugar
2 cups cold, steamed rice and cilantro leaves as garnish

Cut the pineapple in half lengthwise, and scoop out the fruit (my wife uses a curved "grapefruit knife", but any knife will do...) then chop it into bite sized chunks. Put the fruit in a bowl and add the shallots, chili, ginger, scallion and coriander, mix and set aside. Add a pinch of salt to bring out the juice...

In a wok, heat about a tablespoon of oil, and stir fry the shrimp until crispy, and the oil is aromatic. Remove the shrimp with a slotted spoon and drain, then set aside. Add a further tablespoon of oil, and stir fry the garlic until golden brown. Add the rice, and stir thoroughly. Add the fish sauce and sugar, and continue stirring. When the rice is heated through, add the pineapple mixture and cooked shrimp, and stir until thoroughly heated through. Pour the mixture into the pineapple shells, garnish and serve.

Note:
If you prefer fried rice to be darkish brown in color, then replace half the fish sauce with dark sweet soy sauce.

Variation:
Do not cook the fruit mixture. Instead put the fruit mixture and the stir fried rice in the fridge (separately) and chill all the ingredients, then just before serving mix them and put them in the pineapple skins. If you are serving cold then you can also add a few maraschino cherries as garnish. This cold variant makes an excellent counterpoint to hot curries and spicy Chile dishes on a hot day (and it gets hot here I can assure you, with the shade temperature topping 40 Celsius on many a day)

Unusual Chicken Pie

Ingredients

3 cups cooked chicken, diced

1 baked pie shell

1 tsp. salt

1 1/2 cups celery, chopped

1 1/2 cups bread cubes

3/4 cup mayonnaise

1/4 tsp. butter flavoring

2 Tbsp. lemon juice

1 tsp. dry mustard

1 tsp. Worcestershire sauce

1 cup nuts (opt.)

Grated cheese

Directions

Prepare chicken. Bake pie shell. Combine chicken with remaining ingredients except cheese. Mix well. Spoon into pie shell. Sprinkle top with cheese. Bake at 350 degrees F for about 40 minutes or until hot through and cheese is bubbly on top.

Cold Cucumber & Mint Soup
Ingredients:
3 small cucumbers, peeled
1/3 cup chopped chives
1/3 cup mint leaves
2 large cloves, peeled and mashed
1 cup chicken broth
½ teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon white wine vinegar
freshly ground pepper
1 Anaheim Chile pepper
16 ounces of plain yogurt

Put all the ingredients into a food processor or blender. Process until smooth.
Whisk in the yogurt. Chill thoroughly and serve with choice of toppings like:
Chopped tomatoes, chive blossoms, minced arugula and croutons.
Yield: 4 servings

Minty Peach and Pepper Relish
A refreshing side dish!
Ingredients:
2 good sized ripe peaches
1 tablespoon fresh spearmint, chopped
2 tablespoons good, fruity olive oil
2 tablespoons of fresh lemon basil, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 cup roasted sweet Italian peppers, cut into 1/2 inch pieces
1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar

Cut the peaches in half and remove the pits. Fire up the grill. Combine olive oil, lemon basil, mint and garlic. Rub the cut side of peaches with half of the oil/spice mixture. Grill the peaches 2 minutes or so with their cut side down just until they have a golden color. Put them on a rack to cool.
Chop the cooled peaches and combine with the peppers, cider vinegar and remaining oil mixture in a bowl. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Toss and serve.

Pickled Green Tomatoes
Hey home canners: This is a wonderful way to preserve all your green tomatoes before the first frost turns them to mush. A real treat in the middle of winter when you are planning next season's garden.
Ingredients:
9 or so lbs. green tomatoes
2 cups thinly sliced red & white onions
!/2 cup celery sliced 1/4 inch thick crosswise
1/4 cup canning salt
2 cups brown sugar
4 cups white vinegar (5% acidity)
1 tablespoon each mustard seed, allspice, celery seed and whole cloves


Wash and slice tomatoes 1/4 inch thick. Layer them in a glass bowl with the onions, sprinkling with the salt as you add layers. Let this stand at room temp for 4 to 6 hours. Then drain well.
Heat the vinegar and stir until completely dissolved. Put the mustard seed, allspice, celery seed, and cloves in a square of cheesecloth tying up the top. Add to the vinegar with tomatoes and onions. If necessary add just enough water to cover the ingredients. Bring to boil and simmer 30 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent burning and sticking. Tomatoes will be tender and transparent when properly cooked. Remove the spices and proceed to canning.

Fill sterile jars and cover with hot pickling solution, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process in a boiling water bath: Pints - 15 minutes at 6,000 feet or below, 20 minutes above 6,000 feet; Quarts - 20 minutes at 6,000 feet or below, 25 minutes above 6,000 feet.
Note: Letting the pickles mellow for a few weeks vastly improves the flavor...if you can resist. Yield: approximately 7 pints



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SUZY JOKES
Posted by: Webmaster on Wednesday, October 29, 2008 - 07:59 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

SUZY JOKES

A teacher was giving a lesson on the circulation of the blood. Trying to make the matter clearer, she said, "Now, class, if I stood on my head, the blood, as you know, would run into it, and I would turn red in the face." "Yes," the class said. "Then why is it that while I am standing upright in the ordinary position the blood doesn't run into my feet?" A little fellow shouted, "Cause your feet ain't empty."

Another Word for Danger

As a stranger entered a little country store, he noticed a sign warning, "Danger! Beware of dog!" posted on the glass door. Inside, he noticed a harmless old hound dog asleep on the floor beside the cash register. "Is that the dog folks are supposed to beware of?" he asked the owner. "Yep, that's him," came the reply. The stranger couldn't help but be amused. "That certainly doesn't look like a dangerous dog to me. Why in the world would you post that sign?" "Because," the owner explained, "Before I posted that sign, people kept tripping over him!"

Senior Moments

1. The nicest thing about the future is it always starts tomorrow. 2. Money will buy a fine dog but only kindness will make him wag his tail.
3. If you don't have a sense of humor, you probably don't have any sense at all. 4. Seat belts are not as confining as wheelchairs.
5. A good time to keep your mouth shut is when you're in deep water. 6.. How come it takes so little time for a child who is afraid of the dark to become a teenager who wants to stay out all night? 7. Business conventions are important because they demonstrate how many people a company can operate without.
8. Why is it that, at class reunions, you feel younger than everyone else looks? 9. Scratch a dog and you'll find a permanent job. 10. No one has more driving ambition than the boy who wants to buy a car. 11. There are no new sins; the old ones just get more publicity.
12. There are worse things than getting a call for a wrong number at 4AM: It could be a right number. 13. No one ever says "It's only a game" when their team's winning. 14. I've reached the age where the happy hour is a nap. 15. Be careful reading the fine print. There's no way you're going to like it.
16. The trouble with bucket seats is not everybody has the same size bucket. 17. Do you realize in about 40 years we'll have millions of old ladies running around with tattoos? (And rap music will be the Golden Oldies!) 18. After 70 if you don't wake up aching in every joint, you are probably dead.

Blind Golfers. A pastor, a doctor and an engineer were waiting one morning for a particularly slow group of golfers. The engineer fumed, "What's with these guys? We must have been waiting for 15 minutes!" The doctor chimed in, "I don't know, but I've never seen such ineptitude! "The pastor said, "Hey, here comes the greens keeper. Let's have a word with him." "Hi, George. Say, what's with that group ahead of us? They're rather slow, aren't they?" The greens keeper replied, "Oh, yes, that's a group of blind firefighters. They lost their sight saving our clubhouse from a fire last year, so we always let them play for free anytime." The group was silent for a moment. The pastor said, "That's so sad. I think I will say a special prayer for them tonight." The doctor said, "Good idea. And I'm going to contact my ophthalmologist buddy and see if there's anything he can do for them." The engineer said, "Why can't these guys play at night?"

Area 51. You've heard of the Air Force's ultra-high-security, super-secret base in Nevada, known simply as "Area 51?" Well, late one afternoon, the Air Force folks out at Area 51 were surprised to see a Cessna landing at their "secret" base. They immediately impounded the aircraft and hauled the pilot into an interrogation room. The pilot's story was that he took off from Vegas, got lost, and spotted the Base just as he was about to run out of fuel. The Air Force started a full FBI background check on the pilot and held him overnight during the investigation. By the next day, they were finally convinced that the pilot really was lost and wasn't a spy. They gassed up his airplane, gave him a terrifying "you-did-not-see-a-base" briefing, complete with threats of spending the rest of his life in prison, told him Vegas was that-a-way on such-and-such a heading, and sent him on his way. The next day, to the total disbelief of the Air Force, the same Cessna showed up again. Once again, the MP's surrounded the plane... only this time there were two people in the plane. The same pilot jumped out and said, "Do anything you want to me, but my wife is in the plane and you have to tell her where I was last night!"

All out. Two men are occupying booths in a public restroom, when one calls to the other, "There is no toilet paper over here--do you have any over there?" The second man replies, "No, sorry, I don't seem to have any, either." The first man then asks, "Well, do you have a magazine or newspaper?" The second man says, "No, sorry!" The first man pauses, then inquires, "Do you have change for a twenty?"

Mounted Cop. There was a cop on his horse waiting to cross the road when a little boy on his new shiny bike stopped beside him. ''Nice bike,'' the cop said, ''did Santa bring it to you?'' ''Yep,'' the little boy said, ''he sure did!'' The cop looked at the bike and while handing the boy a $20 ticket he said, ''Next year, tell Santa to put a license plate on the back of it.'' To go along with the cop, the little boy said, ''Nice horse you got there sir, did Santa bring it to you?'' ''Yes, He sure did,'' said the cop. The little boy looked up at the cop and said, ''Next year tell Santa to put the dick underneath the horse instead of on top.''

Cart wheeling for Cash . One day a little girl came running into her house yelling, "Mommy, I got five dollars!" The mother was curious, so she asked her child where she got the five dollars from. The little girl replied, ''Tommy down the street gave me five dollars for doing cartwheel while he sat in the tree. The mother told her daughter, "Don't you know that Tommy is just trying to see your panties." ''OOOOhhhh'' said the little girl. The next day the little girl came running into the house yelling, "Mommy, I got ten dollars. The mother asked, "Where did you get the ten dollars from?" The little girl replied, "Tommy down the street gave me ten dollars for doing a cartwheel while he sat up in the tree and laughed." The mother replied, "Didn't I tell you that he is...'' Before the mother could finish, the little girl said, ''Wait Mommy. I tricked him, I didn't wear any panties today.''

Sunday School. Little Mary was not the best student in Sunday School. Usually she slept through the class. One day the teacher called on her while she was napping, ''Tell me, Mary, who created the universe?'' When Mary didn't stir, little Johnny, an altruistic boy seated in the chair behind her, took a pin and jabbed her in the rear. ''God Almighty !'' shouted Mary and the teacher said, ''Very good'' and Mary fell back to sleep. A while later the teacher asked Mary, ''Who is our Lord and Savior?'' But Mary didn't even stir from her slumber. Once again, Johnny came to the rescue and stuck her again. ''Jesus Christ!'' shouted Mary and the teacher said, ''Very good,'' and Mary fell back to sleep. Then the teacher asked Mary a third question, ''What did Eve say to Adam after she had her twenty-third child?'' And again, Johnny jabbed her with the pin. This time Mary jumped up and shouted, ''If you stick that damn thing in me one more time, I'll break it in half!'' The Teacher fainted.

Great Idea. I have come up with the ultimate solution to the earth's environmental concerns. Let's gather up all of the landfill wastes, industrial wastes, nuclear wastes, hazardous wastes, and biomedical wastes and deposit them in some small savings and loan. Then, suddenly they will disappear.

As an airplane is about to crash, a female passenger jumps up frantically and announces, "If I'm going to die, I want to die feeling like a woman." She removes all her clothing and asks, "Is there someone on this plane who is man enough to make me feel like a woman?" A man stands up, removes his shirt and says, "Here, iron this!".

The new employee stood before the paper shredder looking confused. "Need some help?" a secretary, walking by, asked.

"Yes," he replied, "how does this thing work?" "Simple," she said, taking the fat report from his hand and feeding it into the shredder.

"Thanks, but where do the copies come out?"

Three nuns were talking. The first nun said, "I was cleaning in Father's room the other day and do you know what I found? A bunch of pornographic magazines." "What did you do?" the other nuns asked. "Well, of course I threw them in the trash." The second nun said, "Well, I can top that. I was in Father's room putting away the laundry and I found a bunch of condoms!" "Oh my!" gasped the other nuns. "What did you do?" they asked. "I poked holes in all of them!" she replied. The third nun fainted.

A young man finds the woman of his dreams and asks her to marry him. He tells his mother he wants her to meet his fiancé, but he wants to make a bit of a game out of it. He says he'll bring the girl over with two other women and see if his mother can guess which is the one he wants to marry. His mother agrees to the game. That night, he shows up at his mother's house with three beautiful young ladies. They all sit down on the couch, and everyone has a wonderful evening talking and getting to know each other. At the end of the evening, the young man asks his mother, 'OK, Mom, which one is the woman I want to marry?' Without any hesitation at all, his mother replies, 'The one in the middle.' The

man is astounded. 'How in the world did you figure it out?' 'Easy,' she says. 'I don't like her.'
Two rednecks were looking at a Sears catalog and admiring the models. One says to the other, 'Have you seen the beautiful girls in this catalog?' The second one replies, 'Yes, they are very beautiful. And look at the price!' The first one says, with wide eyes, 'Wow, they aren't very expensive. At this price, I'm buying one.' The second one smiles and pats him on the back. 'Good idea! Order one and if she's as beautiful as she is in the catalog, I will get one too.' Three weeks later, the youngest redneck asks his friend, 'Did you ever receive the girl you ordered from the Sears catalog?' The second redneck replies, 'No, but it shouldn't be long now. I got her clothes yesterday!'

A man was driving down a country road one day at 45 MPH when suddenly he noticed a 3-legged turkey running at the same speed beside his truck. Though he thought this odd, the man decided to speed up so he wouldn't cause an accident with the turkey. The man sped up to 55 miles per hour, but low and behold, so did the 3-legged turkey. The man then sped up to 65 miles per hour only to again be equaled in speed by the 3-legged turkey. As the man watched in amazement, the turkey suddenly made a sharp left turn and took off down a side road toward a small farm. The man quickly also made the left turn and followed the turkey to the small farm, parking out front.
Looking around the man found the farmer around back in the midst of many 3-legged turkeys. After greeting the farmer, the man asked him why he was raising 3-legged turkeys. "Well we figure," said the farmer, "that with an average family of 3 people, only 2 can have a turkey leg with an average turkey. But with a three legged turkey, each member of the family can enjoy a turkey leg for of their own on Thanksgiving." "That's pretty wise," said the man, who then asked "Well how do your 3-legged turkeys taste?" I don't know," said the farmer. "We've never been able to catch one."

Jacob, age 92, and Rebecca, age 89, are all excited about their decision to get married. They go for a stroll to discuss the wedding and on the way they pass a drugstore. Jacob suggests they go in. Jacob addresses the man behind the counter: 'Are you the owner?' The pharmacist answers yes. Says Jacob: 'We're about to get married. Do you sell heart medication?' Pharmacist: 'Of course we do.'
Jacob: 'How about medicine for circulation?'
Pharmacist: 'All kinds.' Jacob: 'Medicine for rheumatism, scoliosis?' Pharmacist: 'Definitely.' Jacob: 'How about Viagra?'
Pharmacist: 'Of course. 'Jacob: 'Medicine for memory problems, arthritis, jaundice?'
Pharmacist: 'Yes, a large variety. The works.'
Jacob: 'What about vitamins, sleeping pills, Geritol, antidotes for Parkinson's disease?'
Pharmacist: 'Absolutely. 'Jacob: 'You sell wheelchairs and walkers?' Pharmacist: 'All speeds and sizes 'Jacob says to the pharmacist: 'We'd like to register here for our wedding gifts, please.'

While enjoying an early morning breakfast in a northern Arizona cafe, four elderly ranchers were discussing everything from cattle, horses, and weather, to how things used to be in the "good old days. "Eventually the conversation moved on to their spouses. One gentleman turned to the fellow on his right and asked, "Roy, aren't you and your bride celebrating your fiftieth wedding anniversary soon?" "Yup, we sure are," Roy replied. "Well, are you gonna do anything special to celebrate?" another man asked. The old gentleman pondered this for a moment, then replied, "For our twenty-fifth anniversary, I took Bea to Tucson. Maybe for our fiftieth, I'll go down there and get her."

On their 50th wedding anniversary & during the banquet celebrating it, Tom was asked to give his friends a brief account of the benefits of a marriage of such long duration. "Tell us Tom, just what is it you have learned from all those wonderful years with your wife?" Tom responds, "Well, I've learned that marriage is the best teacher of all. It teaches you loyalty, meekness, forbearance, self-restraint, forgiveness -- and a great many other qualities you wouldn't have needed if you'd stayed single."

To be happy with a man, you must understand him a lot and love him a little. To be happy with a woman, you must love her a lot and not try to understand her at all.

A couple had been married for 40 years and also celebrated their 60th birthdays.
During the celebration, a fairy appeared and said that because they had been such a loving couple all these years, she would give them one wish each. Being the faithful, loving spouse for all these years, naturally the wife wanted for herself and her husband to have a romantic vacation together, so she wished for them to travel around the world. The fairy waved her wand and boom! The wife had the tickets in her hand. Next, it was the husband's turn and the fairy assured him he could have any wish he wanted, all he needed to do was ask for his heart's desire. He paused for a moment, and then said, "Well, honestly, I'd like to have a woman 30 years younger than me."
The fairy picked up her wand and kazoom! The husband turned 90! The foolish man forgot that all fairies are WOMEN!



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The Old Prospector's Page
Posted by: Webmaster on Wednesday, October 29, 2008 - 07:56 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

The Old Prospector's Page

Streeter’s
Treasure Hunting Supply,
Treasure Hunter’s Gazette & George Streeter
307 Main St (Rte 101) Marlborough, NH
603/876-4443
gstreeter@ne.rr.com

website www.streeter.org


If you don't know where you're going, you probably won't get there.


WE MUST ALL WORK TO LIVE, HOWEVER, WE SHOULD MAKE EVERY EFFORT TO AVOID LIVING TO WORK.


Best Prospecting magazine

http://www.icmj.com/

International California Gold Mining Journal & editor Scott Harn, was voted Best Prospecting magazine of year at the last 7 BONE award banquets.

Miners Calendar

From ICMJ—Miner's Calendar

PO Box 2260, Aptos, CA 95001-2260Anchorage, Alaska, Nov. 3-9, 2008,

Alaska Miners General Convention. 3 short courses held on Nov. 3-4; Annual Rock and Mineral Show will be Nov. 7-9. Phone: E-mail: ama@alaskaminers.org; Web: Complimentary ICMJ’s Prospecting and Mining Journal available.

Eureka, California, Nov. 7-9, 2008 54th Gem & Mineral Show, Redwood Acres Fairgrounds. Email coprolite@earthlink.net Complimentary ICMJ’s Prospecting and Mining Journal available.Phoenix, Arizona, Nov. 15-16, 2008

Gold Expo at Sportsman's Warehouse, 19205 N 27th Ave, Phoenix, AZ. details, Marty (602) 548-0907 or Les augpaples@yahoo.com Complimentary ICMJ’s Prospecting and Mining Journal available.

Golden, Colorado, Nov. 17-21, 2008

"Economic Evaluation and Investment Decisions Methods" educational short course, Colorado School of Mines. Phone (800) 446-9488 ext 3321, or (303) 273-3321, or email space@mines.edu

San Francisco, CA, Nov. 30 - Dec. 1, 2008Hard Assets Investment Conference at the San Francisco Marriott. register at www.iiconf.com Complimentary copies of ICMJ’s Prospecting and Mining Journal available.

Sparks (Reno), VV, Dec. 1 - 5, 2008

Northwest Mining Association's 114th Annual Meeting, Exposition and Short Courses: "Mining for a Mineral Dependent World" at John Ascuaga's Nugget Casino Resort. Visit www.nwma.org for details. Complimentary copies of ICMJ’s Prospecting and Mining Journal available.


TROY WEIGHT

480 grains = 1 ounce

24 grains = 1 pennyweight

20 pennyweights = 1 ounce

15.4324 grains = 1 gram

There are 12 troy ounces to the pound.

A grain of gold is ROUGHLY the size of a mustard seed.


For Sale

8 HORSE BRIGGS with 3x4 Keene pump. T80 compressor, foot valve, like new—$550. (520)326-8801.

4" DREDGE =Gold Nugget, Hookah air system, 5.5HP Honda, good condition—$1,400. Portland, OR (503)234-1980.


PLACER GOLD LOCATIONS IN NEW HAMPSHIRE

FIRST RECORD FROM SULFIDE MINE IN LYMAN IN 1864. NEXT GOLD BEARING QUARTZ FROM THE ATWOOD FARM ALSO IN LISBON. THIS LED TO THE DODGE GOLD MINE WHICH OPERATED FROM 1867 TO 1877. RECORDS ARE CONFUSED BUT THE U.S. MINT BOUGHT $46,803 WORTH FROM THAT MINE. IT IS ESTIMATED THAT THE TOTAL OF ALL SOURCES IN THE AREA PRODUCED $70,000 WORTH.

SWIFTWATER = AMMONOOSUC RIVER. WARREN = BAKER RIVER. PITTSBURG = INDIAN RIVER, (BEST ON EAST BRANCH).

GOLD HAS BEEN FOUND ALSO IN BATH, BENTON, CAMPTON, CANAAN, DUBLIN, ENFIELD, FRANCONIA, HANOVER, LANDAFF, LEBANON, LISBON, LITTLETON, LYMAN, PITTSBURG, RUMNEY, SANDWICH, WARREN, SUGAR HILL, WOODSVILLE...... BEST REPORTED AREAS ARE BENTON, LYMAN, PITTSBURG, AND WARREN. MOST OF THE GOLD IS FLOUR TO ONE OR TWO GRAIN SIZE, BUT OCCASIONALLY 1 OR 2 OUNCE NUGGETS ARE FOUND. NEW HAMPSHIRE GOLD IS NEARLY THE PUREST IN THE WORLD, USUALLY ABOUT 23/ FINE. (SELDOM HAVING MORE THAN 1/2 KARAT OF IMPURITIES, MOSTLY SILVER).

GOLD IN MASSACHUSETTS

MOSTLY ON THE WEST SIDE OF THE CONNECTICUT RIVER. IT was recently found IN Greenfield, MA in COUCH & KEETS BROOK AND THE GREEN RIVER. Other TOWN LOCATIONS WHERE GOLD HAS BEEN FOUND RECENTLY ARE BERNARDSTON, ROWE, GILL, SHELBURNE, LEYDEN, CHARLEMONT, MONROE, ZOAR, DEERFIELD & HATFIELD.


Not MUCH CONNECTICUT GOLD WHAT'S HERE WAS THE RESULT OF THE RUN-OFF FROM THE MELTING GLACIER.

PLACES TO TRY PANNING IS BEACON HILL BROOK IN BEACON FALLS, LEAD MINE BROOK IN HARWINTON, NICKLE MINE BROOK IN TORRINGTON, THE WEST BRANCH FARMINGTON RIVER IN RIVERTON AND RECENTLY A FRIEND SAID HE WAS FINDING SMALL PIECES IN A BROOK NEAR ENFIELD, CT


Some Vermont gold locations

Bridgewater Corners; several locations near Junctions of Rte 4 & 100 A in the Ottauquechee River. Ferrisburg, Willie Brook in Grafton, West Hartford, the Gihon River in Eden Park, the Lamoille River in Johnson & Cambridge areas. In Ludlow, try the Black & Williams Rivers and Jewell Brook. In Marlboro try the Rock River and Adams Brook. In Morristown try the Sterling Brook. In Newfane try Adams Brook, Rock & West River. In Northfield try Dog River and Cox, Union & Stony Brook. Stony Brook in Pawlet. In Plymouth try Black River, and Buffalo Pinney, Hollow & Hale Hollow Brooks. The White River in Randolph, Roxbury, & Rochester. the Saxton River in Rockingham. The Green River in Searsburg. In Shaftsbury try Warm & Furnace Brooks. In Stowe = West Branch, Gold Brook & Waterbury River. Townshend = West & Saxton River & Willie Brook. Westfield & Troy = Missiquoi River. Waterbury = Winooski River & Thatcher Brook. and my favorite is Turkey Mountain Brook in Windham.



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WRITERS WANTED!
Posted by: Webmaster on Wednesday, October 29, 2008 - 07:52 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

WRITERS WANTED!

Share your treasure hunting, gold prospecting & collecting experiences, tips, etc. with articles for the TH’ers Gazette & website. Pay is $100 for 6 articles throughout a year. Contact George Streeter 603/876-4443



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Magnolias, Ribs and Sweet Tea
Posted by: Webmaster on Wednesday, October 29, 2008 - 07:50 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Magnolias, Ribs and Sweet Tea.

A Yankee visits the Deep South

As I write this in the first week in April, we are having yet another snow storm, more snow piling on top of the last 12 or so storms since the beginning of winter. Some cities have set records for total snowfall, but here in this small town in New Hampshire, we don’t keep records. All I know is that it has snowed a lot and in winter, we can’t detect. We are shut down from the first of November until the middle of April, with a few exceptions. All we can do to keep our sanity and calming a case of Cabin Fever is to follow the Forums and read Metal Detecting magazines. Winter for me is also a time for research, reading town histories, historical novels and books and just generally dreaming about getting out and detecting a farm field or new cellar hole.

My wife and I usually spend a week in Florida visiting her relatives during the cold months. Winter is a good time to visit south and it breaks up the monotony a bit. This year my sister-in-law invited us to Alabama to see her new house. Knowing my interest in metal detecting, she told my wife that a Civil War battle was fought on part of her land. This sounded too good to be true. No snow, detecting a battle site and eating some good Bar-B-Q sounded just fine to this winter-weary Yankee. I did some research on the battle and what little I could find told that it was a minor battle around a railroad trestle. The Union had built a fort and blockhouse to protect the trestle from a Confederate attack. Destroyed rails could be rebuilt overnight, a huge trestle took a while longer to rebuild and General Sherman needed troops and supplies for his March to the Sea. The creek the trestle spanned was called Sulpher Creek, thus the battle became known as The Battle for Sulpher Creek Trestle.

When we got to Alabama, I was surprised to see that it wasn’t too much different from home. We passed fields and farms, lots of forest, stone walls and creeks. Everything was familiar but different, and I took it all in. Before we turned into Sharon’s driveway, I spotted a historical marker telling about the battle. It turned out that the actual battle was fought a mile east, back towards town. The marker was placed there because it was a major highway which was close to Sulpher Creek. I didn’t let that dampen my enthusiasm, Sharon’s land was close to the battle and troops had to be all over town and just maybe they camped next to the creek on the land that I was given permission to detect. The next day, I got my chance to get out for a few hours while the girls were catching up on family gossip. Sharon owns about 8 acres of land, half of it being pasture that borders Sulpher Creek. I made a bee-line for the pasture and soon was digging plugs. Aluminum cans were everywhere, either the previous owner was real thirsty or this spot was used as a party place. I worked close to the creek and dug another piece of aluminum, a sort of lid. I got a chuckle when I cleaned it up and saw that it came from a can of Possum Brand Sardines…made in Maine, a little touch of New England. After a few more deep cans, I dug up a buckle that I still have to ID.

The next day, we went driving around the village of Elkmont. The Dogwoods were blooming a brilliant white and spring was definitely in the air. We stopped at a second-hand store to mosey around and like everyone I met down South, the owner was real friendly. A friend of his stopped by to chat, another friendly man who wore full overalls with a red bandana in the back pocket. He had a full bushy beard and the tanned face of a farmer. I poked around the shop, half-looking at things and half-listening to the conversation. I heard the Southern drawl for the first time as he talked about planting something or other down by his creek and we talked about the North with him and the weather in general and I had to laugh when he mentioned the big storm they had of a few inches of snow that melted that same day. As we were walking out the door, I mentioned to the owner that I was interested in the Civil War and he pointed across the street and told me the battlefield was only a mile away. So close and yet so far away, I would have been happy to just walk around and see where the battle took place but time was short. Sharon suggested we ask at the Town Office and find out exactly where the battle was and to see if I could do some detecting there. To my surprise, the Town Clerk said sure, just stay on town-owned land as the other land was private property. I was in Seventh Heaven; this was my dream to be able to hunt a battlefield. I have read scores of books about CW battles, have visited Gettysburg but this was different. This was one of the many small battles that were part of the whole War. This was a small piece of the huge puzzle that spanned all those bloody years.

That afternoon, Sharon said she and my wife would be trading recipes and why don’t I take her car and my detector and see what I can find? I drove to the town center and parked next to a railroad car that was on display. The tracks were removed years ago and the rail bed was now a well maintained walking path. I have literally walked for miles through the woods searching for cellar holes and thought nothing of it, but that easy mile to the battle site seemed like it took forever. Finally, I came to the creek and the spot where the trestle long ago spanned a deep ravine. Now it was filled in and a little beyond that, there was a story board telling about the battle on that fateful September day. I was itching to turn the Minelab on and start searching but I instead walked around trying to get a feel for the ground. On some sites, the ground speaks to me. Not in a literal sense but I get a feeling that something happened, that some struggle took place and at old sites, everything was a struggle. Back home I dig up twisted pieces of iron, oxen shoes, broken shoe buckles and the occasional Colonial coin or button. Everything came hard to the early settlers who worked from sun-up to damnation trying to scratch a living out of the bony New England soil. Yes, the ground speaks to me of footsteps long past. My hunting partner, Julio, actually talks to the ground, coaxing those Reales right out of the ground where I’m more of a listener.

There was very little ground to detect that wasn’t posted. Off to the side of the rail bed where the battle took place, there was maybe 10 feet, then a fence and posted signs every 100 feet or so. On the other side, the rail bed sloped off at a sharp angle and I lost my footing a few times as I recovered some large iron nuts, probably part of the rail connectors. Some soda cans were dug up and other bits of fencing saw the light of day and before I knew it, 2 hours had passed and I was thirsty. Note to self : buy a canteen. I headed back towards town to see if I could find any other spots to search and had gone about 200 feet or so when I turned back around. I wasn’t going to give up easily. I re-read the story board, saw where the rifle pits were or where I thought they would be, looked at the troop movements and figured there was a lot of lead flying that day. The Confederates wanted to capture the fort and the Union wasn’t about to hand them the keys. I turned up the Sensitivity on the detector and worked slow, listening for the good sounds amidst the iron drones like I do when I hunt around cellar holes. Finally, there was one good tone in there. I pinpointed and dug up a shotgun casing. Working my way to the fence, I got another solid tone, the best one of the day. I knelt to dig the plug and a hound dog walked by, sniffed my pant leg and moved on. The signal wasn’t in the plug and that’s usually a good sign. I dug another scoopful and saw a flash of bone-white, grabbed a fistful of dirt and felt something heavy. Using my fingers to sift, a three-ringer showed itself for the first time in over 140 years. It was a drop, probably by a Confederate, .69 cal. . I held that bullet in my hand and shook my head. I spoke out loud….”I can’t believe it”, I also couldn’t believe the size of it, this baby could do some damage! I had bought some artifacts in Gettysburg, shell fragments, buttons and some bullets, but this was different. This was way different. I sat back for a few minutes and forgot about my growing thirst. The only sound was the creek below. I tried to imagine that September day back in 1864 and what it must have been like with the woods full of smoke, with shells exploding over the fort, men running in every direction. I tried to grasp the confusion of battle, of bullets flying, splintering branches and bone and the creek running red. I could almost hear the Rebel yell and more muzzle blasts as the Union chain of command was picked off and finally, mercifully, they surrendered. I’m not ashamed to admit that I got a little choked up thinking about all that. All the pages I read, all the movies I watched about the Civil War had come full circle. Where I sat, men had fought and blood was spilled. Brave soldiers fighting for what they believed in went beyond the threshold of courage on that day and many others. 200 men died in this battle, 200 men added to the eventual list of over 650,000. I felt humbled and overwhelmed at the same time. I also realized I was squeezing that bullet so hard that it left an impression in my hand, as that hunt will leave an impression on me for a long time to come. I filled in my hole and headed home.

I had traveled 1200 miles and found one small piece that I’ll hold in high regard. I have dug some Civil War items in New Hampshire… A heart rosette, a button and a tongue from a Militia belt, things that might have seen battle, maybe not. All I know is this war casts a spell on you. There is so much to learn, so much more to read. Other artifacts will be discovered, hopefully a few more by me and you readers out there sure dig a lot of great finds every day. Things that otherwise would remain in the ground and in a generation or so, they would be gone. Written history is one thing, history that you can hold in your hand is another. That’s why we do what we do.



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Florida’s Treasure Coast & the 1715 Fleet
Posted by: Webmaster on Wednesday, October 29, 2008 - 07:49 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Florida’s Treasure Coast & the 1715 Fleet

Bob Ellis 05-11-07

In between Sebastian, FL and Stuart, FL lies miles of beaches called the Treasure Coast where during the 17th and 18th centuries Spanish ships and galleons wrecked along this coast. Some of the ships were filled with unbelievable treasures, from the New World and the Orient, that were destined for Spain but, instead, crashed into the outer reefs and sandy bottoms creating hidden treasure waiting to be rediscovered.

Modern history had forgotten about these shipwreck tragedies along this coast until a treasure hunter, named Kip Wagner, in the early 1960, wrote a book called Pieces of Eight describing his adventures rediscovering the 1715 Fleet that sank all along this coast and the subsequent reaping of millions of dollars of treasure for himself, a few friends and the state of Florida, from the sunken fleet.

Today, Wagner’s adventures and finds still motivate treasure hunters, researchers and archeologists alike, to search for the remaining artifacts of known and unknown shipwrecks. Silver and gold coins and other treasure are still being found on these beaches and the adjacent ocean floor. If you visit the Treasure Coast, bring your metal detector. You might bring home a piece of Spanish colonial history with you.

For an armchair adventure of the trials and tribulations of shipwreck treasure hunting in the early 1960’s, you must read “Pieces of Eight ” by Kip Wagner. He takes you from his first bout of treasure fever to the eventual successful recovery of millions of dollars of treasure and artifacts. Along the way he reveals, to the reader, the failures and the disappointments encountered and the amount of dedication, persistence, hard work, innovation, and ingenuity that was needed to succeed. Wagner included in his book many pictures of the treasure recovered from the 1715 fleet ,but if you want to see actual 1715 fleet treasure, it's on display at two museums in Sebastian, FL.

At the McLarty Treasure Museum at Sebastian Inlet State Park, actual 1715 fleet treasures and artifacts can be viewed for a mere one dollar per person entry fee. If you have time, see the Arts and Entertainment production (The Queen’s Jewels and the 1715 Fleet) that is shown throughout the day, at no addition cost to you. The museum itself occupies land once used as the survivors and salvaging camp for the 1715 Spanish Plate Fleet and is a National Historical Landmark today. Metal detecting is allowed on its beach front if you can’t wait to try to find your own treasure, but access to the beach is about a quarter of a mile away. If you want to see more actual 1715 fleet treasure or to buy an artifact from the 1715 fleet, stop by the Mel Fisher's Treasures museum.

Mel Fisher passed away in 1998, but his family still operates the Mel Fisher's Treasures museum. Located at 1322 U.S. Highway One Sebastian, Fl. The museum was founded by Mel Fisher to display some of the artifacts, from the 1715 fleet, that his team discovered after he was invited in the early 1960’s to join the successful Kip Wagner team, to search for the remaining 1715 fleet treasure. Besides the museum, the price of admission includes a short movie about Mel Fisher and admission to their gift shop. If you must have a coin, from the 1715 fleet or from the Atocha, they will sell you one, but first, you should try to find one yourself on the Treasure Coast.

Every year metal detecting treasure hunters make the Treasure Coast live up to its name by finding treasure on the it's beaches. You might find some 1715 fleet artifacts to take home with you, if you have time to metal detect for a few hours. To increase your chances, follow the directions given in “Shipwrecks Near Wabasso Beach” by Frogfoot Weller, to find the specific beaches where gold and silver coins, from the 1715 fleet, have been found or detected. Detecting is allowed on most beaches all day long, but most in water detecting is prohibited by law. While on vacation, one of my fellow metal detecting club members detected a gold coin from the 1715 fleet in December 2005 and his wife or son detected a silver coin, called a four real, on the same day. The chances of finding an artifact or coin from the 1715 fleet remains slim but you might be one of the lucky ones, like my fellow club members were.



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Mountain Man Plains, Indian Canadian Fur Trade
Posted by: Webmaster on Wednesday, October 29, 2008 - 07:45 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Mountain Man Plains,

Indian Canadian Fur Trade

The Mountain Man Plains Indian Fur Trade website is for the collecting and sharing of information on the Rocky Mountain fur trade that was conducted between the Mountain Man, the Plains Indian, and the fur traders of the United States and Canada. In the Mountain Man and Native American Fur Trade articles, the Plains Indians and the Indians of the Rocky Mountains are grouped together as Plains Indians.

http://www.thefurtrapper.com/index.htm

The Mountain Man Indian Fur Trade website is concerned with the history of the Mountain Man and the Plains Indian fur trade from the early 1800s to 1840s, not trapping. There have been several emails against trapping fur bearing animals. If the people that sent those emails had read the articles, they would know the Mountain Man Indian Fur Trade website is not about trapping....I have never trapped anything, and have no interest in doing so. I can only plead guilty to choosing a poor .com name for the Mountain Man website. Despite the importance of leg traps for the Mountain Man in the Rocky Mountain fur trade, I personally feel leg traps were cruel and inhumane.



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Appraisal Information
Posted by: Webmaster on Wednesday, October 29, 2008 - 07:42 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Appraisal Information

What it Means to your Jewelry

There Are Different Types of Appraisals You Can get


INSURANCE APPRAISAL
THIS TYPE OF APPRAISAL IS WHAT MOST PEOPLE GET WHEN THEY BUY A DIAMOND OR A PIECE OF JEWELRY. IT IS WRITTEN FOR 2 REASONS, ONE (AND I MAY SOUND CYNICAL) IS TO GIVE YOU THE FEELING THAT YOU GOT A GOOD DEAL ON THE PURCHASE YOU JUST MADE. IF YOU BOUGHT SOMETHING FOR $2000.00 WHAT SHOULD YOUR APPRAISAL BE FOR? WELL THAT IS A HARD QUESTION TO ANSWER. THE HONEST ANSWER IS THAT IT SHOULD BE APPRAISED FOR $2000. BECAUSE IF YOU LOST YOUR ITEM THE NEXT DAY, YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO GO BACK TO THE STORE AND BUY THE SAME THING FOR THE SAME PRICE AGAIN, RIGHT? HOWEVER HERE IS WHERE THE PROBLEMS START. WHAT IF YOU INSURED THAT PURCHASE FOR $2000. AND YOU LOST IT AND TOLD YOUR INSURANCE COMPANY YOU WANT TO PUT A CLAIM IN, WELL YOU HAVE NO INPUT ON WHAT JEWELRY STORE THEY GO TO GET THE REPLACEMENT. WHAT IF THEY WENT TO TIFFANY'S TO REPLACE IT, YOU WOULD NOT GET THE SAME ITEM YOU PURCHASED FOR THAT PRICE FROM THEM. THAT IS WHY APPRAISALS FOR INSURANCE PURPOSES ARE WRITTEN FOR A HIGHER AMOUNT.

THE OTHER WAY THESE APPRAISALS ARE WRITTEN IS AS A SELLING TOOL. HOW MANY TIMES DO YOU SEE AN ADVERTISEMENT THAT WHATEVER YOU BUY FROM US WILL APPRAISE FOR DOUBLE? WELL DOUBLE OF WHAT? ANYONE CAN WRITE AN APPRAISAL AND THERE IS NO STRICT GUIDELINE THAT EVERYONE HAS TO FOLLOW SO WHAT IS THE APPRAISED VALUE MEAN? THE HONEST ANSWER IS NOT MUCH. DO NOT USE THIS VALUE TO BASE THE TRUE WORTH OF YOUR ITEM BECAUSE YOU WILL BE VERY DISAPPOINTED.

IF YOU ARE SELLING YOUR JEWELRY, WE HAVE FOUND THAT YOU WILL GET BETWEEN 10%-30% OF THAT AMOUNT, DEPENDING ON WHERE IT WAS BOUGHT AND WHO ACTUALLY WROTE THE APPRAISAL.

REPLACEMENT VALUE APPRAISAL

THIS TYPE OF APPRAISAL IS GOING TO BE WRITTEN WITH THE EXACT FIGURE THAT YOU PAID FOR THE ITEM THAT YOU BOUGHT. UNLIKE OTHER INSURANCE APPRAISALS WHOEVER WRITES THIS ONE IS NOT GOING TO INFLATE THE VALUE OF YOUR JEWELRY JUST TO MAKE YOU FEEL LIKE YOU GOT A GOOD DEAL ON YOUR PURCHASE. IF YOU ARE GOING TO GET YOUR JEWELRY INSURED BY A COMPANY THAT WILL PAY YOU IN CASH FOR YOUR LOSS, THEN THIS IS A GOOD WAY TO GO. THERE IS NO REASON TO PAY EXTRA PREMIUMS IF YOU KNOW YOU WILL BE ABLE TO GET THE SAME PIECE OF JEWELRY THAT YOU HAD WITH THIS AMOUNT OF MONEY.

APPRAISAL TO SELL YOUR JEWELRY
THIS IS WHAT A JEWELRY STORE OR PAWN SHOP WOULD OFFER YOU FOR YOUR JEWELRY THAT YOU WANT TO SELL. THIS VALUE IS GOING TO BE BASED ON WHAT WE CAN PAY FOR IT AT THE WHOLESALE LEVEL AND THEN WHAT CONDITION THE JEWELRY IS IN AND WHETHER OR NOT IT CAN BE RESOLD OR NOT. DON'T COMPARE THE VALUE OF ANY OF THE OTHER APPRAISALS TO THIS VALUE, THOSE ARE FOR REPLACING THE ITEM YOU HAVE IN BRAND NEW FORM AND FROM AN INSURANCE COMPANY THAT IS GOING TO PAY FULL RETAIL. ANOTHER FACTOR IS GOING TO BE WHERE YOU PURCHASED YOUR JEWELRY FROM ORIGINALLY, IF YOU PAID TOO MUCH TO BEGIN WITH YOU ARE GOING TO GET A LOT LESS THAN YOU PAID.



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Charlie 1st Bahamas Treasure Hunting Adventure
Posted by: Webmaster on Wednesday, October 29, 2008 - 07:39 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Charlie 1st Bahamas Treasure Hunting Adventure


This story began in August 2007 in Marlborough, N.H. My wife and I were visiting our daughter who lives in Dublin N.H. We were passing through Marlborough, NH on our way to her home, When I noticed the STREETERS sign outside this store. I said to my daughter " Hey look at that" ! She marked down the location as we proceeded to her home.

The next day, as we were returning from Keene N.H., I mentioned to Trish that we should stop in and look around at Streeters. She, being the adventurous type, replied in a nano-second and we found our selves within this great store/museum.

Once inside, I found myself in a treasure seekers dream. There were all sorts of detectors, widgets, treasure finds, gold items, plastic holders for all sorts of stuff and items too numerous to mention. Keep in mind that I am a guy who enjoys shopping for hours in Home Depot and Lowes. My wife, Judy, thinks I have a condition that needs medical intervention. I am sure that I will have sympathy from those who read this article and can relate to this problem.

My wife and daughter captured George Streeter in conversation. As I looked and touched all the items in his store. George was as hospitable, as he always is and my family was very impressed with him. Eventually I was finished looking around his store and joined the group in conversation. Well, the outcome of the visit was that I purchased two Garrett Ace 250s from George and was completely happy with the purchase. George threw in a lot of extras, including , earphones, detector covers etc, at no cost. I was to find out later that this is George, and I will continue to shop in his store. He gives a great deal to all who there.

During the following months Trish searched her two acres of property in Dublin, N. H.. She found all sorts of items that had been lost over the years. She feels because N.H. Is one of the earliest states there is much to be found with a metal detector.

Back in Florida, I didn't do too much metal detecting, because of too many social obligations. I was reading George's Gazette , which I got when I bought the detectors from him. More and more I was getting interested in his Caribbean Adventures. The itch was becoming part of my body's framework. Finally, I gave George a call to investigate the matter. The outcome was that I was accepted as a beginner for an up coming trip to Nassau

I had done a great deal of reading on the subject of Metal Detectors and decided to get a "real detector" for the trip. I purchased an Excalibur ll 1000 for underwater operation from George.
After arranging my own airfare, we all met in Nassau. Our chosen location was a 1600 sq. Ft. Villa with a swimming pool. There was enough room to sleep all five of us. George Streeter, Gale Hopkins, Don Forster, Bryan Llewelyn ,and myself. Gale, Don and George are from N.H., Bryan is from Wales, and I am from Florida.

On the first day we all had arrived at the villa by 3:30pm. After unpacking and getting settled in our new abode, we looked at each other with a blank stare implying "What do we do next?" George settled it by stating "We came here to detect." That set the tone and off we went to Cable Beach to finish out our first half day at the beach. George had rented a van at the airport. The van had plenty of room for all of us and our equipment. I suppose I should mention that within those first few hours(about four hours) I found my first ring a new tungsten carbide, and many coins. Also my brand new detector died after about three hours of operation. I was at a loss about what to do. Fortunate, I was with experienced guys and Don Foster loaned me his 10" Excalibur, which was his back-up detector. Who would ever think that this new detector would quit on the first day of operation!

After the first day, we settle into a routine of operation. Bryan, who was used to driving on the left, became our driver. He and I decided to do the shopping for food. Between all of us every thing worked out for a most enjoyable trip. Each morning we started out with a breakfast in our bellies, and gold lust in our hearts.
Throughout our seven days we searched nearly all the beaches on the island. Some were easier to do and some due to the high surf, had to be overlooked for that time. Don was a great help to myself and Bryan. Gale was a bucket full of information for us, and of course, George filled in all the gaps in my lack of information and knowledge. Bryan was also appreciative for all the help he received. He came a long distance to join the group. I must say that we all had a great time. George is the "ULTIMATE PLANNER" when it comes to a Caribbean Trip.

We all found gold. I found five rings, two gold, two silver, and one tungsten carbide. George stunned us all by finding over 100 grams of the precious stuff. I guess 35 years of experience helps!!!

Of course, we all had special comments for each other as each found some gold. They were complimentary in nature, of course, but I don't think that I will mention any of them in this article. Some might not understand their nature. I can assure you all five of us did, and we had a ball commenting on each others' finds.

After spending seven days with a great bunch of guys, I can hardly wait for the next trip. If George invites me, I will respond in a nano-second and never look back. If one is willing to send 7 days ,,, detecting from 9 am to 7pm in a variety of locations, this is the trip for you!! Everyone chips in his opinion, but the final decision is George's. Remarkably, his decisions reflect the group's, and everything flows as smoothly as a silk worm in his cocoon.

Oh, since now that I have gone on a professional detecting trip, all the books that I have been reading are beginning to make sense to me. One can read volumes and volumes, but until you actually hear the signals reading is of little value. Now after hearing the signals and re reading the books I believe that I left a lot of gold in Nassau. Oh well, on my next trip, I hope to do better.

One has to experience the Caribbean to understand the value of their beaches. Unusually crystal clear water, where on is able to count their toes while looking a the sandy bottom. I s this ideal? From where most of us come from, we are lucky to see out belt buckles!! I was able to find an internet site where one is able to purchase a divers mask with prescription lenses for about $65.00. Do you wan to read the newspaper under water? P.S. You have to be old enough to wear glasses.

Yes, with the right attitude, one will be able to join one of George's groups to the Caribbean. You will never regret it. You will gain a world of information on metal detecting in the crystal waters of the Caribbean.

I will close this article by saying to George, Gale ,Don and Bryan " Thank you for making this trip a lifelong memory for me"!!!! We had a wonderful group . I am sure many more before has had the same experience.

George, let me say, "TWO THUMBS UP". Charlie Anderson

bahamasII.jpg

Bahamas Adventure #2

bahamasI.jpg

Bahamas Adventure #1



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Field Hunting 101
Posted by: Webmaster on Wednesday, October 29, 2008 - 07:38 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Field Hunting 101

By Norma Parda.

My husband and I have been hunting corn/farm fields for quite some time. We have found some very nice things in those fields. Some of our best finds actually. It is for that reason I’m writing this article, to share some of our thoughts and techniques. I want to encourage seasoned, and new to the hobby detectorist, to try if you haven’t, and keep at it if you have, hunting farm fields. Here are a few pointers for hunting them, and how to hunt without getting overwhelmed by the size of the field.

Don’t look at the field as a whole. By this I mean look at it sort of as a patch work quilt or grid. I know it sounds funny, but it works for vast areas when you don’t know where to start. Pick a corner of the field and decide how small or large you want the area to be to start hunting in. (For example, a 50 feet by 50 feet area) When you figure out what size you want that area to be, hunt in a pattern. Start at the first edge of that area, walk straight out for 50 feet, move to the left or right 4 or 5 feet, and walk straight back in a new row to where you began. Each time just slightly over lapping the edge of last row you just did beside you. Take it row by row until you have covered the area you decided on. When your ready to leave that field, and will be going back to hunt it again, mark it with a rock, a stick or even a line in the dirt where you left off. Better yet, make a mental note of the landscape and pick a landmark, a tree, group of bushes, barn etc., something that won’t change, to show where you left off and where you will begin again next time. Do this each time you go there until the field is finished. It sounds like a long process, I know, but in the long run you’ll know where you’ve been, and what field you’ve already hunted in its entirety. Or at least until its turned over again next season.

Another tip. Be patient, this isn’t park hunting. Their isn’t going to be a target every 2 feet. It takes time. Lots of time. But the rewards can be great. We were just hunting today in a field we never hunted before and came out of there with a 1755 Spanish 1 Reale in pretty good condition. This time it took about an hour or so of hunting time, but it won’t always that way. We have been in fields for hours. Don’t let the time factor discourage you from field hunting. This is why grid hunting is such a good method.

Also keep in mind with farm field hunting, that the people who farmed these fields did it with hand tools. Many people, planting, weeding, and harvesting, by hand, back in the day. They spent many hours and lost many things.

You will find other things beside coins just as fascinating out there, and not only underground, but sometimes on the surface so look as you swing. In the past we’ve found clay and glass marbles, pottery, bottles, old buttons, and coins, all on the top of the soil. This past summer I found a Barber quarter just laying on top of the ground without a detector in really great condition, in a field we have detected many times before.

The best part, I think, about hunting fields is that they are being plowed and recycled, over and over again. Things are brought up to the surface, or close enough to it, every planting season, which makes farm field hunting a great asset to the detectorist. If you have patience and take the time that’s needed to hunt the fields you won‘t be disappointed.

As always, leave the land the way you found it, keep and throw away the trash you find, the farmers will be grateful, fill your holes even in farm fields, and always, obtain permission before hunting any land so the hobby keeps its good name. Most of all have fun, make new friends, and enjoy the time outdoors.

Happy Hunting…… Norma Parda



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NH Bob’s Natural Hunts
Posted by: Webmaster on Wednesday, October 29, 2008 - 07:35 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  NH Bob’s Natural Hunts

32 treasure hunters from many states attended the annual NH Bob Natural Fall Hunt on Oct. 18, 2008. There was a morning frost & the rest of the day was  sunny in the mid in 50’s. A lot of old & neat things were found. See them at treasures found at www.northeastmetaldetectingforum.com . There were also drawings for all kind of neat prizes too & one lucky kid won a Fisher metal detector.

NH Bob's 2009 Spring Natural hunt is  in conjunction with BONE 16 & an all day hunt on April 16 and   BONE 16 is having it's 3rd  annaul NH Bob National Natural Hunt on  April 17, 2009.  For info' contact New Hampshire Bob Lewis at 603/313-6300,



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Vinegar
Posted by: GeorgeStreeter on Tuesday, October 14, 2008 - 06:53 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Vinegar


Here is straightforward home remedies and natural beauty tips using vinegar. For the accident prone, some of vinegar's uses in emergencies might be helpful too.

Kill bacteria in meats. Marinating meat in Vinegar kills bacteria and tenderizes the meat. Use one-quarter cup vinegar for a two to three pound roast, marinate overnight, and then cook without draining or rinsing the meat. Add herbs to the vinegar when marinating as desired.
Dissolve warts. Mix one part Apple Cider Vinegar to one part glycerin into a lotion and apply daily to warts until they dissolve.

Remove stubborn stains from furniture upholstery & clothes. Apply White Vinegar directly to the stain, and then wash as directed by the manufacturer's instructions.
Grow beautiful azaleas. Occasionally water plants with a mixture of two White Vinegar to one-quart water. Azaleas love acidic soil.
Relieve arthritis. Before each meal, drink a glass of water containing two teaspoons Apple Cider Vinegar. Give this folk remedy at least three weeks to start working.

Kill unwanted grass. Pour White Vinegar in crevices and between bricks.

Remove corns. Make a poultice of one crumbled piece of bread soaked in one-quarter cup Vinegar. Let poultice sit for one-half hour, then apply to the corn and tape in place overnight. If corn does not peel off by morning, reapply the poultice for several consecutive nights.

Clean the hoses & unclog soap scum from a washing machine. Once a month pour one cup of White Vinegar into the washing machine & run the machine through a normal cycle, without clothes.

Cure an upset stomach. Drink two teaspoons Apple Cider Vinegar in one-cup water to soothe an upset stomach.

Kill germs on bathroom fixtures. Use one part Vinegar to one part water in a spray bottle. Spray the bathroom fixtures and floor, then wipe clean.

Clean soap scum, mildew, and grime from bathtub, tile, and shower curtains. Simply wipe the surface with Vinegar and rinse with water.
Deodorize the air. Vinegar is a natural air freshener when sprayed in a room.
Relieve itching. Use a cotton ball to dab mosquito and other bug bites with Vinegar straight from the bottle.

Clean lime deposits and calcium sludge from an automatic drip coffee maker.
Once a month fill the reservoir with White Vinegar and run through the brew cycle. Rinse thoroughly with two cycles of cold water.
Soothe sunburn pain. Apply undiluted Vinegar to the burn.

Clean food-stained pots & pans. Fill the pots and pans with White Vinegar and let stand for thirty minutes. Then rinse in hot, soapy water.

Prevent bright colored clothes from fading.
Before putting the article in the washing machine, soak it in White Vinegar for ten minutes.
Keep a garbage disposal clean and smelling fresh. Mix one cup of Vinegar in enough water to fill an ice cube tray, freeze the mixture, grind the cubes through the disposal, and flush with cold water.
Clean a toilet bowl. Pour in one cup of White Vinegar, let it stand for five minutes, and flush.
Prevent yeast infections. Douche with one tablespoon White Vinegar to one-quart warm water to adjust the pH balance in the vagina.

Clean dentures. Soak dentures overnight in White Vinegar, and then brush away tartar with a toothbrush.

Remove perspiration stains from clothes.
Apply one part White Vinegar to four parts water, then rinse.

Deodorize a room filled with cigarette smoke or paint fumes. Place a small bowl of White Vinegar in the room.

Cure the hiccups. Mix one teaspoon Apple Cider Vinegar in one cup of warm water, and drink.
Eliminate odors from used jars.
Rinse peanut butter and mayonnaise jars with White Vinegar.

Condition dry hair. Shampoo, then rinse hair with a mixture of one cup Apple Cider Vinegar
and two cups water. Vinegar adds highlights to brunette hair, restores the acid mantel, and removes soap film and sebum oil.
Clean mineral deposits from a steam iron.
Fill the water tank with White Vinegar. Turn the iron to the steam setting and steam iron a soft utility rag to clean the steam ports.
Repeat the process with water, then thoroughly rinse out the inside of your iron.
Remove light scorch marks from fabrics.
Rub lightly with White Vinegar, then wipe with a clean cloth.

Keep drains open. Pour one-half box of old baking soda down the drain followed by one cup White Vinegar. When the bubbling stops, run the hot water.

Remove decals or bumper stickers.
Soak a cloth in Vinegar and cover the decal or bumper sticker for several minutes until the vinegar soaks in. The decals and bumper
stickers should peel off easily.

Deodorize a wool sweater. Wash sweater, then rinse in equal parts Vinegar and water to remove odor.

Prevent lint from clinging to clothes.
Add one cup Vinegar to each wash load.
Prevent ice from forming on a car windshield overnight.

Coat the window with a solution of three parts White or Apple Cider Vinegar to one part water.
Prolong the life of flowers in a vase.
Add two tablespoons of White Vinegar plus three tablespoons of sugar per quart of warm water. Stems should be in three to four inches of water.

Prevent cracked hard-boiled eggs. Add two tablespoons of White Vinegar per quart of water before boiling to prevent the eggs from cracking. The eggshells will also peel off faster and easier.

Clean windows. Use undiluted Vinegar in a spray bottle. Dry with a soft cloth.
Eliminate unpleasant cooking odors in the kitchen. Boil one tablespoon of White Vinegar with one cup of water.

Remove wallpaper. Mix equal parts Vinegar and hot water. Use a paint roller to wet the paper thoroughly with the mixture. Repeat. Paper should peal off in sheets.
Eliminate animal urine stains from carpet.
Blot up urine, flush several times with lukewarm water, then apply a
mixture of equal parts White Vinegar and cool water. Blot up, rinse, and let dry.

Relieve a cold. Mix one-quarter cup Apple Cider Vinegar with one-quarter cup honey. Take 1 tablespoon six to eight times daily.
Deodorize a stale lunch box. Soak a paper napkin in Vinegar and leave it inside the closed lunch box overnight.

Prevent soapy film on glassware. Place a cup of White Vinegar on the bottom rack of your dishwasher, run for five minutes, then run though the full cycle. A cup of white vinegar
run through the entire cycle once a month will also reduce soap scum on the inner workings.
Unclog a showerhead. Unscrew the shower head, remove the rubber washer, place the head in a pot filled with equal parts Vinegar and water, bring to a boil, then simmer for five minutes.



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Antonio's Finds from Spain
Posted by: dvca-2 on Saturday, September 13, 2008 - 08:42 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Hello I'm from Spain this is my treasure photos this summer. My machine is an Excalibur 1000 and a Minelab Explorer II Pro

I love this club. Please upload my photos collection. Thanks

Antonio Lopez    ( DVCA-2)

P1010013.JPG
Click to view all of my photos



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Suzy’s Jokes
Posted by: GeorgeStreeter on Tuesday, August 19, 2008 - 02:47 PM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Suzy’s Jokes

Might as Well Go Fishing ; A young guy from Texas moves to California and goes to one of those big "everything under one roof" stores looking for a job. The manager asked, "Do you have any sales experience?"
The kid said, "Sure, I was a salesman back home in Texas." The boss liked the kid so he gave him the job. "You start tomorrow. I’ll come down after we close and see how you did." His first day on the job was rough but he got through it. After the store was locked up, the boss came down to see how things went.
"How many sales did you make today?"
The young man replied without hesitating, "One." The boss said, "Just one? Our sales people average 20 or 30 sales a day. How much was the sale for?" The kid said, "$101,237.64." The boss said, "$101,237.64?! What the hell did you sell?!" The kid said, "First I sold him a small fish hook. Then I sold him a medium fish hook. Then I sold him a larger fish hook. Then I sold him a new fishing rod. Then I asked him where he was going fishing and he said down at the coast, so I told him he was gonna need a boat, so we went down to the boat department and I sold him that twin-engine Chris Craft. Then he said he didn’t think his Honda Civic would pull it, so I took him down to the automotive department and sold him that 4x4 Blazer." Amazed, the boss said, "A guy came in here to buy a fish hook and you sold him a boat and a truck?"
"No, he came here to buy a box of necessaries for his wife and I said, 'Well, your weekend’s shot, you might as well go fishing.'"

After living in the remote wilderness of Kentucky all his life, an old codger decided it was time to visit the big city. In one of the city’s stores, he picked up a mirror and looked in it. Not knowing what it was, he remarked, “How about that! Here’s a picture of my daddy.” He bought the “picture,” but on the way home remembered that his wife, Lizzy, didn’t much like his father. So he hung it in the barn, and every morning before leaving for the fields, he would go there and look at it.
The man’s many trips to the barn began to draw Lizzy’s suspicion. One day after her husband left, she searched the barn and found the mirror. As she looked into the glass, she fumed, “So that’s the ugly so-and-so he’s runnin’ around with.”

If you think life’s bad then imagine being a egg. You only get laid once, only get smashed once and the only person to sit on your face is your mum.

The perfect Wal-Mart Greeter, A very loud, unattractive, mean-acting woman walks into Wal-Mart with her two kids in tow, screaming obscenities at them all the way through the entrance. The Wal-Mart Greeter says, "Good morning and welcome to Wal-Mart Nice children you've got there - are they twins?" The ugly woman stops screaming long enough to say, "Hell no they ain't, the oldest one, he's 9 and the younger one, she's 7. Why the hell would you think they're twins?........ Do you really think they look alike?" "No", replies the greeter, "I just couldn't believe you got laid twice."

IT’S ALL COMING BACK, A preacher was making his rounds to his parishioners on a bicycle, when he came upon a little boy trying to sell a lawn mower.” How much do you want for the mower?" asked the preacher. "I just want enough money to go out and buy me a bicycle," said the little boy. After a moment of consideration, the preacher asked, "Will you take my bike in trade for it?" The little boy asked if he could try it out first. After riding the bike around a little while he said, "Mister, you've got yourself a deal." The preacher took the mower and began to crank it. He pulled on the rope a few times with no response from the mower. The preacher called the little boy over and said, "I can't get this mower to start." The little boy said, "That's because you have to cuss at it to get it started." The preacher said, "I'm a minister, and I can't cuss. It's been so long since I've been saved that I don't even remember how to cuss." The little boy looked at him happily and said, "Just keep pulling on that rope. It'll come back to you.

An elderly couple were sitting together watching television. During one of those commercials, the husband asked his wife, "Whatever happened to our sexual relations?"

After a long thoughtful silence, the wife replied during the next commercial, "You know, I don't know. I don't even think we got a Christmas card from them this year.

There were two guys in the Army. One day one of the guys gets a letter from his mother and after reading it becomes very sad. His friend (the other guy) asked him what was wrong. The first guy responded by handing him the letter. So the second guy reads that his friends mother had written that the first guy's girlfriend was in bed with arthritis. "Well" The friend said to the first guy... "That's not so bad..." The first guy turns to him and says "Yea, That's what you think. I know those Riotous boys and Art is the worst one!"

Doctor Dave had slept with one of his patients and had felt guilty all day long. No matter how much he tried to forget about it, he couldn't. The guilt and sense of betrayal was overwhelming. But every once in a while he'd hear that soothing voice, within himself, trying to reassure him: "Dave, don't worry about it. You aren't the first doctor to sleep with one of their patients and you won't be the last. And you're single. Let it go......" But invariably the other voice would bring him back to reality: "Dave, you're a vet..."

Two men waiting at the pearly gates strike up a conversation. "How'd you die?" the first man asks the second. "I froze to death," says the second. "That's awful, how does it feel to freeze to death?" says the first. "It's very uncomfortable at first, you get the shakes, and you get pains in all your fingers and toes. But eventually, it's a very calm way to go. You get numb and you kind of drift off, as if you're sleeping. How did you die?" says the second.

"I had a heart attack", says the first guy. "You see, I knew my wife was cheating on me, so one day I showed up at home unexpectedly. I ran up to the bedroom, and found her alone, knitting. I ran down to the basement, but no one was hiding there. I ran up to the second floor, but no one was hiding there either. I ran as fast as I could to the attic, and just as I got there, I had a massive heart attack and died." The second man shakes his head. "that's so ironic" he says. "What do you mean?" asks the first man "If you had only stopped to look in the freezer, we'd both still be alive."

A painting contractor was speaking with a woman about her job. In the first room, she said she would like a pale blue. The contractor wrote this down and went to the window, opened it, and yelled out "green side up!" In the second room, she told the painter she would like it painted in a soft yellow. He wrote this on his pad, walked to the window, opened it, and yelled "green side up!" The lady was somewhat curious, but she said nothing. In the third room, she said she would like it painted a warm rose color. The painter wrote this down, walked to the window, opened it and yelled "green side up!" The lady then asked him, "Why do you keep yelling 'green side up'?"
"I'm sorry," came the reply. "But I have a crew of blondes laying sod across the street.

A dumb blonde was standing in front of a soda machine outside of a local store. After putting in sixty cents, a root beer pops out of the machine. She set it on the ground, puts sixty more cents into the machine, and pushes another button; suddenly, a coke comes out the machine!
She continued to do this until a man waiting to use the machine became impatient. "Excuse me, can I get my soda and then you can go back to whatever stupid thing you are doing?"
The blonde turns around and says, "Yeah right! I'm not giving up this
machine while I'm still winning!"

A young lady came home from a date, rather sad. She told her mother, "Anthony proposed to me an hour ago." "Then why are you so sad?" her mother asked. "Because he also told me he is an atheist. Mom, he doesn't even believe there's a Hell." Her mother replied, "Marry him anyway. Between the two of us, we'll show him how wrong he is."

An old man is speaking to a young boy & they get onto the topic of death. "So little boy, how would you like to die?" asks the man. "I want to die sleeping like my grandfather, not screaming like the other people in the car".

As most young, weak and smart kids are, Ken was picked on constantly by the bullies in school. They stole his lunch, beat him up and just downright made his life miserable. It took him a couple of weeks to find a way to get back at these bullies and when he found out what would get them back, he went all out.
He was on the bus where he normally got his lunch stolen when he brought out a bottle with small brown balls in it. After discreetly getting some milk duds from his pocket, he then put the candy in his mouth and began making 'mom... yum!' type sounds loud enough for the other kids to hear. The bus bully then snatched the jar from Ken's hand and asked 'What's in the bottle that you are making such a big deal of?' 'Well, they're smart pills,' Ken replied. 'Smart pills?' the bully sneered. He opened the jar and popped a couple of the foreign brown balls in his mouth.
'Pweeuuweppblahhh!' he reacted. 'What is this stuff? It tastes like rabbit poop!!!'
Ken smiled. 'See, you're getting smarter already!'
A Sunday School teacher of pre-schoolers was concerned that his students might be a little confused about Jesus Christ because of the Christmas season emphasis on His birth. He wanted to make sure they understood that the birth of Jesus occurred a long time ago, that He grew up, etc. So he asked his class, 'Where is Jesus today?' Steven raised his hand and said, 'He's in heaven.' Mary was called on and answered, 'He's in my heart.'

Little Johnny, waving his hand furiously, blurted out, 'I know! I know! He's in our bathroom The whole class got very quiet, looked at the teacher, and waited for a response. The teacher was completely at a loss for a few very long seconds. He finally gathered his wits and asked Little Johnny how he knew this. And Little Johnny said, 'Well...every morning, my father gets up, bangs on the bathroom door, and yells 'Jesus Christ, are you still in there?''

An Easy Enough Mistake

A man and a woman were having dinner in a fine restaurant. Their waitress, taking another order at a table a few paces away noticed that the man was slowly sliding down his chair and under the table, with the woman acting unconcerned.
The waitress watched as the man slid all the way down his chair and out of sight under the table. Still, the woman dining across from him appeared calm and unruffled, apparently unaware that her dining companion had disappeared. After the waitress finished taking the order, she came over to the table and said to the woman, "Pardon me, ma'am, but I think your husband just slid under the table." The woman calmly looked up at her and replied firmly, "No he didn't. He just walked in the door."

Burst Pipe

A pipe burst in a doctor's house. He called a plumber. The plumber arrived, unpacked his tools, did mysterious plumber-type things for a while, and handed the doctor a bill for $600.
The doctor exclaimed, "This is ridiculous! I don't even make that much as a doctor!"
The plumber waited for him to finish and quietly said, "Neither did I when I was a doctor."


1. The nicest thing about the future is it always starts tomorrow.
2. Money will buy a fine dog but only kindness will make him wag his tail.
3. If you don't have a sense of humor, you probably don't have any sens e at all.
4. Seat belts are not as confining as wheelchairs.
5. A good time to keep your mouth shut is when you're in deep water.
6.. How come it takes so little time for a child who is afraid of the dark to become a teenager who wants to stay out all night?
7. Business conventions are important because they demonstrate how many people a company can operate without.
8. Why is it that, at class reunions, you feel younger than everyone else looks?
9. Scratch a dog and you'll find a permanent job.
10. No one has more driving ambition than the boy who wants to buy a car.
11. There are no new sins; the old ones just get more publicity.
12. There are worse things than getting a call for a wrong number at 4AM: It could be a right number.
13. No one ever says "It's only a game" when their team's winning.
14. I've reached the age where the happy hour is a nap.
15. Be careful reading the fine print. There's no way you're going to like it.
16. The trouble with bucket seats is not everybody has the same size bucket.
17. Do you realize in about 40 years we'll have millions of old ladies running around with tattoos? (And rap music will be the Golden Oldies!)
18. Money can't buy happiness - but somehow it's more comfortable to cry in a Corvette than in a Yugo.
19. After 70 if you don't wake up aching in every joint, you are probably dead.

Blind Golfers

A pastor, a doctor and an engineer were waiting one morning for a particularly slow group of golfers. The engineer fumed, "What's with these guys? We must have been waiting for 15 minutes!" The doctor chimed in, "I don't know, but I've never seen such ineptitude! "The pastor said, "Hey, here comes the greens keeper. Let's have a word with him."

"Hi, George. Say, what's with that group ahead of us? They're rather slow, aren't they?"

The greens keeper replied, "Oh, yes, that's a group of blind firefighters. They lost their sight saving our clubhouse from a fire last year, so we always let them play for free anytime."

The group was silent for a moment.

The pastor said, "That's so sad. I think I will say a special prayer for them tonight."

The doctor said, "Good idea. And I'm going to contact my ophthalmologist buddy and see if there's anything he can do for them."

The engineer said, "Why can't these guys play at night?"

Area 51

You've heard of the Air Force's ultra-high-security, super-secret base in Nevada, known simply as "Area 51?" Well, late one afternoon, the Air Force folks out at Area 51 were surprised to see a Cessna landing at their "secret" base. They immediately impounded the aircraft and hauled the pilot into an interrogation room. The pilot's story was that he took off from Vegas, got lost, and spotted the Base just as he was about to run out of fuel. The Air Force started a full FBI background check on the pilot and held him overnight during the investigation.By the next day, they were finally convinced that the pilot really was lost and wasn't a spy. They gassed up his airplane, gave him a terrifying "you-did-not-see-a-base" briefing, complete with threats of spending the rest of his life in prison, told him Vegas was that-a-way on such-and-such a heading, and sent him on his way. The next day, to the total disbelief of the Air Force, the same Cessna showed up again. Once again, the MP's surrounded the plane... only this time there were two people in the plane. The same pilot jumped out and said, "Do anything you want to me, but my wife is in the plane and you have to tell her where I was last night!"

All out

Two men are occupying booths in a public restroom, when one calls to the other, "There is no toilet paper over here--do you have any over there?" The second man replies, "No, sorry, I don't seem to have any, either." The first man then asks, "Well, do you have a magazine or newspaper?" The second man says, "No, sorry!" The first man pauses, then inquires, "Do you have change for a twenty?"

Mounted Cop

There was a cop on his horse waiting to cross the road when a little boy on his new shiny bike stopped beside him. ''Nice bike,'' the cop said, ''did Santa bring it to you?'' ''Yep,'' the little boy said, ''he sure did!'' The cop looked at the bike and while handing the boy a $20 ticket he said, ''Next year, tell Santa to put a license plate on the back of it.'' To go along with the cop, the little boy said, ''Nice horse you got there sir, did Santa bring it to you?'' ''Yes, He sure did,'' said the cop. The little boy looked up at the cop and said, ''Next year tell Santa to put the dick underneath the horse instead of on top.''

Cartwheeling for Cash

One day a little girl came running into her house yelling, "Mommy, I got five dollars!" The mother was curious, so she asked her child where she got the five dollars from. The little girl replied, ''Tommy down the street gave me five dollars for doing cartwheel while he sat in the tree. The mother told her daughter, "Don't you know that Tommy is just trying to see your panties." ''OOOOhhhh'' said the little girl. The next day the little girl came running into the house yelling, "Mommy, I got ten dollars. The mother asked, "Where did you get the ten dollars from?" The little girl replied, "Tommy down the street gave me ten dollars for doing a cartwheel while he sat up in the tree and laughed." The mother replied, "Didn't I tell you that he is...'' Before the mother could finish, the little girl said, ''Wait Mommy. I tricked him, I didn't wear any panties today.''

Sunday School

Little Mary was not the best student in Sunday School. Usually she slept through the class. One day the teacher called on her while she was napping, ''Tell me, Mary, who created the universe?'' When Mary didn't stir, little Johnny, an altruistic boy seated in the chair behind her, took a pin and jabbed her in the rear. ''God Almighty !'' shouted Mary and the teacher said, ''Very good'' and Mary fell back to sleep. A while later the teacher asked Mary, ''Who is our Lord and Savior?'' But Mary didn't even stir from her slumber. Once again, Johnny came to the rescue and stuck her again. ''Jesus Christ!'' shouted Mary and the teacher said, ''Very good,'' and Mary fell back to sleep. Then the teacher asked Mary a third question, ''What did Eve say to Adam after she had her twenty-third child?'' And again, Johnny jabbed her with the pin. This time Mary jumped up and shouted, ''If you stick that damn thing in me one more time, I'll break it in half!'' The Teacher fainted.

Great Idea

I have come up with the ultimate solution to the earth's environmental concerns. Let's gather up all of the landfill wastes, industrial wastes, nuclear wastes, hazardous wastes, and biomedical wastes and deposit them in some small savings and loan. Then, suddenly they will disappear.

A doctor in a clinic was interviewing a new patient. "If I find an operation necessary," he asked, "would you have the money to pay for it?" "Listen, Doc," replied the man, "if I didn't have the money, would you find the operation necessary?"

As an airplane is about to crash, a female passenger jumps up frantically and announces, "If I'm going to die, I want to die feeling like a woman." She removes all her clothing and asks, "Is there someone on this plane who is man enough to make me feel like a woman?" A man stands up, removes his shirt and says, "Here, iron this!".

The new employee stood before the paper shredder looking confused. "Need some help?" a secretary, walking by, asked.

"Yes," he replied, "how does this thing work?" "Simple," she said, taking the fat report from his hand and feeding it into the shredder.

"Thanks, but where do the copies come out?"

Three nuns were talking. The first nun said, "I was cleaning in Father's room the other day and do you know what I found? A bunch of pornographic magazines."

"What did you do?" the other nuns asked.

"Well, of course I threw them in the trash."

The second nun said, "Well, I can top that. I was in Father's room putting away the laundry and I found a bunch of condoms!" "Oh my!" gasped the other nuns. "What did you do?" they asked. "I poked holes in all of them!" she replied. The third nun fainted.

Exxon-Mobil reported record earnings of $36 billion. Here’s the amazing part. They still can’t afford to pay somebody to clean the restrooms!

A young man finds the woman of his dreams and asks her to marry him. He tells his mother he wants her to meet his fiance, but he wants to make a bit of a game out of it. He says he'll bring the girl over with two other women and see if his mother can guess which is the one he wants to marry. His mother agrees to the game. That night, he shows up at his mother's house with three beautiful young ladies. They all sit down on the couch, and everyone has a wonderful evening talking and getting to know each other. At the end of the evening, the young man asks his mother, 'OK, Mom, which one is the woman I want to marry?' Without any hesitation at all, his mother replies, 'The one in the middle.' The young man is astounded. 'How in the world did you figure it out?' 'Easy,' she says. 'I don't like her.'
You don't have to be insane to be a liberal, but it helps.

A man was driving down a country road one day at 45 miles per hour when suddenly he noticed a 3-legged turkey running at the same speed beside his truck. Though he thought this odd, the man decided to speed up so he wouldn't cause an accident with the turkey. The man sped up to 55 miles per hour, but low and behold, so did the 3-legged turkey. The man then sped up to 65 miles per hour only to again be equaled in speed by the 3-legged turkey. As the man watched in amazement, the turkey suddenly made a sharp left turn and took off down a side road toward a small farm. The man quickly also made the left turn and followed the turkey to the small farm, parking out front.
Looking around the man found the farmer around back in the midst of many 3-legged turkeys. After greeting the farmer, the man asked him why he was raising 3-legged turkeys. "Well we figure," said the farmer, "that with an average family of 3 people, only 2 can have a turkey leg with an average turkey. But with a three legged turkey, each member of the family can enjoy a turkey leg for of their own on Thanksgiving." "That's pretty wise," said the man, who then asked "Well how do your 3-legged turkeys taste?"
I don't know," said the farmer. "We've never been able to catch one."



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Selling Found Gold
Posted by: GeorgeStreeter on Sunday, August 10, 2008 - 07:20 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Selling Found Gold

Being new to water hunting with a metal detector & gold ownership. It got exciting when gold went over $500 an ounce. I got greedy and  made a mistake of selling scrap gold to an unrecommeded  refinery near Lynn, MA  and  I feel, I got ripped off .

I asked Chris & Ken where they sold their gold?  Chris of Squim, WA and Ken of Greenfield, MA said they sold their found  gold jewelry for 95% of gold price to Midwest Refineries in Waterford, MI.  www.midwestrefineries.com    I tried Midwest and was unhappy they did not reurn any stones. I asked  Goldmaster & he suggested  ARA  http://aragold.com/  who returns stones and when processed,.paid 98% of  market price,   I sent ARA 2 batches and was happy, however  felt the payment received from the third batch, was wrong.  I called and suggested  a mistake. They sent an additional $694.  They suggested in future,  I acid test my gold, instead of relying on the electronic gold tester I was using.

Now, some friends sell me their found gold and I pay up to 75% of the market price. 

Happy Hunting
George "Sea Hunter" Streeter



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Pockets Full of Gold
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, June 26, 2008 - 12:26 PM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Pockets Full of Gold

By Chris Valerio

What an exciting treasure hunting vacation! That is an understatement, as this last treasure hunting adventure put a capital letter A in adventure. An adventure can turn out good or bad, and on this adventure a little of both. So there is some good news to report and also some bad too. Guess that’s what makes an adventure an adventure, and I wouldn’t have it any other way! One simply has to take both the good and bad, knowing in the end, one has fulfilled another treasure hunting dream come true.

This trip of mixed blessings was planned as another return to the Caribbean Island of Guadeloupe, this June 3rd thru 12. Guadeloupe is a Department of France and has always provided a bounty of gold jewelry from the sea, for determined treasure hunters. Most of the gold jewelry found here is 18K, as the locals do not like a lesser percentage of gold. Remember 18K is 75% pure gold! Any item found with less gold such as 14K (58% gold), was more than likely lost by a visiting tourist to the island. There was enough 18K to be found on this trip, that even us treasure hunters frowned on found 14K! Are we spoiled or what?

For this adventure George Streeter invited myself, Bill Mitchell, Don Foster and newcomer David Hawkins to search for gold in the sea. David is a retired LA Sheriff and somewhat new to Caribbean shallow water detecting. The 5 of us would share most expenses, making such a trip rather pleasantly affordable. The biggest expense on this trip would be our airfare. For me round trip from Seattle Washington was some $1,100. Located way out West, I pay the most for airfare and usually try to match some of my flights with that of the others, so that we all arrive and depart our destination as a group. But this time that was not possible and I did not fly American as usual, but with Alaska and Air France. David was able to get the same Miami to Guadeloupe Air France flight as I, and we were scheduled to arrive in Guadeloupe just minutes after George, Don and Bill flying American. That worked out pretty good, only on the way to Guadeloupe we had to make a scheduled stop in Haiti. Air France did not exactly make that clear to us. When landing in Haiti, one could see miles of shanty-town! Obviously not an inviting place for Americans! But we remained on the plane, then after about an hour were back on track to Guadeloupe. I guess Air France services Haiti daily. A nice touch of Air France is that they still serve meals and beverages, including fine French wine on their flights. Dave and I actually received 2 complimentary meals on that flight! Seattle is a long way from the Caribbean, but finally we touched down in Guadeloupe, and all my daily stress and worries vanished. Within minutes we passed immigration, had our luggage and whisked right through customs in nearly the blink of an eye!

We found George, Don and Bill waiting for us at SIXT, our car rental company. It is a good thing I made it to Guadeloupe because our Peugeot rental van was in my name! Before long we were loaded-up and bound for our bungalows. This was the best van I have ever rented. New, roomy and very fuel stingy! SIXT offered the best rental price by far, and I never expected a new vehicle to boot! Although I have now been to Guadeloupe several times, finding our way from the airport always seems confusing. Once I get on the highway to our Bungalows, then I know where I am and can find my way around the island. But getting on the right highways can be tricky. Thank Goodness Bill was along with his great sense of direction. I drove and Bill directed! Between the 2 of us we found our way and made our bungalows in no time flat! Which was a good thing because the bungalow manager was waiting for us with the keys in hand, and wanted to go home. Because of a little mix-up with our required bed count, Dave and I shared a room, George and Bill another, and Don got his own room for one night, until management could move another bed for Don into my room the next day. Each man needs his own bed and that eventually worked out rather well for us.

Like kids in a candy store we could hardly wait to go detecting for gold in the sea. We had a few hours of daylight left and so we did, and some of us actually struck first gold! I found a gold band and George and Bill did so too! What a great way to start our trip, with found gold and within hours of our arrival! At dusk we showered-up and made a B-line for dinner. We were hungry treasure hunters and nothing was going to get in our way here! Our restaurant of choice is less than a block from our bungalows, and serves delicious French and Creole style gourmet food at great prices! Oh by the way, a beautiful beach with palm trees, white sand and crystal clear blue-green water and loaded with gold, is a mere stones throw away from our bungalows! So this set-up is great. Plus there is a wonderful bakery, deli, general store, pay phones and bank just round the corner- sweet! I should mention that calling the United States from Guadeloupe is very inexpensive, if you purchase a pre-paid calling phone card, Allo Card, from one of the stores round the corner. One can choose several hours of payphone use time for around 10 Euros or less! Since Guadeloupe is a Department of France, Euros are used there and US Dollars are not accepted. At this time 1 Euro equals about $1.60 US.

The restaurant owner and staff know us and provide a welcome atmosphere for us. That night our Spirits were high and full of expectations. We were jovial, toasting ice cold beer, made great conversation and feasted on delicious food at our reserved table for “The Americans“! Yes, the fun Americans were back in town, but soon the Gods of Sleep caught up with us, and we made our way to bedtime. Little did I know it would turn out to be one of the unluckiest nights of my life! I felt great, but was very tired. I had a touch of jetlag and lost several hours traveling from Seattle. We planned on getting up early the next morning, so it was straight to 7th Heaven. Dave beat me to the punch and I had one more thing to do before finally retiring for the night. There was a hungry kitten at our door and I decided to feed him some beef jerky from the States. I have a soft-spot for animals in need, and kitty chowed-down like no tomorrow. With that task accomplished I wished my new little friend good night, shut and locked the door, and was out like a light with dreams of gold. Then…

Man, I was out of it. At about some time around 3 AM, I barely awoke to Dave declaring that Bill was in our room. I did not think much of it at the time because Bill has said he would wake us up and I thought it must be our 5 AM revelry. I looked over towards the door in a groggy half-sleep and saw that it was ajar and open! I was so stupefied and out of it, I did not even wonder why our door was open and fell right back to sleep as Dave must have too. I was simply too tired and there was no way Bill was going to get me up that early! What a failure and oversight on my part! I have never been that way before and am often accused by others of being overly cautious and aware of my surroundings. But on that night I was simply out of it. I was on a treasure hunting vacation and I had foolishly let my guard down at the wrong time. As it turns out, that was not Bill in our room, but was a thief! It was still dark and Dave could not quite make him, the intruder out. Somehow Dave woke up, saw the thief, and thought it was Bill. But it was not. This was Dave’s first trip with us and he did not know game plan. He didn’t really give a second thought as to why Bill was in our room, and thought that’s how we did things when it was time to get up. Unfortunately for me I had started to unpack my belongings the night before and the thief got most everything. He got my cash, camera, cell phone, passport, drivers license and more. About a $2,500 plus loss! All while I was sleeping! He did not get my detectors though and perhaps because Dave had woken up? The thief even took things right by my head from my nightstand. What a horrible feeling! I was at the mercy of this man and could have been killed! How could this happen? Well while I thought I locked our door, I did not realize the deadbolt had to be turned fully around twice to lock. I had turned it only one time and the door was still unlocked! I guess this is some European design? The thief walked right in! More than likely he returned several times, systematically cleaning out the room! That is until Dave partially awoke. I simply can not describe in words how I felt the next morning. I was angry but felt so violated too! At first I thought the others were playing a well deserved prank on me, but as much as I wished for that it was not the case. I was robbed and to make a horrible and long story short, I had some big problems with no ID and no cash and credit cards! What a mess. Luckily I was with good friends who helped out with money. I had to meet with a US Counsel who just happened to be on the Island by chance, to try and straighten out my lost passport situation. For several days I was not sure if I was ever going to be able to board my return flight home without any ID! I had to cancel all my documents in a foreign country where French is spoken, make a police report where they spoke no English whatsoever, and it was a living Hell for some time! I found out later this style of robbery happens often there. It is now quite common throughout the Caribbean. The Counsel told me they usually gas the room first with chloroform, then systematically steal everything while their victims are knocked-out! I do not know for sure if we were gassed, but that would explain why I felt like I was in La La Land, and not the least concerned why our door was open in the wee hours of the morning! This is really the first time in my life that I felt helpless and victimized! The Counsel advised that one should tie a glass coke bottle on a string to the door, so if it is opened, a loud noise would be made. This whole ordeal tried to ruin my trip, and for some reason only my personal belongings were stolen. To lay this to rest, I do not think the French police really care, and that our bungalow manager should have warned us, since this happens regularly. But he didn’t and I simply did not know whom to believe and trust there anymore. Who knows whom is involved for a cut, and I was told I would never see any of my belongings again, even if recovered!

Well I learned some important lessons here. I also realized how we really own nothing but for a short while. Material possessions can slip into and through our fingers from one day to the next. I just about could have cried, but also realized things could have been much worse. That thief had a lucky night. Nearly everything went his way. We were nearly out cold and there was stuff for the stealing. But perhaps he does not know just how lucky he was- he has no idea what would have happened to him had I awoken with my senses about me! Perhaps one day that thief and I may meet and I’ll get a chance to return the favor! I offered a local street gang a sizeable reward for information and tried some other tricks to catch the thief, without success. Since this was our first vacation day, I also held hopes that the Gendarmerie might still come up with something. There was only one thing left to do. That was to make lemonade, and I did that to the best of my ability. I kept reminding myself, there was gold to be found in Guadeloupe!

As a group we shook-off the robbery like a wet dog and for the next several days hit our favorite beaches in search of gold! While I never did get the mishap fully out of my mind, I still had a wonderful time with my friends in Guadeloupe. There really are only a handful of secret beaches we detect there, so some of them we visited on multiple occasions. 4 or 5 experienced treasure hunters armed with Minelab Excalibur’s can really clean house! Despite being off to such a poor start, I never expected to find as much gold as I did on this trip! But I did and so did my Mates! For shallow water Caribbean treasure hunting the Minelab Excalibur 800 is King of detectors! I know as I have tried many other detectors there on past trips, and nothing finds gold for me like an Excalibur. I can say the Excalibur is nearly a gold magnet! I had brought another modified pulse detector along to try on this trip. With it I found 3 pieces of gold and hundreds of junk items. The rest of the nearly 4 ounces of gold jewelry I found was with my trusty Excalibur. Even newcomer David soon realized that his 2 expensive pulse machines were no match for the Excalibur, he borrowed from Bill and Don! As a matter of fact Dave is selling his most expensive pulse detector and will replace it with an Excalibur. In the Caribbean we all use Excalibur’s and find lots of gold! If you want an Excalibur, George Streeter of Streeter Electronics is the man to see for the best deal on the planet! Plus George will fill your ears with valuable treasure hunting knowledge, and may even invite you on a treasure hunting vacation too! Excalibur’s simply pay for themselves many times over!

On this treasure hunting adventure, Bill was the Gold King and dug more than 4 ounces of the yellow stuff! We think he might have a more sensitive machine than the rest of us? Well, that is our explanation and excuse. Really, Bill is just that good and may be one of the best water hunters alive! George and I about tied in Gold finds, Don came in 4th with 16 nice finds, and Dave did pretty good for a beginner. We all found plenty of gold this time around! I’m quite happy with that. One heavy Gents gold ring I found, caught the eye of Don. It obviously was a special custom one of a kind piece of 18K or higher purity! It is a squarish ring with a small diamond in each corner, an oval glowing moon stone set in the center and constellations engraved on the sides! What a ring! Don liked it so much, and since I needed to recover some of my losses, I sold the ring to Don at a very fair price. Don is now smiling as the ring now has a new home! And speaking of rings, Bill found a ladies diamond ring that looked very expensive. We heard a few years back that a ladies $50,000 ring had been lost in the water at this particular resort! So for a while we all thought that Bill had found that ring and that his year had been made! But after testing with an electronic diamond tester back at the bungalow Bill discovered the ring was cosmetic jewelry- or so Bill says, as I never actually witnessed the test! The beautiful white gold and jewel encrusted ring sure looked real to me!

Besides finding much gold daily, each morning we would stop at one of the many roadside French style bakeries for fresh pastries and coffee. As a coffee shop owner, I can say the espresso coffee in Guadeloupe is simple, yet delicious! Several times for lunch we would stop at our favorite deli for scrumptious sandwiches on fresh baked French baguettes, or have rotisserie roasted chicken! Why a cold can of The Real Thing never went down so good! After lunch I enjoyed a fine pastry dessert. Refueled, we then detected in the sea for treasure until dusk. We ate dinner at our favorite restaurant "Le Lucullus", every night. I really think the restaurant owners are going to miss us! The French people really love to eat and converse for hours. Perhaps their ways are beginning to rub off on us, as every night our dinners lasted more than 2 hours, consisting of delicious food, drink and camaraderie! My good treasure hunting friends made more than half of the trip for me! We had a wonderful time, made more fond memories and filled our pockets full of gold! Can it get any better? Well... as men we simply could not notice how beautiful the women of Guadeloupe are- on the inside and out! They seem very comfortable with their physical bodies and like to wear very little. They do not seem to mind when a man tastefully enjoys the “Eye Candy” presented, and clearly consider a smile and “wow-wee” looks a compliment. Women just feel free in Guadeloupe to express themselves and they often do by going topless at the beach! At times there seem to be as many topless women of all ages as there are men! And few locals take any real notice as it just seems natural there. At times my blood started to boil, but gold fever always got the better of me and I continued detecting upon my merry way! It did help to be in the cooler water though! It is difficult to describe the feeling of seeing gold in your scoop, glittering in the Caribbean sunlight! Happy and just makes you just want to find more gold, no matter how little clothes the natives are not wearing! Yes, I can vouch that gold fever can be really hot!

Despite the bounty of gold and good times, that dark cloud was hanging over my head. Would I be able to leave the country? Obviously I did, but for a while I was not quite sure I would? The US State Department told me I might have to stay in Guadeloupe 8 to 10 weeks, waiting for a new passport! The US Counsel said I might have to fly to Barbados somehow for a new passport, and that I could take a loan out with Uncle Sam to pay for it! I realized that none seemed to know what really would happen to me and while the Counsel stated that he doubted that Air France would let me board for home, I utilized my better judgment and went to parley with Air France at the airport in Guadeloupe. For a while it did not look too good for me, but then I found a helpful plain clothes airport policeman who smiled and told Air France I could fly! He really had no authority to let me fly, but his word was as good as gold, and that is all I cared about at the time! I could fly home! When the day came for us to leave this Island Paradise, we said our goodbyes at the airport and I indeed boarded my flight home. Again Dave shared my Air France flight home and also a motel room in Miami. But then there was the Haiti Incident! Again our flight made a stop-over in Haiti. Only this time we had to deboard the plane for some reason, then reboard again. Dave and I got off the plane following the other passengers, and waited in what felt like a Third World Nation airport! A black & white public television had some sort of politician on, screaming his mouth off about something! It sounded rather crazy and like brainwashing! It was then that I realized I had no passport and could end up being detained in that country! When it was time to reboard I was asked for my passport. There was little I could do but to sternly declare “I do not have one!”. With that I got a snappy hand motion to pass, and after a pat-down body search boarded my plane- Thank God, as it could have gone sour real fast! They could have detained me if they wanted to! When I approached US customs in Miami, I was prepared for hours of questioning. Instead I was told to relax as I was now home and in America. Why with hearing that, I could have raised Old Glory, danced a jig and sung our National Anthem! The US Counsel in Guadeloupe had promised me that he would notify US Customs to expect me. But he had not. He also said he was going to cancel my US passport, but had not done that either! Despite this I walked right through Customs faster than Dave with all his proper documents! I must have an honest face? I got through with zero delays! The toughest time I had was boarding my Miami Alaska flight home to Seattle. But eventually boarded that flight too and landed softly in Seattle. Someone must have been looking after me? It is difficult to believe that I traveled from halfway round the world and from foreign lands, got through US Customs without a hitch, all with no ID whatsoever, and these days! But I did. Clearly I must research better exactly what one does when in my situation? That information may make for another Gazette article in the near future, as it is vital knowledge for American treasure hunters traveling abroad.

I have sold my recent Guadeloupe finds as scrap gold to a Refiner that I trust. This was done to help offset the robbery. It comes close. Despite the robbery and difficulty getting home, I had a good time and shared many pleasant hours with my treasure hunting buddies. Why I find that I am missing them already, and am looking forward to my next treasure hunting adventure. If you have any questions about metal detecting in Guadeloupe, please contact George Streeter (Papa Georgio) Gstreeter@ne.rr.com or at his website Streeter Electronics, www.streeter.org  or me by email at cabochris@msn.com. On these trips the only thing better than having a pocket full of gold, is that we all had a pocket full of gold, as well as fulfillment in our hearts and minds. To all, may your treasures be realized!

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HUNTING SEA GOLD
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, June 26, 2008 - 12:24 PM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

HUNTING SEA GOLD

By David Hawkins


I recently had the opportunity to enjoy the company of some experienced "gold seekers", when George Streeter invited me to come along on one of his "infamous" Caribbean gold hunting adventures. Little did I know what an adventure it would be! My first surprise was the flight to the island of Guadeloupe included an "unscheduled stop" in a 3rd world country of Haiti. Air France told me nothing about that! My initial thought, "What the hell am I doing here?" After a layover, my plane proceeded and finally landed in Guadeloupe.

All kinds of thoughts were going through my head, "What is George & his group like?", "Metal detecting with complete strangers for 9 days on an island I've never heard of ?", "What could happen, would I ever return?", "Would I actually find "gold" in my scoop?". This was my first trip with George and "crew" and the possibilities were endless!

Well, needless to say, all on the trip were great. There was George, Chris, Bill and Don who had thousands of hours of metal detecting experience under their belts. I realized they knew what they were talking about! During our adventure, they treated me as an "equal" and everybody got along just fine!
Everyday included hours and hours of metal detecting in the water. It was hard work and I was having the time of my life! The thrill of finding my first gold jewelry item in my scoop was an adrenaline rush to say the least! Once "gold fever" strikes, you don't want to stop hunting. If I had a question about anything, these guys were willing to help me & had the answers. I learned SO MUCH due to the positive attitudes of my fellow gold hunters.
I learned that the preferred detector is the Minelab Excalibur 800. It leads you to the gold! My J W Fishers and my White's Pulse detectors couldn't match the sensitivity of the Excalibur in the hunt for the precious finds!

I plan on listing my detectors on EBAY and buy an Excalibur from George at a later date. Bill was nice enough to let me use his backup Excalibur II 800 and it worked great! I found more gold with that machine. than with any other. I was hooked!

For my first trip, George said I did well, because I found 7 gold jewelry items (6 more then he thought I’d find). He said the dream is coming on one of his treasure hunting trips and 2nd part of the dream is to find several gold items. Usually, on the first trip, one does not find much gold. I also found numerous silver jewelry items, several worthless Franc’s & good Euros. I lost count of dollar number, a Euro is worth $1.64 US, because my interested was now in finding more gold! I enjoyed everyone’s company, the "thrill of finding gold in my scoop", the good at Le Lucullus and the entire trip! Would I go again, in a heartbeat and without hesitation! The experience was GREAT! I hope they will have me join them again for another of "George's Caribbean Adventures", the sooner the better! Special thanks to George, Chris, Bill and Don for a great time!



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BONE 15, National Hunt Treasure Chest Winner
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, June 26, 2008 - 12:24 PM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

BONE 15, National Hunt Treasure Chest Winner

Submitted by “New Hampshire Bob” Copyright 2008

In response to a question on a forum from “Mackintoc”

forgot.... I didn't find any tokens.........I believe 8 of the 10 tokens were found.....I never heard what the tokens where made of so I hunted in relic mode just in case......this eliminates small iron and small foil?....newbie to the 250.....coming to the end of the hunt with the 8 min. mark to go I swing like the nut case I can be when it comes to competition and metal detecting fool I am........zoinks!.....end of game!........So my arm is sore and back not so good......I put detector in truck and marched back to tent.....now we get to get in line and get a ticket for the big draw.......grand prize $1000 dollar treasure chest. I got behind a girl named Tamara (“Topcat”) and another guy cut in front of me....no problem chuck....I am in no big hurry to drive home empty handed. I swear I tried my hardest and no tokens so I knew I would go home empty handed.....Still had a great time due to the excitement and all......but stayed for the drawings of the tokens found.......what a gas....I can't remember it exact but there was a guy who won a gold coin....NICE!....and then another guy won a gold detector and he didn't want another detector and the guy that won the gold coin said hey I will trade ya.....He did.....lol.......so on and so on...the same old guy found 2 tokens( in which I passed a few times sharing conversation with him, Nice Guy) and he got a nice DetectorPro water resistant detector.....he kept that.......but people where making him offers.....lol.....I finally saw these tokens and they were thin coppers....sadly I felt I failed all weekend and was tired of bad coffee at the hotel and just wanted to go home......I had fun but just wanted to win something even if it was a hat or tee shirt. Bob was to my amazement a very funny guy...but when he had to be all business he played his part like a champ. I figured him to be straight lace and all business but I got to see and hear his humor which made the trip nice. He even gave me a Minelab coffee cup...cool....see, I am easy to Mariposa.....it don’t take much to make me happy......LOL......anyways....so all the detectors and prizes were given away to the token finders.....so now I am thinking it's time to get ready to head out....but I forgot about the ticket for the treasure chest.......and the guy started out with 8.....My first thought was...yeah all the #'s start with 8........then he says 9. Now I think ok I have 89- so I have a 1 in 10 chance to win.......LOL.......yeah right!......Then I said, hey wait a minute! (to myself) Its my birthday weekend and I must think positive ........come on VIRG!!!!!! say 5 David, say five!!.......he then says 5......That’s ME!....895.......I WON!.......I never looked at the treasure chest before hand and hoped a hat or tee-shirt was there........lol....... I got more than I needed.... Not to mention a free subscription to a couple of Thing mags, .a pinpointer, 2 diff. type flashlights, one to put on forehead and one to mount to detector rod....how cool is that...an awesome real leather bag to carry my stuff, a all purpose screw driver with attachments, 2 scales, one for pocket and one for home, a coin case to display and protect, a book, Killer bee head phones( will go good with the new purchase) a Lesche digger(always wanted one) and tons of old coins and silver and gold jewelry........but me being me.......I really like the treasure chest, it come in!!!.......Nice!.......What a trip this has been!.....Thanks again Bob and George & all the other people involved and hope to wake up and smell the coffee and get pinched to make sure it is all real!.



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Second best Sea coin
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, June 26, 2008 - 12:23 PM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

Second best Sea coin

Since starting my metal detecting adventures to the Caribbean Islands in the late 80s, I am always hoping to be to find a Piece of Eight, Gold Doubloon, or a silver dollar size coin at least 150 years old.

My best “pirate era“ silver coin was found in a little ocean pool in Bathsheba, Barbados. The year before someone stole my glasses while detecting. So now I was leaving them in the hotel. It wasn’t until I got back to the hotel room and my glasses before I could see, I had recovered someone’s *lucky 1718, two Reale coin. *because it wasn’t corroded, I believe it had been carried in someone’s pocket.

Now the second  best

Tides and currents change & usually every beach goes through a change between my visits. On June 12, 2008, I was in my swim suit, detecting with my new Minelab Excalibur II 800 underwater metal detector at a French nude beach I was detecting in an area full of junk signals. WHAM BANG! & I was hearing the loudest signal ever. I dig every signal and after many attempts of digging this one, I was ready to walk away, thinking it was a aluminum can. I remembered Billy’s $2,000 gold chain. One more dig became 3 & then no signal over the hole. I looked in my scoop, with the old vegetation & dirty stones, was a round black disc, the size & weight of a silver dollar. I put it into my finds pouch, to check out later & filled in the hole Later from a beautiful, French lady in a topless bathing suit, who asked if I had found anything, I learned the coin was a 1800s. silver 5 Franc coin, which was once attached to a necklace. It was pirate era & similar to a Piece of Eight, where one could cut off a 2 bit piece for a small purchase. My 1829 “I” mint mark coin was clear enough to identify & date.

I had come in 3rd in the number of gold finds, and the 1829 I silver 5 Franc, made my vacation. I plan to again fit it to a another heavy silver necklace found in Guadeloupe.

New Hampshire Bob has photograph my  old coins (1718 Spanish 2 Reale & 1829 “I”  5 Franc) & pictures are posted under Sea Hunter, at the NorthEast Metal Detecting Forum and with Chris Valerio's article..

ST8.JPG

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ST5.JPG



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Local Forum
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, June 26, 2008 - 12:23 PM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Local Forum

How many of you enjoy chatting over the internet? Most would I guess, and those that don’t usually prefer to read what others have to say. You are called Lurkers. The name sounds worse than the actual deed itself.

When looking for a place to visit, we try finding a Metal detecting forum or a place where we can check out what’s new on the market. That can be as many 1 to 5 or 6 forums. I visit at least 3 forums a night, that’s enough for me to keep track of.

I recently started visiting the forum at Streeter Electronics and found it has not seen much activity over the years. Some of this is due to George not being a forum type person. The rest is due to lack of publicity and involvement. We put our heads together and decided to come up with a local forum based right here in South Western New Hampshire. Not Ohio or Virginia or even Maine but right here, centrally located in the oldest part of the United States of America.

If all the readers of the Gazette should visit this forum just once, we would be off to a rolling start. What to talk about you say? Well, what do you talk about on the other forums? How about the B.O.N.E show? Did you have fun? The natural hunt? What did you find and should we do it again? Your daily finds? Type of machine you use and why you like it over the last one you had.

Update

If you haven’t noticed yet and I’m pretty sure most of you haven’t, we now have a whole new forum, separate from the Streeter Electronics site.

It is already off to a great start, and should be a success. There is not another forum based in central New England that its purpose is to highlight the great old finds of the oldest part of our Country. In short. This is OUR chance to shine. To draw a crowd from all over the Country and beyond. To show the world the early American Artifacts and Relics of our Local Area.

So here is your new home. northeastmetaldetectingforum.com Come on in and say Hello.

NH Bob



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EARLY RAILROAD TREASURES
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, June 26, 2008 - 12:23 PM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

The Western Treasure Hunter

EARLY RAILROAD TREASURES

by: Dean Adams

During the 1960s I lived not far from the site of the historic completion of the first transcontinental railroad in Utah. This was before my metal detecting days.

The Central Pacific Railroad from the West and the Union Pacific from the east met on May 19, 1869 at Promontory Point. It was celebrated with the driving of a golden spike.

I was fascinated by the stories my work friends told about bottle hunting. My recent reading about the westward expansion and the fantastic surge of railroad building after the Civil War explained why so many bottles were found along the railroad right-of-way.

This has inspired my hunting partners and I to do the research required to trace the exact routes of these early railroads. Metal detecting treasures should be found if bottles are found on the surface.

Shortly following the Civil War, the Union Pacific started laying track west from Omaha Nebraska. Later, during the summer of 1869, the Kansas Pacific Railroad started laying track west from Kansas City toward Denver.

The ghost sites resulting from the construction of these two railroads are close enough to Denver for weekend hunts.

The Kansas Pacific followed the Smoky Hill Trail while the Union Pacific followed the California and Oregon Trail. These trails were migration and stage routes. Not only are the railroad ghosts available for metal detecting, but also are the stage stop sites and wagon train campgrounds.

The Union Pacific constructed its railroad while entering Colorado at an average of one and a quarter miles per day. Meanwhile the Kansas Pacific was heading toward Denver from the east. During this time the Irish tracklayers were competing to see which crew could lay the most miles of rail in one day. The record was set at just over ten miles.

The logistics support for such a large work force required end-of-track camps to be established. These were moved forward and erected at frequent intervals. Supplies for these camps were shuttled by train from storage in the terminal towns established as the railroad progressed.

The first major terminal in Colorado was Julesburg number three.. The Indian Wars were still raging after being started in 1864 by the Sand Creek Massacre. Julesburg number one, close to Fort Sedgwick, was destroyed by Indians, as were most of the stage stops along the Platte River Trail. Julesburg number two had been in existence only a short time when it was moved across the river to be on the new railroad and became Julesburg number three.

Henry Stanley, a correspondent for a St. Louis newspaper, reported that the town at this time consisted of four tents and a half finished eating-house. (Stanley later became the African explorer who found the missing Dr. Livingston.)

The Army sent soldiers to protect the railroad builders from the very beginning of the westward movement. They moved about and were on hand as needed. Different Generals, including General Custer, moved along both the Union Pacific and Kansas Pacific railroad construction lines.

The Union Pacific reached the cow town of Cheyenne Wyoming in November of 1867. Shortly afterward, Denver businessmen formed the Denver Pacific Railway and Telegraph Company. This company built the railroad connecting Denver with Cheyenne. It was completed in June of 1870.

In addition to the end-of-track camps and terminal towns, there were countless communities and whistle stops with sidings and facilities for loading lumber, cattle and farm products. These communities were within only a few miles of each other. All but a small number have become ghost sites awaiting the detectorist willing to do his research.

In the case of Julesburg number three, further research revealed the fact that it grew to be a wild and wooly town with a population of over 7000. For a short time it was the largest town in Colorado.

In February on 1881 the Union Pacific moved its telegraph office and depot three miles east to the community of Denver Junction. They renamed it Julesburg, which is the present day town by the same name. Julesburg number three was renamed Weir and it promptly went into extinction.

By studying aerial photographs and talking with older local people in Julesburg, we were able to pinpoint the exact location of Weir. It is on a ranch not far from the present Union Pacific route.

Last year we made our first trip to the site after gaining permission from the owner's representative. Although we understood local detectorist had hunted it earlier, we were pleasantly surprised by our finds. My companion found a number of three ring Minnie bullets and cartridge cases as well as vintage household relics.

Among my finds were a Union Army belt plate and a Martingale type horse decoration from that same era. I also found an eagle jacket button and a live 56-caliber carbine round.

We realize that we have only seen the tip of the iceberg, so to speak. A lot of interesting research lies ahead. Some of these ghost railroad sites are well documented while most are unknown. Although extinct, none of them have disappeared. Proof of their existence is still in the ground. This applies not only to Colorado, but also to the entire west.

By research and the use of modern technology such as the computer and the Global Positioning System (GPS), we feel that we have treasure hunting opportunities for years to come.



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LOST AND STOLEN U.S. PASSPORTS ABROAD
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, June 26, 2008 - 12:22 PM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

LOST AND STOLEN U.S. PASSPORTS ABROAD

Q. WHAT SHOULD A U.S. CITIZENS DO IF PASSPORT IS LOST OR STOLEN ABROAD?

A. Contact the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate for assistance. Phone numbers for U.S. embassies and consulates are also available in our Country Specific Information and Key Officers handbook. You will need to speak to the American Citizens Services unit of the Consular Section. If you are scheduled to leave the foreign country shortly, please provide the Consular Section with details regarding your departure schedule. Every effort will be made to assist you quickly. You will also be directed to where you can obtain the required passport photos.

If you are notified by a relative or friend that their U.S. passport has been lost/stolen, you may wish to contact Overseas Citizens Services , (202) 647-5225 at the U.S. Department of State in Washington, D.C. providing as much information about possible about the person's who needs passport services abroad. This will assist us in trying to verify the person's previous passport, clearing the person's name through the Department Passport Name Check System, and relaying this information to the U.S. embassy or consulate. Your relative/friend must apply for a new passport at the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate.

Q. WHAT ARE THE REQUIREMENTS TO OBTAIN A REPLACEMENT PASSPORT?

A. You will need to complete a new passport application . The consular officer taking an application for replacement of a lost, stolen, or misplaced passport must be reasonably satisfied as to your identity and citizenship before issuing the replacement. In virtually all cases this can be done through examination of whatever citizenship and identity documents are available, conversations with the applicant, close observation of demeanor and replies to questions asked, and discussions with the applicant’s traveling companions or contacts in the United States. Please note the new requirements for passports for minors under the age of 14 and how this will change the way passport applications for minors are handled abroad.

Q. WHAT INFORMATION WILL I NEED TO PROVIDE THE CONSULAR OFFICER?

A. You will be asked for certain information to assist in verifying your citizenship:

1. Personal Data: (including, but not limited to)

your name

date of birth

place of birth

passport number (if available)

date and place where your passport was issued

If you can provide the U.S. embassy or consulate with a photocopy of your passport identification page, that will make getting a new passport easier since your citizenship and identity information would be more readily available.

2. Affidavit Regarding Loss/Theft of the Passport/Police Report:

When you report the loss, theft, or misplacement of your passport you must execute an affidavit fully describing the circumstances under which it was lost, stolen. U.S. Department of State form DS-64 may be used for this purpose, or you may simply execute a sworn statement before the consular officer describing what happened. A police report is not mandatory but may be required when the embassy/consulate believes a problem may exist such as possible fraud. An applicant eligible to receive a passport should not be placed in circumstances to miss a plane or unreasonably delay travel to obtain a police report.

3. Citizenship Verification and Name Clearance:

The U.S. embassy/consulate will confirm your previous passport issuance through our Passport Verification System or by requesting that Overseas Citizens Services , (202) 647-5225, in the U.S. Department of State retrieve the actual passport application. The consular section will also attempt to clear your name through the U.S. Department of State name check system to ensure there is nothing preventing issuance of a U.S. passport to you (for example: outstanding arrest warrant, court order, etc.) See 22 CFR 51.70 .

4. Proof of Identity:

You will also be asked for some proof of your identity. If all your personal papers were lost or stolen with your passport, your identity can be established in a number of ways. In most cases the problem of identity is resolved quickly. It should be noted, however, that if there is any indication of possible fraud the consular officer may request additional documentation or other information.

Information From Consular Interview: The consular officer may be satisfied as to your identity based on the interview with you, or may require other information.

Identifying Witness: Persons traveling with a group or with friends, family or associates in the foreign country can have such a person execute an affidavit of an identifying witness before the consular officer. An identifying witness does not have to be a U.S. citizen.

Information From Family, Friends or Associates in the United States: If you are traveling alone and do not know anyone in the foreign country who can attest to your identity, your family, friends, or associates in the U.S. may contact the consular officer by phone or fax confirming your identity. This is usually quite informal. In emergency situations, your contacts may also communicate with the U.S. Department of State, that Overseas Citizens Services , (202) 647-5225.

Information From Previous Passport Records: If necessary, information about your identity may be obtained from your previous passport application which may have to be retrieved by Overseas Citizens Services , (202) 647-5225, in the U.S. Department of State from the Federal Records Center which is located outside of Washington, D.C.

Q. WILL THE REPLACEMENT PASSPORT BE ISSUED FOR THE FULL 10-YEAR VALIDITY PERIOD FOR AN ADULT?

A. Replacements for lost passports are normally issued for the full 10-year period of validity for adults. Occasionally, cases will arise in which the consular officer has some lingering doubt because of statements made by the applicant, or other circumstances, but is still reasonably satisfied as to identity and citizenship. If there is not time to request and receive the Department’s verification, a passport limited to 3 months may be issued. Limited passports may also be issued in cases in which an applicant has, by mistake, packed the passport with luggage being sent to another location, left the passport at home, perhaps in another country, but has to travel immediately, lost or been robbed of multiple passports in a short time span, etc. When issuing a limited passport in an emergency situation, consular officers will carefully explain to the applicant that the passport is limited for the duration of the present trip only. When the applicant returns to the United States and wishes to travel again internationally, the applicant will have to apply for a replacement passport and pay the regular fee.

Q. ARE FEES CHARGED FOR REPLACEMENT OF LOST/STOLEN PASSPORTS ABROAD?

A. The normal passport fees are collected from applicants for replacement passports. Applicants will be asked to provide names of persons they feel would be able to assist them financially if there is sufficient time. See our information about Financial Assistance to U.S. citizens abroad and Learn About Sending Money Overseas to U.S. Citizen in an Emergency .

However, if:

the applicant’s money & documents have been lost or stolen, or

the applicant is a victim of a disaster

and the applicant does not have and cannot reasonably be expected to obtain money to pay the fees before continuing travel, no passport fee will be charged and a limited validity passport will be issued. When the person applies for a full validity passport on their return to the United States the regular passport fee will be charged for the replacement passport. See the U.S. Department of State Schedule of Fees, 22 CFR 22.1

Q. CAN THE U.S. EMBASSY ISSUE A REPLACEMENT PASSPORT OVER A WEEKEND OR HOLIDAY?

A. U.S. passports are not routinely issued by U.S. embassies and consulates abroad on weekends and holidays when the embassy/consulate is closed. All U.S. embassies and consulates have an after hours duty officer available to assist with life or death emergencies of U.S. citizens abroad. Contact the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate after hours duty officer for assistance if you have an emergency need to travel. Phone numbers for U.S. embassies and consulates are also available in our Country Specific Information and Key Officers handbook.

If you are scheduled to travel directly to the United States, the duty officer may be able to assist in issuing a transportation letter to the airline and alerting U.S. Customs and Immigration to the fact that you will be attempting to enter the United States without a passport.

Duty officers must focus primary attention on life or death emergencies. Depending on the circumstances and conditions in the foreign country, it is possible that a replacement passport may not be issued until the embassy/consulate reopens for business. At that time the Consular Section will be in a better position to verify your citizenship and identity and clear your name through the Department of State name check system.



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Miners Calendar
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, June 26, 2008 - 12:22 PM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Miners Calendar

June 6-8, 2008

Amador County, California

Western Mining Artifact Collector's Show and Auction, Sutter Gold Mine. Phone (209) 267-5972 or email minerspick@goldrush.com. Complimentary copies of ICMJ’s Prospecting and Mining Journal will be available.

June 9-12, 2008

Las Vegas, Nevada

American Society of Safety Engineers' Annual Conference. Visit www.safety2008.org or www.asse.org, or phone (847) 699-2929.

June 13-15, 2008

Athol, Idaho

Northwest Treasure Hunters Club 36th Annual Hunt, Farragut State Park. Contact Packrat Bateham (509) 276-8439 packratnest@webtv.net or Sandy Witter (509) 484-7193 grannysw@comcast.net

June 15-16, 2008

Vancouver, British Columbia

Cambridge House World Gold, PGM and Diamond Investment Conference, Vancouver Convention & Exhibition Centre. Visit www.cambridgehouse.ca Complimentary copies of ICMJ’s Prospecting and Mining Journal will be available.

June 18-19, 2008

Kerrville, Texas

Handicap Children's Treasure Hunt, Texas Lion's Camp for Handicap Children. Donations of foreign coins are appreciated. Visit www.wwats.org or email Keith Wills kwills@etex.net

June 21, 2008

Estacada, Oregon

Portland Gold Prospectors Inc. & Estacada Parks and Rec. 2nd Annual Metal Detecting Event, Timber Park. Email portlandgpaa@aol.com or call Penny (503) 344-6386.

June 21-22, 2008

Georgetown, Indiana

Down 'n Dirty Diggers & Hoosier Hills Treasure Hunters Club 2-Day Hunt. Phone (812) 366-3558 or write: Mike's Metal Detector Shop, 9350 Indian Bluff Rd, Georgetown, IN 47122; or email: byrn@hughes.net. Complimentary copies of ICMJ’s Prospecting and Mining Journal will be available.

June 27-29, 2008

Ventura, California

California Federation of Mineralogical Societies 69th Annual Statewide Golden Bear Gem & Mineral Show, Seaside Park, Ventura County Fairgrounds, 10 W Harbor Blvd., Ventura. Contact Bural LaRue (909) 874-5665; email bplarue@earthlink.net; or visit www.cfmsinc.org. Complimentary copies of ICMJ’s Prospecting and Mining Journal will be available.

July 12-13, 2008

Roseville, Minnesota

Anoka Gem & Mineral Club's Rock, Gem & Mineral Show, Har Mar Mall, 2100 Snelling Ave. Phone Martha Miss (651) 459-0343.

July 18-20, 2008

Black Hawk/Central City, Colorado

Eureka Treasure Hunters Club "Rush to the Rockies" 2008 National Invitation Treasure Hunt. Visit www.eurekathc.com or phone Gary & Ada Keim (303) 427-6484. Complimentary copies of ICMJ’s Prospecting and Mining Journal will be available.

July 21-25, 2008

Golden, Colorado

"Economic Evaluation and Investment Decisions Methods" educational short course, Colorado School of Mines. Phone (800) 446-9488 ext 3321, or (303) 273-3321, or email space@mines.edu.

July 26-27, 2008

Stevens Point, Wisconsin

MidState Metal Detector Club's 12th Annual Open Hunt and State Championship, Rivers Edge Campground. Contact Steven Miller, N3091 CTY Rd B, Hancock, WI 54943; email Stmill@uniontel.net Complimentary copies of ICMJ’s Prospecting and Mining Journal will be available.

August 30-31, 2008

Foresthill, California

Mother Lode Goldhounds Foresthill Heritage Celebration, Old Foresthill Memorial Park. Visit www.foresthillchamber.org or email foresthillchamber@ftcnet.net Complimentary copies of ICMJ’s Prospecting and Mining Journal will be available.



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American-Made Products
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, June 26, 2008 - 12:22 PM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

American-Made Products

(NAPSI)-Buying products that are made in the U.S.A. means more than national pride and a strong belief in American know-how. Domestic goods are the backbone of the country’s economy, manufactured by millions of hardworking Americans who are finding it increasingly difficult to make an honest wage.

The problem? Stores are crowded with merchandise from other countries-nations whose regulatory and economic policies make it difficult (if not impossible) for the U.S. to compete in a “fair and free” marketplace. Not only that, but these goods are pushing American products off shelves, making it harder for patriotic consumers to find them.

Fortunately, consumers do have a place to go to buy items made on American soil: a Web site called MadeinUSAForever.com. Created by Todd Lipscomb, the site-which features hundreds of products ranging from clothing to tools, from toys to flags-is working to protect America’s ability to produce, create jobs and remain a world leader. The site is even offering free shipping for a limited time on orders of $40 or more; simply enter the coupon code “MadeinUSADeal.”

To learn more, visit the Web site at www.MadeinUSAForever.com.

Buying products made in the U.S.A. helps keep manufacturing jobs here at home.



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West Indies Recipes
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, June 26, 2008 - 12:21 PM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

West Indies Recipes

The West Indies, more popularly known as The Caribbean since World War II, is a large group of islands that separate the Caribbean Sea from the Atlantic Ocean and on the continent of North America. It is comprised of three main island groups, including the Bahamas in the north (over 700 islands), The Greater Antilles in the center, including the countries of Cuba, Jamaica, Haiti and the Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico and the Lesser Antilles to the southeast, divided into two groups, the Leeward Islands and Windward Islands including the islands of Barbados, St. Lucia, Martinique and Trinidad amongst the many.

Ancient Times and Influences

It is believed the first inhabitants were American Indians - Arawaks and Caribs. With the abundance of fresh fish, fruit and vegetables, these peoples probably prepared food in the most simplest of ways. Then came old Christopher Columbus (again) in 1492 laying claim for Spain, quickly followed by the English, French, Portuguese and Dutch bringing slaves from Africa.

The Europeans brought with them their farming ideas including the introduction of pigs, sheep and cattle. Indeed, one type of Caribbean cooking is known throughout the world today: the barbecue - derived from the French "de barbe a queue" which literally translates to "from beard to tail" from the practice of roasting a whole pig over an open fire.

They also imported plants such as bananas, coconuts and coffee and established plantations for the wide scale growing of sugar cane, bananas, coffee and the like. After slavery ended, indentured workers were "imported" from India and China. They too brought with them their culinary customs all of which have now fused into an exquisite and exciting gastronomic extravaganza.

Current Day Cuisine

Caribbean cooking really is a world of its own. The melting pot mix of peoples in the islands has produced a cuisine which is unrivalled throughout the world. Whilst there are a few dishes which are common throughout the islands in general, each island has it's specialties and ways of cooking. For example, in islands such as Martinique and St. Lucia, there is a strong French influence, both of them having been ruled by the French at some time during their history.

One thing that binds them all, is their use of herbs and spices, albeit in different proportions, and their reliance on fresh seafood, meats and vegetables. The one exception to this is the use of saltfish (salted cod) which is a remnant of the early European visitors who introduced it to the islands, salting having been a common method of preserving foods for the long voyages from Europe to the colonies.


Caribbean Spicy Grilled Tuna W Indian 15mins

Serves 4 Hot Fish Spices Main Course Gluten Wheat Dairy Free Eggless West Indies Caribbean

Ingredients
2 tbsp Freshly Grated Root Ginger

1 ½ teasp Ground Cumin
1 ½ teasp Ground Coriander
½ teasp Cayenne Pepper

2 tbsp Olive Oil

1 tbsp Lime Juice

Salt

4 Tuna Fillets or steaks, (about 2.5cm/1-inch thick)

Instructions

1. Preheat the grill to hot and line the grill pan with aluminum foil.

2. Place the cumin, coriander, cayenne oil, lime, ginger and salt in a shallow dish and mix well.

3. Add the fish and turn to coat on all sides then grill for 3-5 minutes on each side or to your liking. Serve immediately.


Curried Channa 30mins

Serves 4 Hot Vegetarian Accompaniment Pulses Guyana Caribbean West Indies

Ingredients

450g/1lb tinned Chick Peas

1 tbsp Cooking Oil

1 Onion, chopped

1 Garlic Clove, crushed

2 tbsp Curry Powder

1 tbsp Tomato Ketchup

Salt and Pepper

1 teasp Hot Pepper Sauce

Instructions

1. Drain chick peas, retaining 120ml/4fl.oz. of the liquid.

2. Heat the oil in a large saucepan, add the onion and garlic and fry until softened.

3. Add the curry powder and cook gently, stirring, for one minute.

4. Add the drained chick peas and fry for 5 minutes.

5. Add the remaining ingredients plus the reserved liquid, bring to the boil then reduce the heat and simmer gently for about 15 minutes. Serve hot.


Caribbean Spicy Meat Loaf

60 mins, Serves 4-6 Hot Beef herbs Vegetables Main Course Caribbean West Indies North America Nth American

Ingredients

675g/1½lbs lean Minced Beef

2 teasp Dry Mustard

1 Onion, grated

1 Egg, lightly beaten

2 teasp salt

1 teasp Fresh Thyme Leaves, chopped

20g/1oz Fresh Breadcrumbs

1 Stick Celery, finely chopped

2 Garlic Cloves, crushed

½ teasp Black Pepper

120ml/4fl.oz. Evaporated Milk

2 teasp Hot Pepper Sauce

Instructions

1. Preheat the oven to 180C, 350F, Gas Mark 4 and well grease a loaf tin.

2. Place all the ingredients in a large mixing bowl and using your hands, mix together until well blended.

3. Transfer to the greased loaf tin and bake for approximately 45 minutes. Serve hot.


Bajan Pork Roast

100mins

Serves 4-6 Hot Pork Spices Main Course Gluten Wheat Dairy Free Eggless Barbados Caribbean West Indies

Ingredients

1.3kg/3lb Boneless Pork Loin or Belly Joint

1 tbsp Ground Cumin

1 tbsp Chili Powder

1-1/2 teasp Ground Coriander

1 teasp Ground Red Chili Pepper

1-1/2 teasp Ground Black Pepper

1 teasp Ground Cinnamon

1 teasp Brown Sugar

1/2 teasp Salt

Instructions

1. Wash the loin of pork and pat dry with kitchen paper. Preheat the oven to 180C, 350F Gas Mark 4.

2. In a small bowl, mix together the remaining ingredients, blending well then rub evenly over all surfaces of the joint.

3. Place the joint in a shallow baking tin and roast for 1-1/2 to 2 hours. At the end of the cooking time, remove from the oven, cover loosely with foil and allow to rest for 10 minutes before serving.

Cuban Style Chicken

Serves 4

Ingredients

4 large chicken joints, halved

Salt and Freshly ground Black Pepper

1 tbsp Olive oil

1 Onion, chopped

1 Green Capsicum (Sweet Pepper), chopped

1 Jalapeno Pepper, deseeded and chopped

1 large Garlic clove, crushed

1 teasp Ground Cumin

1 large Tomato, chopped

1 tbsp Lime juice

1 x 400g/14oz tin Black Beans, drained

Instructions

1. Sprinkle the chicken with salt and pepper to taste.

2. Heat the oil in a large frying pan, add the chicken and sauté until browned on all sides. Remove from pan with a slotted spoon and set aside.

3. Add the onion, green pepper, jalapeno pepper and garlic and cook for a few minutes, until onions are softened.

4. Add the cumin, tomatoes, lemon juice and black beans and mix well. Return the chicken to pan, cover and simmer for 20 minutes stirring once or twice.

5. Remove the lid and continue to cook for a further 15 minutes or until the chicken is done. Serve hot.

Pumpkin Soup

Serves 4

Ingredients

1 tbsp Butter

250g/9oz Onions, finely chopped

1 Garlic Clove, crushed

450g/1lb Pumpkin, deseeded, peeled and chopped

1 large Tomato, peeled and chopped

600ml/1pt Chicken Stock

Salt and White Pepper

150ml/5 fl. oz. Single Cream

A few drops Tabasco Sauce

Instructions

1. Melt the butter in a large saucepan, add the onion and fry gently until soft and transparent.

2. Add the garlic, pumpkin, tomato and stock, bring to the boil then simmer for 30 minutes.

3. Cool slightly, then pass through a sieve or process in a blender until relatively smooth.

4. Return the soup to the pan together with the cream, Tabasco, salt and pepper. Reheat gently and serve hot.

Banana Fritters

Serves 4

Ingredients

For the Batter

50g/2oz Plain Flour

¼ teasp Salt

1 Egg

150ml/4fl.oz. Milk

¼ teasp Baking Powder

Other ingredients

2 large Bananas

Lime or lemon juice

Vegetable oil for deep frying

Sugar for tossing

Instructions

1. Make the batter by sieving the flour, baking powder and salt into a large mixing bowl. Make a well in the centre, break the egg into it and add half the milk. Gently stir to mix.

2. Continue adding the milk a little at a time and stirring constantly, until all the milk is added and the batter is smooth and lump free. Continue to beat for 5 minutes then cover the bowl with a plate or tea towel and set aside.

3. Peel and slice the bananas diagonally into 6mm/¼ inch pieces. Coat thoroughly with batter.

4. Heat the oil to 180C/350F and fry the coated banana pieces for 1-2 minutes until golden brown.

5. Drain on kitchen paper and sprinkle with lemon juice. Toss in sugar and serve hot as a dessert or at teatime.

Sweet Potato and Fish Chowder 55mins

Ingredients

1 tbsp Olive Oil
1 Onion, coarsely chopped
350g/12oz Sweet Potato, cut into 2.5cm/1 inch cubes
1 Carrot, chopped
1.1L/40fl.oz. Fresh Fish Stock
175g/6oz firm White Fish Fillets, cut into bite-size pieces
1 teasp freshly chopped Oregano
1/2 teasp freshly grated Nutmeg
120ml/4fl.oz. Single Cream

Freshly chopped coriander to garnish

Instructions

1. Heat the oil in medium saucepan, add the onion and sauté until softened.

2. Add the potato and carrot and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes then add the stock, bring to a boil, cover and simmer gently for 20 minutes or until the potato is cooked.

3. Allow the soup to cool a little then transfer to a blender or food processor and process until smooth.

4. Return the mixture to the pan, add the fish, oregano and nutmeg. Bring to a boil then reduce the heat, cover and simmer for 5 minutes or until fish is cooked.

5. Stir in the cream and continue to simmer, stirring all the time, until soup is heated through. Do not boil.

6. To serve - transfer to warmed soup bowls/plats and sprinkle with the chopped coriander. Serve hot.

Vegetable Roti

Ingredients

1.3kg/3lb Plain Flour

6 teasp Baking Powder

1 teasp Salt

450g/1lb Butter

480ml/16fl.oz. Water (approx)

Vegetable Oil

Instructions

1. Sift together the flour, baking powder and salt into a large mixing bowl.

2. Rub the butter into the flour mixture with your fingertips until it resembles fine breadcrumbs then slowly add the water and mix to form a dough.

3. Knead well and allow to stand for 30 minutes.

4. Knead the dough again then divide into 12 small balls. On a floured board, roll out each ball out as thinly as possible with a rolling pin.

5. Brush a large frying pan or flat griddle with oil and heat until hot. Cook the rotis for about 1-1/2 minutes on each side, brushing with a little vegetable oil as it cooks. Remove and drain on paper towels. Serve hot or cold as an additional accompaniment to meat stews or curries.

Bajan Beans

Serves 4

Ingredients

1 tbsp Vegetable Oil

1 medium Onion, chopped

1 Green Chili, deseeded and chopped

2 teasp Curry Powder

450ml/15fl.oz. Fresh Stock

100g/4oz Brown Rice

200g/7oz tinned Chopped Tomatoes

2 Courgettes (zucchini), chopped

½ Red Capsicum (sweet pepper), chopped

½ Green Capsicum (sweet pepper), chopped

1 x 400g/14oz tin Flageolet or Cannellini Beans

125g/5oz Sweetcorn Kernels (tinned or frozen)

2 tbsp freshly chopped Coriander

Instructions

1. Heat the oil in a saucepan, add the onion, chilies and curry powder and sauté until soft.

2. Add the rice, tomatoes and stock, mix well and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat, cover and simmer for 25 minutes, stirring from time to time.

3. Add the courgettes and peppers to the pan but don't stir them in yet, cover and cook for another 30 minutes, stirring 2 or 3 times.

4. Drain and rinse the beans then add to the pan together with the Sweetcorn . Mix well and cook gently for about 5-10 minutes.

5. To serve - stir in the coriander, transfer to a heated serving dish and serve immediately.



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Not All That's Gold, Glitters!
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, June 26, 2008 - 12:21 PM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Not All That's Gold, Glitters!

1.. In nature, most of the 92 elements never occur in the metallic state. Practically the only

ones which do are Gold, Silver, and Platinum Minerals, as well as Iron, Copper, Bismuth, Antimony, and Mercury, which are rare and seldom occur in commercial quantities. You are unlikely to see any metallic Lead, Tungsten, Molybdenum, Nickel, or Tin in any rock or ore with a magnifying glass. Finding their hidden values requires the proper equipment.

2. Many valuable ores (Nickel, Cobalt, Bismuth, Vanadium, Uranium, Titanium, and many others, including Gold and Silver) may look just like common Country Rock, and show no mineralization whatever.

3. Certain ores (Platinum, Palladium, Iridium, Osmium, Ruthenium, Nickel, Cobalt, Tin, Arsenic, Copper, Bismuth, and many others, including Gold and Silver) may look just like common Iron Pyrites, and are discarded as worthless.

4. Remember the rock with the silver-white specks that you discarded as "just more worthless white iron?" Are you sure those silvery-white specks were not Tellurium? If it was, you may have had one of the richest of all Gold or Silver ores, containing thousands of dollars per ton in Gold or Silver. Yet there is no color visible! So you discard it and continue looking at "worthless rocks." That is what prospectors have done for a hundred years. Their Gold and Silver Telluride's are still scattered around their prospect holes and mine dumps. Someone can come with the proper knowledge and equipment, find their hidden values and, maybe, discover another Cripple Creek!

Professional Mineralogists today do not use appearance alone to separate the "worthless rocks" from the valuable minerals. Instead, they use the proper equipment.

The lack of knowledge and the proper equipment has been the cause of many an overlooked fortune!



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The Time Is Right To Step Up To A Digital SLR Camera
Posted by: Webmaster on Saturday, May 17, 2008 - 12:13 PM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

The Time Is Right To Step Up To A Digital SLR Camera

(NAPSI)-Summer is filled with important family activities like graduation, vacation, family barbecues and days at the beach. That means there are plenty of picture-taking opportunities for Mom and Dad, so don't settle for "not quite right" pictures or completely missed ones due to your camera's sluggish performance.

Today's digital SLR (DSLR) cameras are user-friendly, and prices are at an all-time low, so isn't it time to move to a faster, more versatile camera? Here are some important features to look for when stepping-up from a point-and-shoot to a DSLR camera:

1. Since you're used to using the LCD screen on your point-and-shoot camera, make the transition easier with a DSLR such as the Sony Alpha DSLR-A350 camera that offers Live View. It gives you the option of composing with the LCD instead of the optical viewfinder without sacrificing auto focusing speed. The DSLR-A350 camera lets you move away from the viewfinder and into the moment.

2. Go for a camera with in-camera image stabilization and you'll never have to worry about buying special lenses to compensate for shaky hands when you're shooting in low light (or when you've had too much coffee).

3. A tiltable LCD screen is a good investment because it means you won't have to be a contortionist when taking photos over your head at a graduation ceremony or at a low angle to capture the kids building a sand castle at the beach.

4. Look for DSLRs with anti-dust technology, which helps avoid getting dust on the camera sensor when you change lenses. If a tiny dust bunny manages to sneak in, this technology will also shake it off.

5. Ease-of-use is critical when you're moving up to a DSLR, so look for a camera that offers some of the features you're used to using, such as scene selection modes. Also, make sure the camera's control layout and menu system are easy to navigate. Visit your local camera store to get some hands-on time before you buy.

Digital SLR cameras are ideal for taking pictures of fast-moving kids.



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Farm Field Relic Hunting Tips
Posted by: Webmaster on Saturday, May 17, 2008 - 12:12 PM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Farm Field Relic Hunting Tips
by Barry Weeknight


Hi all you relic hunters, Try this...the next time you venture out into a farm field to do some relic hunting, walk right smack out in the middle of it and hunt in a circular fashion outward, like a spiral. Do this for about a 100-yard diameter. If no hot spots are found, then go into the immediate corner closest to the farmhouse if there is one, if not, just go into any old corner. Start from the very corner and work along the perimeters edge for about 100 yards each way, then go back to the very corner and walk and work your way diagonally toward the center of the field for about another 100 yards. If absolutely no hot spots are found hunting in this fashion, then don't waste your time and move onto another farm field, as there are thousands around and start this process all over again. I can guarantee you that through persistence, sooner or later you will come across a treasure-laden field.

All the while hunting, keep a close eye out for tell signs of colonial habitation. Look for things such as old red clay brick, sandstone, pottery shards, clam shells, broken colored glass, broken pieces of white clay pipe stems, etc. If such items are discovered, then you are on and in a colonial site. Buckle down and overlap and work the site more slowly. Also, hunt the higher elevations first, as they could be the sites on where the old house stood. Also, if a lot of signals are given in the lower depressions, it could be the trash site. These old trash pits could possess lot of old collectible bottles and other antique things.

Most Coin shops sell special oil for the preservation of coins. If you are serious about protecting your old coppers, you should purchase a bottle of this stuff. As soon as you find an old copper like a Large cent or state issued copper, immediately dip a cotton cue tip into the oil and rub it all over the entire coins surface. Not only will it prevent further deterioration from the oxygen, but it will also clean it at the same time, bringing to life more detail that otherwise couldn't be seen with the naked eye. Also, purchase a jeweler's eyepiece too for further examination of the coins detail. Include these items into your possibility bag as well.

These are just some pointers that I have learned from my experience.

Good luck & happy relic hunting. Maybe I will see you in the field.



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Lesser known Treasure Hunting sites in & near your hometown
Posted by: Webmaster on Saturday, May 17, 2008 - 12:09 PM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Lesser known Treasure Hunting sites in & near your hometown

Now that most of the more obvious sites have been hunted time and time again, I thought I might try to inspire some members to search for those lesser known sites in their hometown, sites which have been productive to me in the past.

1 ) Parking Strips or Tree Lines: the grassy area between the sidewalk and the street can be very productive. Usually this area is owned by the town, and is considered public property, but when in doubt feel free to ask. Extremely old coins can be found in these areas as they were once the sides of original dirt roads, and are usually located in the center of smaller towns. Later coins can be found as people likely dropped them while fumbling for car keys, or perhaps as they disappeared into the snow on a winter's day. To find them, simply drive around the older sections of a town. Such strips are plentiful in more urban areas such as Charlestown, Claremont, and Bellows Falls.

2) circles/triangles: When I'm searching a new area I look for circles and triangles on the map. Many neighborhoods have these small grassy areas in front of a few houses or at the intersection of two roads where children played. The smaller ones have been very productive in the past.

3) Sledding Hills: Most communities have these, located at a golf course, reservoir, or private land. Search the slopes very carefully and slowly and you will be rewarded with a variety of finds.

4) Old Roads: Any dirt road or path into the woods may have a long history of heavy use. Abandoned roads in smaller towns, or paths leading through conservation land have been productive in the past-especially if you can research that there was an orchard or cellar hole where they led to.

5) Hospitals: Two-thirds of all hospitals built in the 1800's are now closed in the state. Often the buildings have been abandoned or sold for other uses, but try to get permission to hunt and you may well be rewarded.

6) Picnic grounds: These sites have been the most productive for members in recent years but require a lot of research. Sometimes they are found by word of mouth from people in you community. Most have been abandoned and can be overgrown, but recent sites have yielded over 100 silver coins at certain locations.

7) The outskirts of any park examine a park in your town and you may notice that the edges are bit overgrown or wooded. Don't waste your time searching the nicely trimmed grass-go out into the brush and high grass where the real limits of the park used to be!!!

Always keep an eye out for potential sites, talk to people you meet about your hobby, keep your detector in your vehicle just in case, and ask permission when appropriate. Let's see some more incredible finds next month! Happy Hunting!



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Florida’s Treasure Coast & the 1715 Fleet
Posted by: Webmaster on Saturday, May 17, 2008 - 12:08 PM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Florida’s Treasure Coast & the 1715 Fleet
Bob Ellis 05-11-07

In between Sebastian, FL and Stuart, FL lies miles of beaches called the Treasure Coast where during the 17th and 18th centuries Spanish ships and galleons wrecked along this coast. Some of the ships were filled with unbelievable treasures from the New World and the Orient that were destined for Spain but instead crashed into the outer reefs and sandy bottoms creating hidden treasure waiting to be rediscovered.

Modern history had forgotten about these shipwreck tragedies along this coast until a treasure hunter named Kip Wagner in the early 1960 wrote a book called Pieces of Eight describing his adventures rediscovering the 1715 Fleet that sank all along this coast and the subsequent reaping of millions of dollars of treasure for himself, a few friends and the state of Florida from the sunken fleet.

Today, Wagner’s adventures and finds still motivate treasure hunters, researchers and archeologists alike to search for the remaining artifacts of known and unknown shipwrecks. Silver and gold coins and other treasure are still being found on these beaches and the adjacent ocean floor. If you visit the Treasure Coast bring your metal detector. You might bring home a piece of Spanish colonial history with you.

For an armchair adventure of the trials and tribulations of shipwreck treasure hunting in the early 1960’s you must read “Pieces of Eight ” by Kip Wagner. He takes you from his first bout of treasure fever to the eventual successful recovery of millions of dollars of treasure and artifacts. Along the way he reveals to the reader the failures and the disappointments encountered and the amount of dedication, persistence, hard work, innovation, and ingenuity that was needed to succeed. Wagner included in his book many pictures of the treasure recovered from the 1715 fleet but if you want to see actual 1715 fleet treasure its on display at two museums in Sebastian, FL.

At the McLarty Treasure Museum at Sebastian Inlet State Park actual 1715 fleet treasures and artifacts can be viewed for a mere one dollar per person entry fee. If you have time see the Arts and Entertainment production (The Queen’s Jewels and the 1715 Fleet) that is shown throughout the day at no addition cost to you. The museum itself occupies land once used as the survivors and salvaging camp for the 1715 Spanish Plate Fleet and is a National Historical Landmark today. Metal detecting is allowed on its beach front if you can’t wait to try to find your own treasure but access to the beach is about a quarter of a mile away. If you want to see more actual 1715 fleet treasure or to buy an artifact from the 1715 fleet stop by the Mel Fisher's Treasures museum.

Mel Fisher passed away in 1998, but his family still operates the Mel Fisher's Treasures museum. Located at 1322 U.S. Highway One Sebastian, Fl the museum was founded by Mel Fisher to display some of the artifact from the 1715 fleet that his team discovered after he was invited in the early 1960’s to join the successful Kip Wagner team to search for the remaining 1715 fleet treasure. Besides the museum, the price of admission includes a short movie about Mel Fisher and admission to their gift shop. If you must have a coin from the 1715 fleet or from the Atocha they will sell you one but first you should try to find one yourself on the Treasure Coast.

Every year metal detecting treasure hunters make the Treasure Coast live up to its name by finding treasure on the its beaches. You might find some 1715 fleet artifacts to take home with you if you have time to metal detect for a few hours. To increase your chances, follow the directions given in “Shipwrecks Near Wabasso Beach” by Frogfoot Weller to find the specific beaches were gold and silver coins from the 1715 fleet have been found or detected. Detecting is allowed on most beaches all day long but most in water detecting is prohibited by law. While on vacation, one of my fellow metal detecting club members detected a gold coin from the 1715 fleet in December 2005 and his wife or son detected a silver coin called a four real on the same day. The chances of finding an artifact or coin from the 1715 fleet remains slim but you might be one of the lucky ones like my fellow club members were.



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Confessions of a Professional Treasure Hunter - Part 12
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, April 24, 2008 - 12:49 PM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Confessions of a Professional Treasure Hunter

Part: 12

By: EI Cazador

A girl with a gun. To me there are few things more dangerous. One of the only

things more dangerous is a woman with a gun who thinks her man has been

cheating on her. It was a compact, chromed, revolving six shooter. This was an

extremely reliable weapon, nothing to jam on, except the target. The target

was my Captain and I walking into the Barrel House late at night with the wind

just ... howling. A hurricane was coming. We were far enough away from any

other property so with the loud wind no one would probably even hear the

shots. Real gun shots don't sound like the movies, even at a small distance.

They sound like little-lady finger firecrackers.

I followed my Captain into the Barrel House and into one of those moments of

truth. His wife found out that he had a "girlfriend" in town and was now in the

house, waiting alone. Only after we got there was I told that she may have the

gun that my Captain apparently brought with him on this trip. Great. He

stepped inside first and we did not see anything from the kitchen. "Wait here,

I'll take a look", he said. I left the door open behind us so we could run from the

bullets if we had to. A long minute passed by when he came back and said that

his wife was ok and that I could leave if I wanted to. I did not need to be told

twice. "0k", I said, "1'11.. be.. down at Lexie's house", my "girlfriend" at the

time. Gone.

The hurricane, the name of which I forget, was building in intensity and Lexie

was really glad to see me. She lived just a mile down the road. I asked her

where the covers where for the windows. They were stored on the main level

and we went down to get them. She told me that some of the windows in the

front of the house had been changed and the covers did not all match. Too bad,

this was the side facing the huge storm. We grabbed what we could and nailed

the covers on the windows that did not match. They almost fit. We then went

to the side of the house and clipped the correct covers over the other windows

at the top and then at the bottom. The storm covers were made out of a thin

wood but were better than nothing. It was fine plywood painted the same color

as the house. It seemed that someone spent as much time on how they looked

as on their ability to stop flying debris. I guess the covers were also designed for

when the property was left empty for long periods by the owner and the house

still had to look good. They looked great. These window covers hung by two

hooks at the top and then were secured in place by two clips on the bottom.

We put several on until it became impossible to work. There was no way we

were going to be able to get the ladder out and do the upper floors. The winds

were blowing so hard that the covers were being pulled out of our hands by

Mother Nature. Somebody was going to get a corner in the face. You could feel

the wind building and it became dangerous to even be outside. Then the rain

started to blow sideways. It was time for us to get inside the house.

We got back into the house right before the rain really started to pour. The

word rainfall does not apply since the rain was not falling but was in fact

speeding sideways and hitting the house like tiny liquid meteors, exploding on

impact. The drops and sound started to build higher and louder. The house

became a drum with water and sticks beating on the south side. Not all of the

windows were covered and we hoped that a tree would not fall into one of

them. The house was surrounded by numerous tall pine trees; the trunks were

the size of dinner plates and smaller. The wind blew everything sideways, the

trees, the branches, the needles, all pointing north. Outside turned misty and

whitish with water. We could see the water pooling in the yard and saw it rise

on the side of the Gulf of Mexico only a few dozen yards from the house. It was

now starting to get dark.



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Suzy’s Funnies
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, April 03, 2008 - 09:27 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Suzy’s Funnies

Talking to God

A man climbs to the top of Mt. Sinai to get close enough to talk to God. Looking up, he asks the Lord... "God, what does a million years mean to you?" The Lord replies, "A minute." The man asks, "And what does a million dollars mean to you?" The Lord replies, "A penny." The man asks, "Can I have a penny?" The Lord replies, "In a minute."

After the wedding the husband clarifies the following: "I will leave home whenever I want and I will be back at home whenever I like. And I don't want to hear any complaints in this regard. Any questions?" The wife answers: "That's, okay! But in this bedroom there will be sex at 7 p.m. whether you are here or not! Any questions?"

A married man has an affair with his secretary. One day, they are at her flat and make love the whole afternoon. Afterwards, they are completely exhausted and fall asleep. They don't wake up until 8 p.m. The man puts on his clothes hastily. Before he enters his car, he walks through the mud so that his shoes get dirty. As soon, as he arrives home his wife asks him: "Where have you been?"
He answers: "I cannot lie to you! I have an affair with my secretary. We made love the whole afternoon!" His wife looks at his shoes and says: "Damned liar! You were playing golf again!"

Chocolate versus sex (Rating: 2.60, Love & Relationships )
1. You can eat chocolate during work without your colleagues finding it scandalous.
2. You can ask a strange woman whether you can have chocolate without getting a slap in the face for it.

3. Good chocolate is easy to find.
4. You can eat chocolate on all days of the month.
5. You can eat as many different bars of chocolate at the same time as you want.
6. If you eat chocolate, it does not prevent your neighbors from sleeping.
7. You are never too old or too young for good chocolate.
8. You don't become pregnant from eating chocolate.
9. You don't get hair into your mouth by eating chocolate.
10. When you eat chocolate it doesn't matter, if you bite into the nuts.

A man finds an old lamp at the beach. He takes it home, rubs against it and suddenly a genie appears and says: "I will fulfill you one wish! Reflect a little bit and then tell me what I can do for you!"
The man reflects for a few minutes: "I am afraid of flying and I also get seasick very fast. Nevertheless, I would like to spend my holidays on Hawaii this year. So, could you build a bridge across the Pacific Ocean from Los Angeles to Hawaii?"
The genie is looking shocked and says: "This is nearly impossible! To build such a bridge, incredible quantities of concrete and steel would be necessary! I am sorry but you have to select another wish!"
The man reflects again and finally says: "I want to understand the thoughts of women!"
The genie reflects for a while, too, and finally he asks the man: "When do you want to go on vacation on Hawaii?"

A motorist driving by a Texas ranch hit and killed a calf that was crossing the road. The driver went to the owner of the calf and explained what had happened. He then asked what the animal was worth. "Oh, about $200 today," said the rancher. "But in six years it would have been worth $900. So $900 is what I'm out." The motorist sat down and wrote out a check and handed it to the farmer.
"Here," he said, "is the check for $900. It is post-dated six years from now."

Things Rednecks Will Never Say - I'll take Shakespeare for 1000, Alex.
-Duct tape won't fix that.
-Honey, I think we should sell the pickup and buy a family sedan.
-Come to think of it, I'll have a Heineken.
-We don't keep firearms in this house.
-Has anybody seen the sideburns trimmer?
-You can't feed that to the dog.
-I thought Graceland was tacky.
-No kids in the back of the pickup, it's just not safe.
-Wrestling's fake.
-Honey, did you mail that donation to Greenpeace?
-We're vegetarians.
-Do you think my gut is too big?
-I'll have grapefruit and grapes instead of biscuits and gravy.
-Honey, we don't need another dog.
-Who gives a crap who won the Civil War?
-Give me the small bag of pork rinds.
-Too many deer heads detract from the decor.
-Spittin' is such a nasty habit.
-I just couldn't find a thing at Wal-Mart today.
-Checkmate.
-She's too young to be wearing a bikini.
-Does the salad bar have bean sprouts?
-Hey, here's an episode of "Hee Haw" that we haven't seen.
-I don't have a favorite college team.
-Be sure to bring my salad dressing on the side.
-You ALL.
-Those shorts ought to be a little longer, Darla.
-Nope, no more for me. I'm drivin' tonight.

A guy was trying to console a friend who'd just found his wife in bed with another man. "Get over it, buddy," he said. "It's not the end of the world." "It's all right for you to say," answered his buddy. "But what if you came home one night and caught another man in bed with your wife?" The fella ponders for a moment, then says, "I'd break his cane and kick his seeing-eye dog in the ass."

Nothing to loose, There was a blonde who found herself sitting next to a Lawyer on an airplane. The lawyer just kept bugging the blonde wanting her to play a game of intelligence. Finally, the lawyer offered her 10 to 1 odds, and said every time the blonde could not answer one of his questions, she owed him $5.00, but every time he could not answer hers, he'd give her $50.00. The lawyer figured he could not lose, and the blonde reluctantly accepted. The lawyer first asked, "What is the distance between the Earth and the nearest star?" Without saying a word the blonde handed him $5.00. then the blonde asked, "What goes up a hill with 3 legs and comes back down the hill with 4 legs?" Well, the lawyer looked puzzled. He took several hours, looking up everything he could on his laptop and even placing numerous air-to-ground phone calls trying to find the answer. Finally, angry and frustrated, he gave up and paid the blonde $50.00. The blonde put the $50 into her purse without comment, but the lawyer insisted, "What is the answer to your question?" Without saying a word, the blonde handed him $5.

My goldfish died, Little Nancy was in the garden filling in a hole when her neighbor peered over the fence. Interested in what the cheeky-faced youngster was up to, he politely asked, "What are you up to there, Nancy?" "My goldfish died," replied Nancy tearfully, without looking up, "and I've just buried him." The neighbor was concerned, "That's an awfully big hole for a goldfish, isn't it?" Nancy patted down the last heap of earth then replied, "That's because he's inside your damn cat.

A man and his wife are seated in a fancy French restaurant for dinner. After the waiter arrives the man says, "I'll have your biggest, thickest Porterhouse steak." The waiter replies "But monsieur ... what about ze mad cow?" The man replies, "She'll have a salad."

A group of terrorists hijacked a plane full of lawyers. They called down to ground control with their list of demands and added that if their demands weren't met, they would release one lawyer every hour.

A Bus stops and two men get on. They sit down and engage in an animated conversation. The lady sitting behind them ignores them at first, but her attention is galvanized when she hears one of the men say the following: Emma come first, Den I come. Den two asses come togeder.
I come once-a-mora. Two asses, they come togeder again. I come again and pee twice.
Then I come one lasta time. "You foul mouthed swine" says the lady, "in this country we don't talk about our sex lives in public!" "Hey, coola down lady" said the man "I'm a justa tellin' my friend how to spella Mississippi
"

Little Jimmy was studying for an American history test when his Grampa came by.
He looked up at his Grampa and said, "When you were in school, you had it easy. Back then, American history was considered current events."

whats the differance between a camera and a sock??? A camera takes photos and a sock takes 5 toes...

An Englishman, Frenchman, Mexican, and Texan were flying across country on a small plane when the pilot comes on the loud speaker and says, "We're having mechanical problems and the only way we can make it to the next airport is for 3 of you to open the door and jump. At least one of you will survive."
The four open the door and look out below.
The Englishman takes a deep breath and hollers, "God Save The Queen," and jumps.
The Frenchman gets really inspired and hollers, "Viva La France," and he also jumps.
This really pumps up the Texan so he hollers, "Remember the Alamo," and he grabs the Mexican and throws him out of the plane.

Q: Why do people wear shamrocks on St. Patrick's Day? A: Regular rocks are too heavy .

A little boy was doing his math homework. He said to himself, "Two plus five, that son of a ***** is seven. Three plus six, that son of a ***** is nine...." His mother heard what he was saying and gasped, "What are you doing?" The little boy answered, "I'm doing my math homework, Mom." "And this is how your teacher taught you to do it?" the mother asked. "Yes," he answered. Infuriated, the mother asked the teacher the next day, "What are you teaching my son in math?" The teacher replied, "Right now, we are learning addition." The mother asked, "And are you teaching them to say two plus two, that son of a ***** is four?" After the teacher stopped laughing, she answered, "What I taught them was, two plus two, THE SUM OF WHICH, is four."

Two elderly women were out driving in a large car, both women barely large enough to see over the dashboard. As they cruised along, they came to an intersection. The stoplight was red, but they just went right on through. The woman in the passenger seat thought to herself, "I must be losing it, I could have sworn we just went through a red light." After a few more minutes, they came to another intersection, the light was red, and again they went right through. This time, the passenger was almost sure that the light had been red, but was also concerned that she might be seeing things.
She was getting nervous, and decided to pay very close attention. At the next intersection, sure enough, the light was definitely red, and they went right through it. She turned to the other woman and said, "Mildred! Did you know we just ran through three red lights in a row? You could have killed us!" Mildred turned to her and said, "Oh my goodness! Am I driving?"

It was this little girl's first day of school, and the teacher asked her what her name was.
She replied, "Happy Butt." The teacher said, "Honey I don't think that's your name. You need to go to the principal's office and get this straightened out." So she went to the principal's office and he asked, "What's your name?" And the little girl said, "Happy Butt." The principal called the girl's mother to get this straightened out once and for all. After getting off the phone, he looked at the little girl and said, "Honey, your name is Gladys, not Happy Butt." The girl then exclaimed, "Glad Ass, Happy Butt, what's the difference?"

A Canadian is drinking in a New York bar when he gets a call on his cell phone.
He hangs up, grinning from ear to ear, orders a round of drinks for everybody in the bar, then he announces his wife has just produced a typical Canadian baby boy weighing 25 pounds. Nobody can believe that any new baby can weigh in at 25 pounds, but the Canadian just shrugs, "That's about average up North, folks? Like I said, my boy's a typical Canadian baby boy." Congratulations showered him from all around; many exclamations of "WOW!" were heard, and one woman actually fainted due to sympathy pains. Two weeks later the Canadian returns to the bar. The bartender says "Say, you're the father of that typical Canadian baby that weighed 25 pounds at birth, aren't you? Everybody's been makin' bets about how big he'd be in two weeks. We were gonna call you?? So how much does he weigh now?"
The proud father answers, "Seventeen pounds." The bartender is puzzled & concerned. "What happened? He already weighed 25 pounds the day he was born."
The Canadian father takes a slow swig from his Molson, wipes his lips on his shirt sleeve, leans into the bartender & proudly says .......
"Had him circumcised".

A politician was running for re-election and was talking at a campaign stop to his constituents. "My opponent has called me a liar. Rest assured, I have never lied to you. The only problem I have is that the facts don't always match up with what I believe."

There's a nickels worth of difference between a republican and a democrat Put a nickel on the table and a republican will kill you for it. Do the same, and a democrat will steal it from you.

Why did the man with one hand cross the road? To get to the second hand shop.

A man was invited for dinner at a friend's house. Every time the host needed something, he preceded his request to his wife by calling her "My Love", "Darling", Sweetheart", etc., etc. His friend looked at him and said, "That's really nice after all of these years you've been married to keep saying those little pet names." The host said, "Well, honestly, I've forgotten her name.

A man went into a local tavern and took a seat at the bar next to a women patron. He turned to her and said, "This is a special day, I'm celebrating." "What a coincidence," said the woman, "I'm celebrating, too". She clinked glasses with him and asked, "What are you celebrating?" "I'm a chicken farmer," he replied. "For years all my hens were infertile, but today they're finally fertile." "What a coincidence, the woman said. "My husband and I have been trying to have a child. Today, my gynecologist told me I'm pregnant! How did your chickens become fertile?" she asked.
"I switched cocks," he replied. "What a coincidence," she said.

Bad Golfer, Dong Foster was 26 over par by the eighth hole, had landed a fleet of golf balls in the water hazard, and dug himself into a trench fighting his way out of the rough, when his caddy coughed during a 12-inch putt. Jim exploded. "You've got to be the worst caddy in the world!" he screamed. "I doubt it," replied the caddy. "That would be too much of a coincidence."



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Easy Recipes
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, April 03, 2008 - 09:27 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Easy Recipes

Chocolate, Chili, and Walnut Brownies

These treats have more flavors than an ordinary brownie--they also offer cinnamon and chili powder in addition to the chocolate.

Ingredients:

1 cup (2 sticks) butter

4 oz. unsweetened chocolate

2 cups sugar

1 tsp vanilla

2 Tbsp New Mexican Hatch Chili powder (if necessary, substitute other mild chili powder)

2 Tbsp cinnamon

3 eggs

1/2 tsp salt

3/4 cup flour

1 1/2 cups chopped walnuts

Method

Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Melt the chocolate in a double boiler (or microwave) along with 1/2 cup (1 stick) of butter. Cool. Cream the remaining stick of butter, the sugar and vanilla with mixer. (Start with slow speed and increase gradually.) Add the chili powder and cinnamon. Add the eggs, one at a time, mixing after each. Grease and lightly flour a 13x9-inch pan. When the chocolate mixture has cooled, add to mixer and blend thoroughly. Mix salt into flour then add to mixture, beating at low speed just until combined. Finally, stir in chopped walnuts. Pour into pan and bake for 25 - 30 minutes. When a toothpick pulls out clean, your brownies are done.

Notes: Try this with a scoop of vanilla ice cream on top and do not be afraid of the chili! It is a delightful blend with chocolate and cinnamon. For the best flavor experience, use New Mexican Hatch chili, grown, harvested and dried in Hatch, New Mexico. This powder is unique because all stems and seeds have been removed, leaving behind a smooth and vibrant flavor.

Yummy Squash

Yellow summer squash is sliced and simmered until just tender, then layered with stuffing mix and a saucy blend of cream of chicken soup, mayonnaise, and cheddar cheese.

Ingredients:

4 to 5 medium yellow summer squash

1/2 medium onion

1 cup Stove Top Stuffing mix

1 can cream of chicken soup

1/2 cup mayonnaise

1/3 cup shredded cheddar cheese

1 tsp Dijon-style mustard

1/4 cup milk

Butter-flavor spray or pats of butter

Method

Slice squash and chop onion. Cover with water and cook about 10 minutes, until just barely soft. Put 1/2 cup stuffing mix on bottom of a buttered 8X8-inch baking dish or pan. Drain squash and put on top of stuffing. In a bowl combine cream of chicken soup, mayonnaise, cheese, mustard and milk. Pour over squash and onion. Top with remaining 1/2 cup stuffing mix, spray with butter or top with pats of butter. Bake 30 minutes at 350 degrees.
Notes: Great way to use the abundance of squash from your garden this summer.



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Mexican Recipes
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, April 03, 2008 - 09:27 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Mexican Recipes

Traditional Salsa with Baked Chips

This traditional salsa combines tomatoes, onion, peppers, cilantro lime juice, and is served with home-baked tortilla chips.

Ingredients:

4 Medium Ripe Tomatos

1 Medium White Onion

2 Jalapeno Peppers

1 Handful of Cilantro

Juice of 1 Lime

Salt and Pepper to taste

Tortillas

Turtle Chimich

A chocolate bar is wrapped inside a large flour tortilla and deep-fried, then topped with caramel-pecan and hot fudge sauces and ice cream.

Ingredients:

8 (1.55 oz.) chocolate candy bars (such as Hershey's)

8 Burrito-size flour tortillas

1 (32 oz.) bottle vegetable Oil

1 (12 oz.) jar Caramel Ice Cream Topping

1 c. pecans, chopped

1 (12 oz) jar Hot Fudge Ice Cream Topping

1 (1 Qt.) container Premium Vanilla Ice Cream

Method

Place one candy bar in the center of a tortilla. Fold the bottom of the tortilla up & over the candy bar, and then fold the sides in & over. Fold the top of the tortilla over the folded sides and place, seam side down, on a tray or baking sheet. Repeat to make the remaining chimichangas. Heat the vegetable oil in a large stockpot to 360 degrees. Using tongs, place 2 chimichangas, seam side down, in the hot oil. Hold the chimichangas down for a few seconds to seal. Cook until golden brown on all sides, about 2-3 minutes. Drain the chimichangas on a wire rack and repeat to make the remaining chimichangas. Heat the caramel sauce in a small saucepan over medium heat. Add the pecans and bring just to a boil, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat and cool slightly, about 5 minutes. Heat the hot fudge in a micro-safe bowl in the microwave on high about 30 seconds. Place a chimichanga on each dessert plate and top with caramel-pecan sauce. Drizzle hot fudge over the chimichanga and serve with a scoop of vanilla ice cream.

Spicy Pumpkin Tortilla Soup

Easy, hearty and perfect for autumn. The pumpkin and chipotle add an extra depth of flavor to this quick-to-fix tortilla soup.

Ingredients:

2 Tablespoons olive oil

1 cup finely chopped onion

1 teaspoon minced garlic

1 teaspoon ground cumin

1-1/2 cups canned pumpkin puree (not pumpkin pie filling)

2 cans (14 oz. each) Mexican-style diced tomatoes

1 to 2 seeded and minced chipotle peppers (packed in adobo sauce)

1 carton (32 oz) reduced-sodium chicken broth

1/4 cup chopped cilantro (plus additional for garnish)

1 cup grated colby-jack cheese

tortilla chips, broken up

1/2 cup Mexican crema or sour cream

toasted pumpkin seeds

Method

Heat oil in large saucepan over medium-high heat. Cook onion and garlic until tender. Stir in cumin and cook 30 seconds. Stir in pumpkin. Add tomatoes, chipotle, and broth and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer 20 minutes. Stir in cilantro. To serve, divide soup among bowls and top with cheese and tortilla chips. Garnish with a dollop of crema and sprinkle with pumpkin seeds and cilantro.

Skillet Enchiladas

If you love Mexican foods, you'll really like this one-dish enchilada meal with all its cheese, green chilies, olives, and enchilada sauce.

Ingredients:

1 pound ground beef

1 medium onion, chopped

1 can (10-3/4 oz.) condensed cream of mushroom soup

1 can (10 oz.) enchilada sauce

1/3 cup milk

1 to 2 tbsp. canned chopped green chilies

Vegetable oil

8 corn tortillas

1 1/2 cups finely shredded cheddar cheese, divided

1/2 cup chopped ripe olives

Method

In a large skillet cook beef and onion over medium heat until meat is no longer pink; drain. Stir in the soup, enchilada sauce, milk, and chilies. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and simmer for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Meanwhile, in another skillet, heat 1/4 inch of oil. Dip each tortilla in hot oil for 3 seconds each side or just until limp; drain on paper towels. Top each tortilla with 1/4 cup of cheese and 1 tablespoon olives. Roll up and place over beef mixture, spooning some of mixture over the enchiladas. Cover and cook until heated through, about 5 minutes. Sprinkle with the remaining cheese; cover and cook until cheese is melted.

El Cid Chili

Not a dish for the faint of heart. This chili is full of bold flavors that include chorizo, jalapeno, chili powder, and even cinnamon, which adds a nice earthy flavor.

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons olive oil

2 pounds sirloin steak, cut into 1-inch cubes

1/2 pound ground beef

12 ounces chorizo sausage, casing removed, cut into 1/2 cubes

1 large yellow onion, coarsely chopped

1/4 cup chili powder

1 tablespoon garlic salt

2 teaspoons cumin

1 teaspoon dried basil

2 (14.5-ounce) cans beef broth

2 (14.5-ounce) cans whole tomatoes, drained

1 cup cilantro, chopped

1 cinnamon stick

3 bay leaves

2 green jalapenos, slit lengthwise 3 times each

1 tablespoon yellow cornmeal

Salt and pepper, to taste

Garnish with Cheddar and sour cream

Method

Place oil in a large, heavy pot over medium heat. Brown the sirloin in batches. Remove to a bowl with a slotted spoon. Add ground beef, chorizo and onions to the pot and brown. Make sure to break up the meat. Return sirloin to the pot. Stir in remaining ingredients, except for garnishes. Cut three slits in each pepper from top to bottom but not all the way through to the bottom. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer for 2 hours. Stir occasionally, breaking up tomatoes. Before serving, discard cinnamon stick, bay leaves and jalapenos. Garnish, if desired.



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Dutch Recipes
Posted by: Webmaster on Thursday, April 03, 2008 - 09:27 AM
The Treasure Hunter's Gazette

  

Dutch Recipes

HACHEE

INGREDIENTS:

1kg stewed beef

2 cups vinegar

1 large onion

5-6 apples (peeled, cored & cubed)

2-3 bay leaves

salt & pepper to taste

INSTRUCTIONS:

In a large pot, fry a little oil (2 tbps) and add the onions. Fry a few minutes,

and then add all other ingredients. Cook over medium heat till beef is cooked.

Then heat on low and cook 6-7 hours till the beef has broken down. Serve with mashed potatoes or noodles.

Smaakelijk eten!

WALTER'S CUCUMBER SALAD

INGREDIENTS:

1 english cucumber (skin peeled off)

1/2 tbsp sunflower or vegetable oil

1/2 cup white vinegar

1-2 tbsp of sugar (more if you don't like it too sour)

salt & pepper to taste

INSTRUCTIONS:

Slice the cucumber very thin (I use a hand grater/slicer)

Take the cucumber slices in your hands, and squeeze all the juice out

(as much as possible) Discard the cucumber juice. Place into a bowl.

Make sure all the cucumber juice is out.Add all ingredients and mix.

Taste it to see if you need to add more sugar.

RODE KOOL

INGREDIENTS:

1 head of red cabbage

2-3 tbps brown sugar

1/4 margarine

1/2 medium onion (chopped)

2 apples (cubed & peeled)

1/2 tsp salt

1/8 tsp pepper

1/4 cup raisins

INSTRUCTIONS:

Cook the cabbage with the margarine for about 5 minutes. Add the apples, sugar&

onion. Cook for another 3 minutes. Add the rest of the ingredients, cover the pot and lower heat. Cook for about 20-25 minutes, and remember to stir occasionally. It's that easy!!

Currant Bread
Krentenbrood
6 C. flour 1/2 C. sugar
1/2C. butter 1 cake yeast
1 1/4C. milk 2 eggs
1 pkg. currants 1 t. salt
4 oz. citron
Add currants when molding for second time. Bake in slow oven.

Pancakes Flensjes
1 pt. sweet milk, 4 eggs
pinch of salt and flour to make thin batter
For each cake drop a large spoonful of the batter into boiling lard and cook like doughnuts. Serve hot with jelly or syrup.

Muffins Broedertjes
Beat 3 eggs very light
Add 2 1/2 C. sour cream in which has been dissolved 1 t. soda
Add 2 1/3 C. flour, 3/4 t. salt
These are to be baked on top of stove, in well buttered hot iron gem pans. Fill pans half way; when lower side is brown, turn with fork, and when done dip melted butter over them and sprinkle with powdered sugar.
This is a favorite dish with the Dutch boys & girls.

Old Fashioned Soft Molasses Cookies
Stroop Koekjes
4 C. flour 2 t. soda 1/4 t. salt
1 t. ginger 1/2 t. cinnamon
1 1/2 C. molasses 1/2 C. lard
1/4 C. butter 5 T. boiling water
1 egg

Measure shortening before melting. Add molasses and water and egg. Sift dry ingredients. Set out to cool for 1 hour. This dough is soft. Handle on well floured board. Roll 1/4 inch thick. Cut with cookie cutter.
Bake in moderate oven 325 degrees about 15 minutes.



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